The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

XVII – Pain Rustique with Parmesan and Green Soya Beans

lumos's picture
lumos

XVII – Pain Rustique with Parmesan and Green Soya Beans

 This is my version of bread which became very popular in Japan some years ago.  Apparently some Italian restaurant in Tokyo started serving this some years ago and it became so popular,  other restaurants and bakers followed suit, so did home bakers.

 It’s basically basic French lean dough made with small amount of yeast and long, cold retardation, filled with young green soya beans or young broad beans and  Pecorino or Parmesan.  It would’ve be  more ‘Italian’ if you use broad beans, but 'edamame' (枝豆 = young soya beans) version seems to be slightly  more popular there; a sort of French got married to Italian by Japanese matchmaker. :p

  My verson uses same dough as my regular baguette dough (Hamelinet poolish baguette).  To that, I add about 60-70g young soya beans (frozen. Defrosted) and 30-40g Parmigiana Reggiano (chopped small) by scattering them over the dough when letter-folding the dough twice to shape it into a pave just before the dough goes into the final proof. 

Sometimes I bake it large like that, in that case in a pre-heated Pyrex casserole with a lid on for 20 minutes @ 240C and another 20 minutes without a lid @ 200C, like this......

(Using a Pyrex casserole upside down, the lid as a cover)

 

Other times, I cut it into 6 small pieces, like petite paves (no need to shape. just cut it with sharp bench knife),  bake them for 10 minutes @ 240C with steam on hot baking stone and 10-12 minutes more without steam @ 200C, as it's always done in Japan.  (For some reason, they seem to think that sort of roughly cut small rolls, like petite pave are called ‘rustique.’  Another case of something lost in translation….:p) 

 

And these are how they look like….

A large pave

 

 

This large one was for my friend, so no crumb shot, but here’s the petite pave version I baked a few weeks ago for ourselves…..of which I only remembered to take a photo after I sliced into the last remaining piece. Blame my brain….

 

Note :  You can adjust the amount of soya/broad beans and cheese to your liking, of course, but please try not to  over-load with cheese too much.  Cheesy note is supposed to be in the background of this bread as a contrast to bring out the delicate sweetness of flavour and aroma of young beans, not to overwhelm it.  The beans are in the leading role and the cheese is there to support it.

 

 lumos

Comments

GaryJ's picture
GaryJ

Great looking loaf lumos. A new one on me.
As luck would have it, I currently have some young soya beans in the freezer and some parmesan in the fridge. Think I will give it a whirl when I get the chance.

Cheers,

Gary

lumos's picture
lumos

Hi, Gary. Thank you. :)

Yes, please do try. You'll let me know how you got on, won't you? Hope you like it.

lumos

 

varda's picture
varda

Your loaf certainly looks dramatic with the bright green soy beans.   Interesting how people throw in their own spin to something old and create something completely new.   Very nice!  -Varda

lumos's picture
lumos

Thanks, Varda! 

My friend likes it as a large pave but we prefer it as petit pave though it's less dramatic. You get more crust like that which is rather tasty. ;)

lumos

 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

What beautiful color all around and crumb looks fabulous! 

Sylvia

lumos's picture
lumos

Thank you, Sylvia!

It's so much easier to get open crumb with lots of large holes like that with a smaller roll like that, as you probably know.  Wish my baguette crumb were always like that, too. p

lumos

Franko's picture
Franko

Interesting loaf lumos. I never would have thought of using beans, edamame or otherwise in a bread, but then I remembered having a salad in a restaurant once that had edamame, lemon zest, olive oil, etc, and parmigiano. It was wonderful! Thanks for sharing this flavour idea and as well the photos of the terrific looking crumb you achieved. Very nice!

Franko

lumos's picture
lumos

Hi, Franko!

Thank you very much for your kind words. 

I think the salad you had was inspired by popular Italian antipasti/salad in recent years, using, again, young broad beans.  Spanish has very similar dish, too, with Spanish cheese, like Manchego, instead of Parmigiana.  I love tthem, too.  One of my favourite salad for early summer when those young beans are in season.  I'm pretty sure a baker who 'created' this bread got the inspiration from those salad. (Italian is the most popular 'Western' cuisine in Japan for many years) 

Those salad sometimes have some sort of charcuterie mixed in; like thinly sliced Parmaham, Serrano/Iberico ham, chopped (and sometimes fried) salami or chorizo.  I think you this combination is quite adoptable to this bread, too.;)

lumos

 

 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi lumos,
As we head into fall here, the gorgeous light green color, and shape, of your edamame remind me
of the tender new leaves of spring!
Beautiful bread - thank you for sharing the ideas and photos.
:^) from breadsong

 

lumos's picture
lumos

Hi, breadsong! Thank you very much. :)

Yeah, I know it's a bit out of season. :p  As I said to Franko, above, young broad beans and Parmigiana salad is one of my favourite salad in early summer, which I only eat it in seaon.   But thanks to frozen edamame and young broad beans readily availabe these days,  I quite often bake this throughout the year mainly because my friend's family loves it and order it very often.   Also my daughter wanted to have it before she sets off for university next week, so been baking this quite a few times in past few weeks.

