The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

World Bread Day - another variation on Jan Hedh's Lemon bread

Salilah's picture
Salilah

World Bread Day - another variation on Jan Hedh's Lemon bread

I baked this yesterday - but we ate it today, so I hope that counts!

Another version of Jan Hedh's Lemon bread, with less lemon and added lemon thyme

Ingredients:
100g 100% white starter
180g durum flour
180g white strong flour
50g rye
130g water
100g cider
25g EVOO
8g salt
zest of half a lemon (would use more in future)
leaves from 6-8 sprigs lemon thyme (would use more in future)

Method:
Mix starter, flours, water, cider and autolyse 30m or so.  Add EVOO, salt, lemon zest, herbs - thorough mix
Several S&F roughly 30min intervals for 3 hours (you can tell I was improvising - poor records!)
Refridgeration overnight, then warmed up for around 30m then pre-shaped then shaped to batard
(warning: not sure if it was the EVOO but it was a pain to shape - wouldn't seal the seam!)
3 hours I think to proof in banneton, then 15mins under SS bowl at 240 then around 25-30m at 200

Good bread flavour; not very big holes but quite a soft crumb with quite thick crust.  Nice taste but would add more lemon & herbs next time!

and the crumb:

cheers - and Happy World Bread Day!
(buckwheat batard on the way - sadly no beechnuts as the birds beat me to it!)

S

Comments

lumos's picture
lumos

Beautiful looking, loaf, Sali!  Bet it tasted great, too.

Can I check one thing if I may?  Cider in the formula is our sort of cider in UK (alcohol one, a bit like larger), isn't it?  Not American sort of cider, which is apple juice?  How much of acidity of cider remain after baked?

lumos

Salilah's picture
Salilah

yes it was an alcoholic one - Henney's Dry Cider from Herefordshire (via Tesco) - 6% alcohol

Very little acidity or taste of cider in the bread- I like trying out various beers / ciders but haven't yet worked out how to adjust for the effect, if I use all cider (or beer) it tends not to rise so much I think...

cheers!

Sali

lumos's picture
lumos

Thanks!

So, does a different cider effect quite differently?  I bought a bottle of vintage cider last year for the purpose of making apple bread with it....and in the end I used it to cook pork....and drank what's left....:p

 

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Not sure how much of a difference it really makes - guess the only way is to bake 2 loaves at the same time, one with each type, and taste in comparison?

I think the stout I used previously did give a bit of flavour, but I haven't found the cider doing that much - I did try with cherry beer (kriek) and dried cherries, but the loaf itself didn't work too well...

Fun to experiment though!

codruta's picture
codruta

Nice looking bread, Sali! Interesting combination of flavours.

Looking forward to see your buckwheat batard, I hava an unopened bag of buckwheat and I don't know what to do with it. I'm not familiar with the taste. Maybe your batard will inspire me. :)

codruta

Salilah's picture
Salilah

The levain worked, but the dough then rose very very fast - and I let it overproof :-(  I think there's a theme developing here - I make up the levain, then find I've made too much, then use it all and reduce flour and water, then my bread develops too quickly, and --> another cowpat!

Even baking in tins didn't do much for it sadly!

And - then I forgot to put the timer on, so ended up overbaking as well!!!!

However - the taste works nicely - quite a rich flavour - and the crumb looks OK

If anyone wants to try this and get it more right (!):

Overnight levain - 50g starter (100%), 50g buckwheat, 50g water (I did about 70 of each)

Dough: should be 125g levain with 300g water, 450g white bread flour, 50g buckwheat, 10g salt.  I used 200g levain with 300g water, 280g bread flour, 45g buckwheat, 7g salt - so well over the proportion of levain for the rest!  oh well, continuing to learn...

 

 

 

HeidiH's picture
HeidiH

Read this thread this morning and got inspired to make a variation of this using what I had in the house, i.e. fresh (not hard) cider, yeast (I haven't been brave enough to take on starter care), and fresh rosemary instead of thyme.  Just tried a slice -- what a yummy, yummy loaf of bread!

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Glad it worked for you!  I'm missing rosemary - my plant died in last year's hard winter, and the various cuttings I've tried to grow on are not yet big enough to cut from :-(

Is the fresh cider what those in UK would call apple juice?  i.e. no alcohol?  I must try that - I'm not sure the alcohol necessarily helps (!)

HeidiH's picture
HeidiH

We distinguish between fresh cider and apple juice over here.  Apple juice is a very heavily filtered concoction whereas cider is cloudy and darker (unfiltered).   We're lucky here that a regional brand of cider is carried by a local grocery.  Wikipedia shows a good picture of the two: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_cider  I don't see why you couldn't use filtered apple juice instead but the flavor might be a bit different.  I'll take pictures of the result and post them a little later.  

If you were closer by, I'd say come and relieve my front yard of some rosemary!  It loves our South Carolina summer weather -- which is more than I can say for us humans.  We are delighted it has finally turned cool enough to open the windows!

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Thanks for the link - yes that makes sense!  We get very processed apple juice (lasts for ages), also sometimes less treated juice in bottles.  I've only seen the fresh cider at apple days - or when we remember to get the juicer out!  Sounds really nice, and I think would be a great flavour

I'm always interested by the difference for gardening between US and UK - I grow vegetables near Cambridge (UK), and we've had our first ground frost :-(  Some very unhappy courgette plants, and even inside the greenhouse it's been down to about 5C, which means the tomatoes are also nearly at an end.  Still - will be able to get our winter leaves going soon, covered in fleece (I think we're on about the same parallel as Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan and Seal Cove, Newfoundland (according to my winter harvest book)! - we don't get the snows so much usually, but we do get very short daylight during the winter...  Mediterranean herbs don't appreciate it much!)

HeidiH's picture
HeidiH

Half eaten already since yesterday -- a sign of good bread that's TOO good!

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Very nice!  So pleased it worked well for you!

all the best
Sali

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Salilah,
Such a beautiful loaf, and the addition of a lemon-scented herb is a great idea!
Happy World Bread Day to you!
:^) from breadsong


 

Salilah's picture
Salilah

and a very Happy World Bread Day to you too!

I will definitely try this one again, and increase the amount of herbs - you could see the leaves but not really taste them much (though admittedly we did have a very strong goats cheese with it for lunch, so that might also explain it!)...

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

Hi Sali

Is this the recipe you developed in Newcastle?  The bread certainly looks good.

Richard