The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Probing vs. Tapping

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Big Al's picture
Big Al

Probing vs. Tapping

Hello,

Recently I have read with interest that using an instant-read temperature probe is much more accurate than tapping the bottom of a loaf to determine if it is done.  

What I do not know is were to find a list of temperatures for different types of loaf.

Any help please? 

Big Al

 

RonRay's picture
RonRay

In general - unless expressly stated - people pick something in the range, 195ºF/90.5ºC to 210ºF/98.8ºC for the instant read temperature of a finish loaf.

Ron

GermanFoodie's picture
GermanFoodie

is indeed more accurate. We used to run a small bakery here in town, and in general AFAIC the internal temperature of the loaf should be around 200 F. That's how we always baked them, and it worked for us.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Yeah, certainly I prefer using a thermometer to tapping, a skill I never developed very well.  

My numbers are consitent with what RonRay and GermanFoodie already said.  I've always heard that breads that are softer and contain fat, something like a buttermilk sandwich bread, should come out of the oven around 190-195F, whereas a lean dough like a French bread or a Ciabatta should come out closer to 200-205F.  I've pulled Ciabattas out of the oven too early, when they are still moist and gummy inside, and I can attest that they are pretty nasty.  So "a bit north or south of 200F, depending on whether it should be dry or moist inside" is what I'd recommend.  

Good luck!

-Floyd

dick c's picture
dick c

For my every day bread I've started baking to a weight. I bake the same recipe once or twice a week, and have found that baking this particular loaf to 1 lb. 2.4 oz. is just enough to eliminate the any gumminess.  A thermometer definitely works better for me than tapping, but I could also use a better thermometer. 

jcking's picture
jcking

Could you please give the pre Bake weight and hydration of the loaf and is it a lean or enriched loaf?

Thanks Jim

dick c's picture
dick c

It's lean. I use 800 gr. of flour, 760 KAF bread flour and 40 whole wheat, around 520 grams of water, 1/4 tsp yeast, and 2 tsp salt. I'll divide that into 2 loaves. I bake on a stone, putting them in at 500 degrees and turn the oven down somewhat after 10 - 15 min.

I was using KAF's French-Style Country Bread recipe which didn't work well consistently for me, then tried Jim Lahey's no knead bread for a while... This is something in between. 

jcking's picture
jcking

The above adds up to about 1475g, at 2 loaves each equals 737g each. If the baked loaf is 1#2.4oz (521g) there would be a 29% moisture loss. Seems high?

Collecting data, sorry to cross thread ~ Jim

dick c's picture
dick c

I might not have been clear about the flour used. 800 grams was the sum of the flours. 800 gr flour +520 gr water + 11.5 gr salt = 1331.5 gr divided by 2 loaves = 665.75 gr each. They're baked (as batards) to 1 lb 2.4 oz, or 521.6 gr. each. 

Salt isn't included when figuring hydration is it?  Subtracting the salt from the finished weight I figure they went from 65% hydration down to 29%.    

 

jcking's picture
jcking

Yes salt, and yeast, can be included since it doesn't bake out, I'm just looking at water/moisture loss and collecting some data.

Thanks again ~ Jim