The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

September’s Baking 2011

ananda's picture
ananda

September’s Baking 2011

September’s Baking 2011

 The new job is proving to be very demanding, as I should have anticipated!   A last minute appointment in a very busy baking school inevitably means there is a lot to do.   And staying in Leeds for 2 nights, away from home, is not easy to adapt to, even though I have been made so welcome by friends who offered me a place nearby to stay when this job first became a real possibility.   It will remain difficult for Alison and me to deal throughout the year, for sure.

On the bread front, I have made the following breads, in addition to the Kamut ® loaves recently posted.

A Borodinsky mainly following Auerman’s techniques, but using crushed roasted barley instead of crystal barley malt powder, as posted here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24237/celebrating-rye-breads   I wondered if it may prove to have a burnt, or, bitter taste to it, but the flavour was really lovely in the finished bread.   I used Organic Rye Flakes as a topping on the bread rather than freshly ground coriander seeds.

 

Borodinsky using a “Scald”

Makes 1 “Pullman Pan”

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough 2 refreshments, 80g stock

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

300

Water

50

500

TOTAL

80

800

 

 

 

2. “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

20

200

Crushed Roasted Barley

4.5

45

Organic Blackstrap Molasses

6

60

Coriander Seeds-ground

1

10

Salt

1

10

Water

35

350

TOTAL

67.5

675

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from above]

80

800

Scald [from above]

67.5

675

Bacheldre Organic DarkRye Flour

25

250

Gilchesters Organic Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

25

250

TOTAL

197.5

1975

Overall Hydration

85%

-

Pre-fermented Flour

30%

-

FACTOR

10

-

 

Gilchesters Miche

The good news is that the wood-fired oven fired really well today.   I had to hand-mix over 5kg of dough first thing this morning.   This is quite a challenge with weak Northumbrian flour and hydration at 78%!   The 1 hour autolyse is essential, then gently working the dough on the bench to develop the gluten over a lengthy time period also makes life easier.   I used 2½ hour bulk with one S&F before scaling, dividing and shaping.   I made 2 loaves scaled at 1660g and 2 at 835g.   Final proof was a further 2½ hours.   I baked out the bigger loaves for just short of 1 hour.   More detail on this formula is available here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24911/gilchesters-miche-and-borodinsky-bread and 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23811/miche-using-stiff-levain-and-gilchesters-organic-farmhouse-flour

In the meantime I built a really good fire in the oven.   Once “scuffled” out, the oven settled at around 300°C, with the top heat radiating from the curved roof particularly effectively.  

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Refreshed Leaven, 3 refreshments from 40g stock

 

 

Total Flour [Carrs Special CC]

27

756

Total Water

16

448

TOTAL

43

1204

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven

43 [27 flour, 16, water]

1204

Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse Flour

73

2044

Salt

1.79

50

Water

62

1736

TOTAL

179.79

5034

% pre-fermented flour

27

-

% overall hydration

78

-

FACTOR

28

-

 

Lots of photographs are attached.

Top heat reading from the roof of the oven; Infra Red laser point thermometer

Bottom heat reading after one hour of baking, with the oven door ajar for 10 minutes

                                                                                                                  Thin Cell Walls, above

and the finished crumb, close-up, below:

 

I’m finding it quite difficult to keep up with everyone’s posts on TFL at the moment with my midweek schedule journeying to Leeds and back.   Apologies if I’ve not kept in touch with everyone’s baking activities.

All good wishes

Andy

Comments

wally's picture
wally

Busy schedule, but it looks like you're making good use of your re-jiggered wfo. Maybe you and SylviaH should do a road show for wfo aficionados!

So tell me, were you actually baking these at 300 C? That works out to about 570 F - pretty hot.

Best wishes on the new position,
Larry

lumos's picture
lumos

For a few years until last summer, my husband used to have to travel to his office in Germany and stay there for 2-3 days every week, so I understand how the life split in two can be very tiring and sometimes stressful for you and Alison,  especially in the beginning when both your brain and body are trying to adjust to the new way of life.   All the sympathy for you two.

