The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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OMyStarz's picture
OMyStarz

Newbie

Hi all,

I've been reading your wonderful forum for a week or so now and am having a great time following your advice as I muddle my way through a few recipes.  I look forward to meeting some of you and hopefully improving my skills a bit. 

Have a great weekend everybody!

flournwater's picture
flournwater

Welcome to TFL.  Are you interested in getting involved with any of the challenges?

Here's a great place to start:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/25712/join-quotinside-jewish-bakeryquot-cookbook-challenge-starting-december-1st

OMyStarz's picture
OMyStarz

Thanks you so much!  I wasn't aware of the challenges but I will certainly take a look.  If it take any sort of real talent I will have to get way better really quickly. 

flournwater's picture
flournwater

It doesn't require a lot of "real talent".  Just a desire to learn (which includes making lots of mistakes  -  as all of us on this formum know) and a willingness to try.  If you like baking and are willing to accept the risk of failure, go for it.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I don't know how long you've been lurking about.  If you've read what I've written to newbies before, then move on now.  But, on the off chance you haven't, here are some suggestions. 

Practice, practice, practice.  Then report on your successes and failures to the rest of us.  We love to learn from others.

Read TFL regularly.  Follow up with reviews of questions especially relevant to your own interests.

Before you post questions, use the search function to its fullest extent.  Few questions asked haven't been asked in the past.  You'll get your answers and more through the search.

Lots of questions are answered in the video section.  Use your favorite search engine for videos as well.

Learn the distinction between cookbook and textbook.  I recommend using a textbook over a cookbook, especially when you're at the beginning.  Texts teach from the ground up in a way that cookbooks don't.  I have lots cookbooks and texts.  All have something to teach.  But I recommend a short textbook to start.  Try Dimuzion's Breadbaking.  It's quite elegant as a place to start.

OMyStarz's picture
OMyStarz

Thanks for all of your suggestions Richkaimd!  I will certainly take your advice to heart.  Unfortunately I jumped the gun and asked my first question already (oops!), but I've had a wonderful person respond and I'm more than grateful for the advice.  I hope it wasn't too much of a much-repeated newbie question.

I'm practicing as we speak!  I believe I'm having a bit of success as my first true sourdough loaf is rising in my oven now.  It seems to be doing great 5 hours in.  Maybe at 6 hours I can bake.  Once it bakes I won't really know how much of a "true" success it is since I don't know much about the characteristics I should be looking for, but an edible loaf would be a success to me right now.

I look forward to reading the textbook you mention, I'll be looking for it online.

 

jcking's picture
jcking

Hey OhMy,

There are at least a dozen others here who live in GA. I hope to see if sometime in the new year all y'all in GA can get together for a meet and greet.

Jim

OMyStarz's picture
OMyStarz

Hi Jim, that's great to know!  That sounds like it would be great fun, and for me a learning experience I'm sure.