Hope you'll like it, too. :)

lumos

Syd's picture
Syd

Oh my, that is an excellent looking loaf Lumos.  And, although I am no stranger to soy beans, I have never seen them used in bread before.  This is, yet, another ingredient I want to try.  Thank you Lumos for  adding more to my already unattainable 'to do' list!  (Cue sarcasm smiley, here). :)  Excellent crumb and I love the colours.

Best,

Syd

lumos's picture
lumos

Hi, Syd!

You mean this bread hasn't  invaded to your neck of the woods yet? That's new, isn't it? :p  I was already in UK when this bread was 'invented,' so I don't have a first hand experience of what the phenomena was like there, but at one stage virtually every bread blogger in Japan was blogging about this bread, whether it's bought from a shop or ate at a restraunt or baked themselves.  

Please do try this, BEFORE it's got buried in the depth of your humongous 'to bake' list. I have the same file just as big as yours, so I know you'd need a major excavation work once anything is buried in that abyss!  ::pushing back as a retariation of Arlo's bread::   :p

lumos

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Great looking bread, Lumos! Brilliant usage of a Pyrex casserole! This bread should taste great , i'am sure!

lumos's picture
lumos

Good morning, Khalid!  Thanks for your kind words.

Yes, I can't live without my Pyrex.   It's so easy to use (upside down), no need for generating steam at all and unlike cast iron or Dutch oven,  you can see how your dough grows in the oven! :) 

I have two each of round banettons and round Pyrex casseroles plus two each of oval banettons and oval Pyrex that are perfect size for 500-700g dough.   All my large loaves are baked in those. (that's why all my loaves look the same outside. :p) 

  The loaf in the picture above is much smaller, so I wasn't sure if it work, but glad it did.

lumos

wally's picture
wally

Very creative in terms of ingredients and I love the crumb shot.  Feast for the eyes and the mouth.

Nice bake,

Larry

wally's picture
wally

Very creative in terms of ingredients and I love the crumb shot.  Feast for the eyes and the mouth.

Nice bake,

Larry

lumos's picture
lumos

Thank you, Larry, for the kind words. :)

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi lumos,

a really interesting combination of ingredients with a soft white crumb and crispy fine crust.

Lovely bread

Best wishes

Andy

lumos's picture
lumos

Thank you, Andy. :)

The crumb is not that soft, actually. It has a slight 'chew' to it, maybe due to combination of long fermentation and chopped Parmigiana. ;)

lumos

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Very nice looking bread - and yes the recipe is definitely new to me!  I keep the frozen soya beans in the freezer as I use them a lot with pasta - sadly I don't grow enough broad beans to use them this way (they get munched too quickly!)

Will give it a go
thanks for the idea!

Salilah

lumos's picture
lumos

Hi, Sali!

I always keep frozen soya beans, too, because it's a really good friend for us, women. ;)

Please let me know how you liked it when you try it. ;)

lumos

varda's picture
varda

Latest big study says no effect whatsoever.    Oh well.  -Varda

lumos's picture
lumos

Really?  Was the study about this particular alleged effect of soya beans?

Soybeans contain hormone-like substances called phytoestrogens that mimic the action of the hormone oestrogen. Health benefits for menopausal women

It's been widely said the reason women in Far East don't suffer  from menopausal symptoms so much is because we eat a lot of soy bean products. I've been to see gynecologist several times last year and he found a symptom that shouldn't be happening to a woman of  my age, especially after a certain major operation, which he couldn't find a reason for it.  The first thing he wanted to know was if I eat a lot of soya beans.

Oh well..... even if that's proven to be a complete myth, I still like eating soya beans. ;)

lumos

varda's picture
varda

but after I read about the study I gave up my plans for changing my diet to include large amounts of soy beans.   IIRC the women who were treated with soy did worse than the control group.  But enough of this - I bake bread to help me forget about issues like this.  -Varda

lumos's picture
lumos

I've read excessive intake of soya is not good because it may raise the uric acid level.  But you're right, let's forget about all those depressing stuff and enjoy our food! :)

lumos

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Lumos, I like your bread. I thought that the grey points were peases and I guess I'll try your recipe with them rather than soy ( that I don't love).

Seeing how well you use it I bought a lidded pyrex just like yours. I hope to get the same good results.

lumos's picture
lumos

Thanks , Nico!

Once I realised I was out of soya beans, so tempted to use green peas instead but didn't, thinking its distinctive aroma may crash with Parmigiano.  Very interested to hear how it works, though.  Let me know the result, won't you? ;)

Yep! Pyrex definitely works!  I think you'll find it much easier to use than cast iron pot. Good luck!

lumos