 Just please do take care of yourself, and hopefully the new work place and the new WFO will give you a lot of joy and vitality to keep you motivated. ;)

best wishes,

lumos

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi lumos,

Indeed, the oven is my passage to "the future".   I have to keep a hold of this so we can see working in Leeds as the means to an end.   The world of Education can become so all-encompassing and given both Alison and I work in the same field it is all too easy to get sucked too far in.   Thanks for re-inforcing what we have to do to avoid that!

Bake lovely bread at home, of course!

Very best wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

I'm known for firing my ovens hard Larry!

Yes, I dared to load these large Miche at 300*C!!!

Really good to hear from you, as I gather your workload is more demanding than mine

All good wishes

Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I'm having such a great time seeing your WFO "Pretty Hot" bakes. Great looking oven and fire photos and Gorgeous miches, Andy!  They browned so beautifully.  

I know your very busy and I appreciate the time you take to post.  Thank you, Andy :) 

I wish the very best and brightest future to you and yours.

Sylvia

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you so much for your kind words Sylvia.

I enjoy your owen posts about your oven adventures just as much....and the same for yozza, just down under too

Very best wishes

Andy

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you for continuing to post these beautiful breads, Andy.  The Borodinsky continues to inspire, and the miches look incredible! 

Marcus

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Marcus,

Thank you very much for your kind words

Best wishes to you

Andy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Andy very nice bread and post there

great looking fire too looks like a nice piece of bannister creating some good heat, did you use the foil to protect the base of the loaves or for ease

of peeling into the oven.

regards yozza

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Derek,

Many thanks for your comments.

I began using foil to protect the base of the loaves from contamination with dirt.   Firing the beast properly had become so difficult that I did not want to scuffle it out too thoroughly for fear of losing all the heat.   Now the oven is firing properly, so I really used the foil to prevent a burnt bottom.   It worked, but ut tends to stick to the base of the loaf somewhat and is a bit of a pain to scrape off.   Scuffling with an old mophead proved very effective.

Yes, the house opposite was recently renovated and I went through the skip and claimed all the wooden frames from the windows and joists as you noticed.   It's so good to get this up and running properly

All good wishes

Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

 You might check next time at the market. Works great for my sticky chicken wings!

Sylvia

lumos's picture
lumos

double post. deleted

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Sylvia,

Thanks for the tip, I'll ask one of the chef's when I get into work; they will know where I can pick this up

BW

Andy

lumos's picture
lumos

Andy, we have non-stick foil in UK, too, from any major supermarkets.  Or if the temperature is below 260C or so, reusuable baking sheet/oven liner could be the solution.

lumos

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Andy! I really admire the passion that drives you to bake on your time off, while being a dedicated baking instructor! Talk about true passion!

I sympathize with you on being parted from your wife, but i hope it all ends up soon. Your Bakes are wonderful as usual, Andy! even more so considering the weak northumberland flours.

I wish you all the best! 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid,

Many thanks for yhour words of support and encouragement.

After all the uncertainties of the Summer just past, I am encouraged to do all I can to ensure I can always make a living for myself...and the oven is a big asset in that regard!

Very best wishes

Andy

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Andy, it really shows what a huge difference a proper baking can make! but tell me: how long does the heat persists when you tur off the oven? You could use the residual heat very effectively... you know how!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Nico,

Yes indeed; we always used to bake cakes on the dead oven at Village Bakery.   Somehow I don't think that's where you are leading me, however.   I really should use the cool oven for trips to the dark side, shouldn't I??

I really do love the bake of these loaves!

Very good to hear from you, as always

Best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

Andy,  After seeing yet another fabulous bake, it's finally occuring to me that it would be nice to try to make your gilchester miche.   Only no gilchester flour thisaways.   I am going to study your past posts and try to figure out what I can do to approximate.    I'm so glad that you are able to find time to post and continue to participate in TFL.   I have in the past travelled a lot for work including over a year where my job was in New York City and I was 2 nights there every week.   I know how hard it can be on both oneself and family.   But we have to make a living and so it goes.   -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

The nearest equivalent I can think of to the Gilchester flour which you could use would be the Atta flour.   You should sift it first to try to take it down to around 85% extraction.   Not exactly the same, but high protein and poor gluten quality and high extraction; the nearest approximation I can think of.

