The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Looking for a good whole grain sandwich bread for a baby

JIP's picture
JIP

Looking for a good whole grain sandwich bread for a baby

So I have been making all this free-form artisinal type bread all along but now I need a good whole grain sandwich bread.  My wife has just started feeding our 1yr old baby a little peanut butter sandwiches, just small pieces of one slice.  So now I need a good wholesom bread preferrably made in a loaf pan because the last thing i want to do is subject my baby to store bought bread. 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

This is hopefully a helpful comment from a nutritionist which you may already be aware of. When choosing the recipe for you baby's bread, it's best to start with a semi-white recipe using grains which are not too coarse, and slowly increase the coarser textured breads. Their little intestines have to be slowly introduced to coarser textures. Bought white and finely ground whole meal bread are risky when introducing bread to infants as they can form a sort of plug in their throats which either cause them to gag or feel pain when they swallow the bolus.

JIP's picture
JIP

Actually that is the problem I am having.  All the recipes I can find have very coarse grains in them with larger chunks that I assumed would cause difficulty.

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Would you consider using some kibbled wheat which you can reduce the particle size further in a food processor and soak it so that it is soft before you incorporate it into your bread dough?
If you like, I'll have a look through my copious recipes for something which you may find suitable. The evening has just all but finished here (NZ) but I'll be home from work to-morrow afternoon so will do a bit of research then. M

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Raising babies around Artisan bread loaves was new to me when I was a young mother.  I remember when those first teeth came and it was suggested that the ends are perfect!  Granted you brush off all the seeds, knock off any loose crust and round any sharp edges a little and it should be a few days old.  Never leave babies alone with food and bread is no exception.  Now you must understand that the ends are the favorite part of the loaf in my extended family but everyone is willing to sacrifice an end for a baby.  Even letting it dry out a bit.   It is a good way to learn to chew and tastes good too!  I found the fluffy sandwice bread tended to ball up and babies choked on it.  The denser bread when held by mom, babies tended to slobber and soften just the amount of crumbs they could swallow, I wouldn't go sticking tiny little pieces of bread in their mouth.   :)  Mini Oven

JIP's picture
JIP

No choking is not too much of a worry with her she has been the biggest fan of my bread fr a couple of months now.  As was previously said she slobbers on the crumb until it is soft enough and then she eats it.  She really enjoys a very crusty bread but now, as I said my wife has started to feed her PB on bread she cuts it up into small pieces and lets her eat it herself.  I did want something healthy but with a fine crumb and as I said I have a fairly large loaf pan I would like to use.

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Just got home and haven't gone to the books yet, JIP. In my early mothering days I gave the babies fingers of toast which they would bite pieces off with their new incisors. They seemed to manage bread better this way (complete with PB or Marmite and slobber). M

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Just got home and haven't gone to the books yet, JIP. In my early mothering days I gave the babies fingers of toast which they would bite pieces off with their new incisors. They seemed to manage bread better this way (complete with PB or Marmite and slobber). M

browndog's picture
browndog

You could take a good white sandwich bread recipe and substitute whole grain flour in about a 4-1 proportion. Oatmeal or flour, cornmeal, spelt, teff- do they still make triticale? I often make a soft 'porridge' by cooking whole millet, quinoa or other grain and adding that to my bread, maybe a 5-1 proportion to keep the bread light.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

A bit OT but I had to report: last year my niece was 10 months old at Easter and just starting solid food. She helped me knead some country french dough (stuck her hands in anyway!) and then had her first scrap of bread from the resulting loaf. This year she is learning to talk and my sister tells me she demands "toast" whenever she sees bread on the table. I think I fulfilled my duty as an uncle ;-)

sPh

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

does anyone remember it? A toast like biscuit/cookie for babies? I'm not sure what type of flour it was made with, but alot babies gnawed on them..well, at least in my day a millenium ago  :  )

maggie664's picture
maggie664

So that's what zwieback were. We called them rusks! They must have been made with a finely processed low gliuten flour. The sugar content was higher than that of bread though.

maggie664's picture
maggie664

So that's what zwieback were. We called them rusks! They must have been made with a finely processed low gliuten flour. The sugar content was higher than that of bread though.

maggie664's picture
maggie664

So that's what zwieback were. We called them rusks! They must have been made with a finely processed low gliuten flour. The sugar content was higher than that of bread though.

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

rusks!

my sister used to give them to her kids....

