The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine starter.

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hmmngbrd's picture
hmmngbrd

Tartine starter.

I started my starter on Sunday Sept 11. It was bubbling on Monday but without the tart smell I expected. I left it. Tuesday it was flat.

Today is Wednesday and it is still flat with dingy liquid on top. No bubbles at all.

What did I do wrong?

ST8

jcking's picture
jcking

Are you feeding it?

Jim

sheffield's picture
sheffield (not verified)

Agree with Jim.  It's hungry.

Ford's picture
Ford

I agree. Feed it, at least once a day. It will not be mature in less than 2-4 weeks, but may be used after 2 weeks. If it has an off, unpleasant odor, don't worry -- just keep feeding. When it gets acidic, the off odor will disappear.
Ford

percello's picture
percello

Patience is key.  I don't know about the bubbles after only 24 hrs, but magic should happen by Day 4.  When developing a starter via the Tartine method, you're not supposed to feed it every day.  You're supposed to wait for the bubbles to appear, typically by Day 4 or so.  Then, and only then, it is time to start the first feeding.  (Refer to pages 45-46 of your book)

hmmngbrd's picture
hmmngbrd

You were so right! The fourth day is the charm. Last night, after reading the several emails I got (thank you all by the way). I went in the kitchen and peeped under the tea towel and there they were. bloop, bloop, bloop. You could watch them rise. I covered the crock and went to bed.

This morning I looked again and had a full head of bubbles. I fed it this AM and will feed it again in the AM.

A few years back, I was pretty good with the potato flake sourdough starter and had tried to work with the flour based starter without success. I was pretty hesitant to try flour again but am glad I did.

Again, thanks for all your comments.

ST8

hmmngbrd's picture
hmmngbrd

It is just beautiful, the starter that is. I poured off a full pint jar and fed the remainder. I just could not throw the starter that I poured off away.

I decided to use it as the liquid for my regular(almost regular)  Saturday loaves. I mix my loaves in my bread machine and let them rise in the bucket. I knead and shape the dough by hand and let them rise the 2nd time in the stoneware pans. I added no yeast but did add a little EVOO and a touch of sugar. I let it rise longer than usual only because I had somewhere to go. It is on the second rise right now. 

ST8 

Ford's picture
Ford

Sourdough is slower than commercial yeast, so do not be discouraged by a two hour rise.  Also, your starter is still VERY YOUNG.

Ford

djeffsmith's picture
djeffsmith

I can not throw away starter either.  I pour mine into a covered bowl in the fridge, then once a week make pizza dough from it.  Depending on how much starter I have accumulated I add olive oil, salt and all purpose flour then knead until it is to the consistancy I like.  I let it double, then punch it down prior to dividing it up to 9oz doughs.  These freeze beautifully and thaw in the fridge in a day.