The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New cane baneton

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Creative Cakes's picture
Creative Cakes

New cane baneton

Hello,
I need some help with cane banneton. I bought a new cane banneton not long ago and I try to use this today to prove my bread, my dough rises perfectly but when I try to put it on the peel, some of the dough is stuck to the cane. What
do I have to do to make it not stick to the dough?

Cheers

freerk's picture
freerk

lightly flour it with rice flour (or plain flour if you don't have that) before putting the dough in :-)

Freerk

kerrymay's picture
kerrymay

I bought one from Amazon - it doesn't stick event if I don't bother oiling it.  Could it be that your dough is too moist?

lumos's picture
lumos

You shouldn't really oil your banetton because it'll go rancid. Just a generous sprinkle of flour (rice flour is the best, as Freerk said. If not, rye flour is almost as good) should do the trick. 

If that fails, try ground rice  or semolina mixed 50:50 with plain flour.

 

Pharnzworth's picture
Pharnzworth

I've often wondered why no one has marketed a teflon coated "banneton". It could either be a sheet metal bowl with cane shaped formations formed into it, or teflon coated metal tubing coiled in the same way as a normal banneton. Not that this helps you with your problem. :)

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

http://bakerybits.co.uk/1kg-2lb-Dishwashable-Rectangular-Banneton-P1084632.aspx

I haven't tried them - I'm a happy user of cane bannetons and (very cheap) bamboo baskets.

Juergen

Pharnzworth's picture
Pharnzworth

Interesting. I'd think that polypropylene would be a lot less sticky than cane but I still wonder - why not teflon?

freerk's picture
freerk

Great idea. I've seen them  pressed out of paper pulp, with the "fake coil". They are also less prone to sticking, or so I have been told.

Creative Cakes's picture
Creative Cakes

Thanks for the information. Really appreciate it.

lumos's picture
lumos

I've always thought there's a good reason why banettons are made in natural material like cane or wicker. Isn't it better if the surface is a bit porous so that it absorbs excess moiture from the dough?  Otherwise the surface of the dough can get 'sweaty' while proofing, making it more sticky and harder to score when turned out. Or is this a myth I created in my head???

I've seen a brotform made of wood pulp somewhere, too. I think it was one of German sites for baking goods. 

::visualising Freerk taking our his credit card::

:p

 

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

Yes, the cane absorbs moisture.