I never gave them to my daughter but this is 10 years ago now and my daughter is 5 soon.

but yeah rusks. They also have Farex cookies.......if you live in OZ. :)

 

thegreenbaker. 

browndog's picture
browndog

My recipe calls for 5 cups of ap flour to 1 cup of light rye, and 1/2 cup of sugar, as well as the ubiquitous '2 packages yeast'.

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

HOnestly, I'd go for something wholewheat. I use 100% wholewheat and I think it is great. Dont go putting all that sugar into it...thats just asking for diabeties. Especially from such a young age.....why not try spelt flour...wholemeal spelt flour. it makes bread a bit denser, you have to knead it for half the time but should be delicate on babies tummies.

 

I can suggest going to floydm's sandwhich loaf recipe in this site and substituting it with wholewheat spelt flour, maybe some half a cup of semolina flour and half a cup of rye flour. add a couple tablespoons of olive/rice bran oil.

It will probably make for a dense loaf, but nutritional and very tasty.

You could even play around with some soaked oats and put that into the dough as well. Why not!

I will strngly advise to not put sweetners into your bread...especially with babies and young children. It may add to the flavour, but if you use a preferment like in rustic loaf (also on this site) and the tastier flours like spelt flour and rye flour semolina gives a good flavour and extra texture then sugar wont be needed.

 

I will happily share my sandwhich loaf recipe with you if you want a straight out recipe. :)

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hello JIP,
I have found a recipe in Beth Hensberger's "The Bread Bible" which could be suitable for your toddler. I haven't made it myself but would have given it a go if my children were youngsters.

OATMEAL-BULGUR BREAD
Makes 3 round or 3 x 8in. by 4 in. loaves

Sponge
1 Tb active dry yeast
2 Tb light brown sugar
2/3 cup bulgur wheat, fine or medium ground
2-1/4 cups warm water (105ºF - 115ºF)
2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

Dough
1-1/4 cups regular rolled oats
1/4 cup wheat bran
1/4 cup light brown sugar
3 Tb vegetable oil
1 Tb salt
3 to 3-1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour or bread flour

A. To make the sponge:
In a large bowl or a the work bowl of a heavy duty electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, pour in the water. Sprinkle the yeast, 2 Tb brown sugar and the bulgur wheat over the surface of the water for and let stand for 5 minutes. Add 2 cups of the flour and beat hard until well moistened and creamy, about 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature until foamy, about 1 hour.

B To make the dough:
To the bowl with the sponge, add the rolled oats, bran, brown sugar, oil and salt. Beat hard for 1 minutes. add more flour, 1/2 cup at a time, and beat for another minute. add more flour, 1/2 cup at a time, and beat for another 1 minute, or until stretchy and well-moistened. add more flour, 1/2 cup at a time, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Switch to a wooden spoon when needed if mixing by hand.

C. Turn the dough out onto a lightly-floured work surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 4 minutes, dusting with the flour, 1 Tb at a time as needed to prevent sticking. (If kneading by machine, switch from the paddle to the dough hook and knead for 3-4 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and springy, and springs back when pressed. If desired, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead briefly by hand.

D. Place the dough in a greased deep container. Turn once to coat the top and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, 1-1/2 to 2 hours.

E. Gently deflate the dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Grease or parchment-line a a baking sheet or grease 3 x 8 by4 in. loaf pans. Divide the dough into 3 equal portions. Form each portion into a round or rectangular loaf and put on the baking sheet or on the loaf pans. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled in bulk, about 45 minutes.

F. 20 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 375ºF. Using a serrated knife, gently slash the top of the loaves no more than 1/4 in. deep. Place the baking sheet or pans on the rack in the centre of the oven and bake 35-40 minutes, or until the loaves are browned and sound hollow when tapped with your finger. Let the loaves cool in the pans for 5 minutes, then turn the loaves out immediately onto a cooling rack. cool completely before slicing.

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Maggie..thanks!! I made this today and it has the most incredible texture and flavor! My husband couldn't wait to slice into it !! I went grocery shopping and when I got back realized that I overproofed it..oh well. It didn't get the rise it should have the 2nd time..but man..it's good. Anadama, Struan and sourdough were always our favorite..hmmmm..I think we have a new one!! I can post pics, but I don't want to turn anyone off by their sorry look  :  )

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Thanks for that, Paddycake, I'll have to give it a go. What grade of bulghur wheat did you use?

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I used Bob's Red Mill and all it says is "whole grain bulghur wheat". It's really good!!