The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

proofing in bannaton

tomsgirl's picture
tomsgirl

proofing in bannaton

I have a 8.5" bannaton which say's holds 1.5 lbs of dough. I'm thinking that perhaps I am not giving my loaves a long enough final proof. Should my 1.5lbs of dough fill the entire bannaton when done proofing? Typically I retard my dough over night in the fridge pull it out in the am and let it sit out for about 1.5 hours then bake.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Re: How much?

I just guesstimate, usually going with half full (i.e. I assume the final proof will occupy 1.5x to 2x the original volume of dough).

  • If I fill the banneton half full (.5) and the dough produces a 1.5x volume increase = (.5 x 1.5) = a 75% full banneton if the dough proofs to 1.5x it's original size.
  • If I fill the banneton half full (.5), and the dough produces a 2.0x volume increase = (.5 x 2.0) = a 100% completely full banneton if the dough proofs to 2.0x it's original size (doubles).

-=-

Re: Is it fully proofed?

Volume won't tell you if proofing is done, but it's a good estimate; neither will weight, which doesn't change much before the loaf is baked.

I use the very scientific "poke test" to test for proofing doneness:

  • If you poke the dough and it "pokes back" (the dimple doesn't stay dimpled), it needs more time to fully proof.
  • If you poke the dough and it doesn't "poke back" (the dimple remains for some time), it's fully proofed (or overproofed). That means put it in the oven posthaste.

Important note. I find this test to be of questionable value when dealing with retarded dough because the cold temperature changes dough elasticity such that it might stay dimpled when it's underproofed. Not very helpful that!

tomsgirl's picture
tomsgirl

My dimples have been filling in slowly but how slow is slow. I have two loaves in the fridge right now I will bake one as I normally do and the other I will let double 2x (fill the basket)and see what happens. Hmm kinda fun lol. Thanks for your input.~Happy Baking

Chuck's picture
Chuck

... banneton which say's holds 1.5 lbs of dough ... should my 1.5lbs of dough fill the entire banneton when done proofing?

Often bread equipment comes in "1 pound", "1.5 pounds", and "2 pounds" sizes. These don't mean a whole lot more than "small", "medium", and "large". The relationship to the actual weight of your dough is rather hazy. Pay attention to other things (like the "finger poke test"), rather than dough weight.

... typically I retard my dough over night in the fridge pull it out in the am and let it sit out for about 1.5 hours then bake. ...

When you pull dough out of the fridge, you may need to let it warm up a little for either of a couple reasons: i) so the "finger poke test" is easier to interpret, and ii) so the dough is more compliant and can be easly shaped into loaves. But otherwise there's no need to let it warm up at all - loaves that are already shaped and fully proofed (but not overproofed) can come out of the fridge and go immediately into the oven.

... my dimples have been filling in slowly but how slow is slow?

I use ten seconds. If the dimple fills "half way", it's neither underproofed nor overproofed.

tomsgirl's picture
tomsgirl

"loaves that are already shaped and fully proofed (but not overproofed) can come out of the fridge and go immediately into the oven".

I do my final shape and then immediatley put inside the fridge. My starter rises double/triple in about 6 hours sometimes less sometimes more but on average I'd say 6 hrs. My bulk ferment is 6 hrs I then shape and put in baskets . It's hard for me to tell when the dough is "double" when I do stretch and folds I can get a good idea though. Should my bulk ferment be shorter to get a better proof the next day?  

GermanFoodie's picture
GermanFoodie

does not need to be all the way full. Mine never are. As long as your dough is about 1/2 of the banneton before its final proofing, you should be fine.

We have done bread every which way you can imagine, and one of the things I have tried was to retard in proofing baskets over night, then let the dough come to room temperature before baking. Never a single problem.

tomsgirl's picture
tomsgirl

6am here took my first loaf out @ 530 im gonna try letting one double all the way its just flour and water! I'll post pics later. Both loaves were weighed out to 1.5lbs before putting them into the bannetons they did fill the basket almost half way with a bit of rising in the fridge over night not much. We shall see. Now off to make some Peanut Butter Swirl Bread for my sister she has her 3rd session of chemo tomorrow she's been having difficulties eating but she LOVES pb so thought its worth a shot wish me luck.

~Happy Baking!