The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

is this possible?what will happen

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cyyang94's picture
cyyang94

is this possible?what will happen

Hi guys,i am new to this site

i have afew questions here,

i am trying to make a wholewheat sourdough,so can i autolyse my whole wheat flour and water for awhile 1st?if yes how long and do i need to add my starter when autolysing ?

and about stretch and fold, my dough can stretch well and fold well, but the last step to turn it over often ruin it, because it keeps sticking to the table eventhough i keep flouring the table

next is the 1st rise,how long does it takes? i seen in a recipe it says 6-8 hours,but mine gets over rised in 3 hours,the dough collapsed when i do the finger poke test

3rd is how do i prevent free form dough from getting out of shape? i don have a banneton ,and i cant let it on a towel,because i am afraid it is too soft when i take it up and ruin the shape,so i poof it on my parchment paper 

lastly is my dough keep getting stuck to the parchment paper eventhough i flour and oil it, any tips on that?

hope you guys can hlp~appreciate it

cranbo's picture
cranbo

i am trying to make a wholewheat sourdough,so can i autolyse my whole wheat flour and water for awhile 1st?if yes how long and do i need to add my starter when autolysing?

Yes you can. You can do this as long as you want, but Reinhart recommends 12-24 hours at room temperature, and up to 3 days if you refrigerate. Reinhart calls these "soakers" and adds between between 1-2% salt to control enzyme activity. 

and about stretch and fold, my dough can stretch well and fold well, but the last step to turn it over often ruin it, because it keeps sticking to the table eventhough i keep flouring the table

Use vegetable oil or water on your hands and your work surface to prevent sticking. This is most effective if you want to keep from having to add additional flour to your dough maintain its hydration. If you don't want to use oil or water, consider doing your stretch and folds using a bench scraper to clean off all the sticky bits from your kneading surface. You can't really "ruin" your bread with stretch and fold; if it's sticky so be it. Much more important to shape your final dough well before baking. 

next is the 1st rise,how long does it takes? i seen in a recipe it says 6-8 hours,but mine gets over rised in 3 hours,the dough collapsed when i do the finger poke test

You may be talking about the 2nd rise (proofing)? I don't know anyone that uses the poke test during 1st rise (bulk fermentation). Your recipe could be wrong; pay more attention to your dough behavior and not your recipe. 1st rise should always almost (but not quite) double; that could be 1 hour or it could be 6 hours Use a clear container to measure the rise during bulk fermentation. You should always do 2 rises: 1st rise (bulk fermentation) after stretch and folding, and 2nd rise (proofing) after final dough shaping. 

3rd is how do i prevent free form dough from getting out of shape? i don have a banneton ,and i cant let it on a towel,because i am afraid it is too soft when i take it up and ruin the shape,so i poof it on my parchment paper 

Free-form dough will always get out of shape if it has high hydration; for example, you're not going to be able to shape an 78% hydrated bread into a tight cylinder and keep it that way without support! High hydration doughs will naturally sag, despite how much surface tension you can create on your dough thru shaping. Use something to support your dough: use a plastic or wicker basket of some kind, lined with well-floured cloth or parchment paper; or, if you're baking in a cast iron dutch oven, it's easy & convenient just to place the shaped dough in the dutch oven for the 2nd (proofing) rise. 

lastly is my dough keep getting stuck to the parchment paper eventhough i flour and oil it, any tips on that?

I've never heard of bread getting stuck to parchment after baking. You did say you are spraying the parchment with oil? What temp are you baking your bread, and for how long? Posting some photos should help with troubleshooting. 

Chuck's picture
Chuck

Quote:
...my dough keep getting stuck to the parchment paper...

Put the parchment paper right in the oven! That's the whole point of parchment paper; if it weren't going in the oven, plain old "wax paper" is a whole lot cheaper and works better.

Either proof the loaf on the parchment paper then scoop up the whole thing with your peel, or turn over your banneton onto a sandwich of peel and parchment paper, so either way you wind up with a three-layer sandwich: i) the peel, ii) the parchment paper, and iii) the dough. Then use the peel to slide the other two layers into the oven.

You'll find that bread comes unstuck from heated parchment paper very well. If you find yourself trying to unstick dough from parchment paper before it's been heated in the oven, stop and figure out what's gone wrong with the procedure.