The Fresh Loaf

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Recipe posted on 'thefreshload.com' question

engineer41's picture
engineer41

Recipe posted on 'thefreshload.com' question

Hi everyone!

I have been a member for a while and browsing most of the time since I was always traveling on the road :) I am now finally home and came across this basic recipe:

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/handbook/whole-wheat-sourdough-sandwich-bread

 

I started working on my starter, however I am a bit puzzled by the quanity of my starter I must use?? I guess the starter can be used on day 4?

Your help is appreciated, thank you!

Svetlana

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Usually the starter wouldn't be ready to rise in such a short time (4 days). It needs to be at least doubling or better, tripling in 10 or so hours at room temperature. That is a good way to determine the yeast activity in the  culture. There are also many bacteria that multiply and produce acids that deliver flavor to the breads. The bacteria take longer to establish a strong population. So when the starter triples in 10 hours or so at 100% hydration (equal parts water and flour by weight) give it a try.

Eric

engineer41's picture
engineer41

Thank you for your reply...sorry, I am new to starters so this is probably very basic...

How much of the starter would I use in this recipe?

Svetlana

 

sheffield's picture
sheffield (not verified)

"Whole wheat Starter: Two options
•    Wet starter (100% hydration) 300 grams or 1 ¼ cup
•    Stiff starter (60% hydration) 240 grams or 1 cup"

engineer41's picture
engineer41

Thank you .... I feel silly, I misread :( ! 

sheffield's picture
sheffield (not verified)

Happens to me all the time!

Aussie Pete's picture
Aussie Pete

Hi there Engineer 41,

Good advice from ehanner.

I started baking with my new starter after 5 to 7 days. Thats because it was doubling and growing out of the jar after day 5. As it has become older(it's about 6 weeks old at present) each bake is producing a more mature flavour.

From the original culture I now have 2 starters. One is a straight white culture and the  other is fed on a 50/50 blend of wholemeal spelt  and white bakers flour  giving two different styles of sourdough. Both are at 100% hydration.

When I use the white starter I find 200grms of starter to 500 grms of bakers flour with 300grms of hydration (60%) is sufficient. This provides me with 2 X 500 to 540grm loaves. I make small loaves now as there is only my wife and I as our son has left home. Mind you he pinches any spare frozen loaf from the freezer when he leaves. A compliment I guess.

The wholemeal spelt loaf ( I've noticed) takes a bit more to get the same rise as the white. I will now be taking it to 300 grms for my next spelt bake and adjusting the dry extra flour accordingly. 

When baking with the spelt culture I generally add another 50 grms of wholemeal spelt flour but I reduce this weight from  the white bakers flour. In addition 30grms of olive oil and a half cup of skim powered milk  I found keeps the bread fresher  for a few days more.

Hope this helps...............Pete