The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Vitamin C Method = super accelerated rising

sweetbombeet's picture
sweetbombeet

Vitamin C Method = super accelerated rising

Hey everyone,

I was just wondering if anyone else used the "Vitamin C Method" that I use for all my pizzas.  The ascorbic acid of the Vitamin C creates a reaction with the yeast that speeds up the rising process dramatically, cutting it down to only one short rise. 

Just curious.

joel

suave's picture
suave

When I want my pizza super fast I call Papa John's.

jcking's picture
jcking

My sourdough pizza dough (ala Reinhart) sits in the fridge for a day developing excellent flavors. Some think topping make a pizza (Papa John and others); I think not. It's all about the crust! A little plain tomato sauce and a little stinky cheese, now that's Italian!

Jim

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Given a choice, I go for the long autolyse or ferment.  

If you want to speed up dough, try combining flour and ingredients without the yeast and containerize it in refrigerator until you want it, preferably days later.  Add 2% instant or dissolved yeast to the dough two hours before you want to bake it giving it a bulk rise for finer gas dispersion, shape and use.  Add C if you like at the same time but to me that's a waste as the oven heat destroys vit C.

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Oi! yo! yoi!  You mean Papa Murphy's, right?  Sooo much better...

 

bd

 

 

Chuck's picture
Chuck

Plug "ascorbic acid" into the search box at the upper left to find a mention every once in a while. Ascorbic acid is a common ingredient in "dough enhancers", and is sometimes suggested for home baking, especially for whole wheat.

My own recent experience was buying a "mortar and pestle" so I could thoroughly grind up a vitamin C tablet into powder cost more than just buying ascorbic acid powder in bulk. (The amount needed by bread dough is quite small, so being able to thoroughly mix in a non-lumpy powder seems important.) Ascorbic acid is also a relatively common ingredient in workout supplement mixes, enough so that there's a good market to the mix-your-own folks, which us bakers can piggy-back on it.

I'm curious: can you describe the gory details of the specific method you use? (While the ingredient is well-known to home bakers, the exact method may be less so:-)

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Note:  Your local beer brewer's supply shop is a great source for powdered ascorbic acid (Vit. C)...

 

bd

 

 

sweetbombeet's picture
sweetbombeet

Hi Chuck,

I actually get powdered vit. C now, instead of the tablets = yes, much more convenient.

What I do is mix the yeast, vit. C and sugar in warm water and let sit for a few minutes. 

'Then I toss it in the blender with a bit of salt and oil and blend for 20 seconds or so.

Mix with flour, roll and shape, sprinkle cornmeal on the pan (I prefer this over oil), and lay dough on pan. 

I actually don't wait for it to rise at all - I just lay my toppings on and bake!  I like different kinds of crust, but lately the thin and crispy has been doin' it for me.

Thanks for your interest! 

joel

sweetbombeet's picture
sweetbombeet

Thanks everyone, for all your input!  I appreciate it.  My next baking adventure is actually going to be with Kefir.  I am sure many people here have taken a walk in the deep, dark Kefir forest, and I'll be checkin' out what's up.

Ahh, delicious crusts!  Luscious loaves!  The tantalizing textures of baking . . . a magical blend of art and science.  I'm lovin' it!

cgmeyer2's picture
cgmeyer2

i love kefir. i buy it to drink. i also buy powdered kefir to use in my yogurt maker.

please share your kefir recipe experiences.