The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello from North Carolina

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David Hall's picture
David Hall

Hello from North Carolina

Hello, everyone. I've been visiting TFL for a couple of years, but I decided it's time to join in and introduce myself. I've been baking bread off and on for about 15 years. Honestly, my favorite breads are the old-style French baquettes and boules.

I've recently started baking boules on a pizza stone on my ceramic grill (Big Green Egg, for those familiar with ceramic cookers. That's some of the best bread I've ever tasted. The boules taste just like the French countryside.

BakerBen's picture
BakerBen

Hey,

I see you are located in Durham - I am in Raleigh.  I am sure you will enjoy the folks on this site - many folks with a lot of knowledge and also willing to share it.  Your bread sounds delicious - people always want to see photos - both hole loaf and then the "crumb" shot.  I have heard of people using the BIG Green Egg as you are with similar results - I assume it really holds the heat once it is fired up.  What are you firing it with - charcoal or wood - how does it affect the flavor of the bread?   I will be interested to hear.  Again, welcome. 

Ben

David Hall's picture
David Hall

Hey, Ben. Thanks for the nice welcome. Yes, the Big Green Egg is remarkable. You can heat it up to at least 800F to cook a nice, thick steak, or you can hold it at 225F for 12 hours to slow-cook a pork shoulder. I generally do my loaf breads at around 550F, flatbreads (carta da musica, etc) at 350-400F, and pizza at 600-650F.

I use a combo of hardwood charcoal and hickory chunks for meats, pizza, and flatbreads. Loaf breads do best with just charcoal because of the longer cooking time. Otherwise, the wood smoke becomes a bit overpowering.

Ford's picture
Ford

We do have quite a few bakers following TFL that live in NC.  I live in Raleigh!

Ford