Thank you very much for your support and re-assurance regarding the difficulties of working schedules

Very best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

Andy,   Thanks for the recommendation.   I'll give it a shot.  -Varda

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,

Thanks for taking the time from you're hectic schedule to post on your latest WFO bake, it's greatly appreciated! So good to see you enjoying the rejigged oven and all the great breads you're able to do in it. 300C... Yikes! That's eyebrow crisping temperature if you're not careful, but just what you want for doing these lean breads. The crust of your bread is ample evidence of the benefits of high temperature baking, and I'm sure the flavour bears this out as well.

The crushed roasted barley you've used in this latest Borodinsky sounds like the solution I've been looking for if I'm ever to make this bread. I've had no luck trying to source crystal malt locally. One of the disadvantages of living in a small town I'm afraid, but barley is readily available at the local health food store. Thanks for sharing this info Andy!

It's difficult sometimes doing what's needed to keep employed, but better that than the alternative, something I say to myself often during my commute. I can well imagine how trying your situation must be for the both of you, even with lots of moral support from family and friends.

All the best Andy,

Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Franko,

I wrote a long and rambling reply to you yesterday evening on the train on the way back from Leeds.   Alas I lost the internet connection just as I was uploading the message, and lost the whole lot!

Anyway, I was going on at great length about firing rolls in the VB ovens at 360*C with doors and dampers open and someone on hand to help me catch all the trays after a little under 5 minutes in the oven!?

I'm planning to re-try the Pane Nero di Castelvetrano over the weekend.   I reckon I'll be able to darken off the crust this time!

The roasted barley I used is malted, but I've also seen the unmalted version.   Flavour-wise, think Guinness!!

Thank you so much for your encouragement and supporting words; they are always appreciated

Very best wishes

Andy

kim's picture
kim

Hi Andy,

I had a very hectic summer so I didn’t read anything from here (for a long time). It is great to see your post again; I’m saving your older post on my computer for later reading. My friend bought me a bag of Gilchesters Organic Farmhouse flour; I used your recipe to bake a batch of miche. They turned out great; I really love the overall flavor. I didn’t take any picture (too busy) since I was baking at my friend house using her WFO. Thank you again for the recipe. I will pass your foil method to my friend since she is also very worry about burnt bottom every time she uses her WFO. Don’t need to reply my comment since I’m traveling to different part of the countries for my job too, I can understand your busy schedule. I wish all the best to you.

Thanks,

Kimmy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Kimmy,

It's really good to hear from you.   I'm so pleased you managed to bake successfully with the formula and the Gilchester flour.

Regarding the foil, I would look at what Sylia and lumos have advised in their comments above: very sound.

All good wishes

Andy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Andy,

Fantastic loaves, as always!   I love the crust color and shape of the boules that was baked by your WFO. 

I wish I could taste some of yours, that were used special ingredients by you, who are knowledgeable.

I hope you and Alison can find a best solution that both of you can take sometimes to relax..

I also thank you posting the great bread,

Akiko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Akiko,

It is very good to hear from you and I really appreciate your geneorous comments and support

As always, best wishes to you

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Andy,
Your breads are wonderful (as always!) and boy can that WFO really turn up the heat (those miches have a gorgeous crust)!
The crushed roasted barley must add some great flavor. I should try to find some.
I hope you are enjoying your new teaching position and that the travelling is not too hard for you both.
:^) from breadsong

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi breadsong

Thank you so much for your kind and generous comments.   You are always welcome here, however late.

My brother's work on the oven has been very effective and it is great to achieve and retain heat like this within the brick structure now.

The travelling to Leeds is ok, but it will take a while to adapt to working away from home for sure.   I just hope it all works out in the end.

Very best wishes

Andy