The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

The ensaimada revisited - time lapse video

freerk's picture
freerk

The ensaimada revisited - time lapse video

With no possible way of leaving the house because of continuous rain and thunder... what better to do than to see your bread rise in the oven!

In this episode I revisit the ensaimada, that I got to know this spring when visiting Ibiza for a week (without a doubt completely by coincidence also pouring with rain for the biggest part of my stay there). It's a nice challenge for all of you out there who like to have a go at laminated dough, Mallorca-style! Interesting technique, and ingredients as well!

Have a look and let me know what you think!

I'm trying to teach myself and find a format to make these short 7 minute instructional videos work, for me as well as for the viewer. My aim is to, within reasonable time, be able to make at least 2 or 3 of these a week (weather and working schedule permitting of course). I love to get feedback on what you guys notice, miss, feel, what your associations are, whether it is clear enough, all those things :-)

I hope you enjoy watching BREADLAB - ENSAIMADAS as much as I loved making it,

Freerk

 P.S. You would do me a big favor endorsing my BreadLab iniative. Every "like" will get me closer to realizing a 6 episode documentary/road movie; chasing the best bread Europe has to offer. Thanks in advance!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Great video! Good to see the ensaimada in action. I had forgotten how much I like making this bread :-)

Do think it is a great asset to see the rolling technique on video, as you show it here. That is the part I found the hardest to work out from pictures alone. You got that one beautifully thin! Lovely rise in the oven, also. 

Many thanks too for the credit. Glad to have been able to exchange information and inspiration on this appetising bread.

Best wishes, Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

Thank you for your kind words D!

I'm thinking of bringing it with me for the get together, but then with filling of course ( oh if I could only find that darn cucuburitittitato, or what was the name of that squash again :-)

Freerk

Crider's picture
Crider

I can't wait to try this. I can imagine drizzling some warmed honey on a piece.

freerk's picture
freerk

o yes, that will definitely work! You might even work in some crushed walnuts into the rim! Great, going to try the honey next time!

 

Freerk

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Freerk, I loved the video! So well made and absolutely delightful. I guess I am a visual learner-you make it look do-able! Your work surface is spacious,also. I have a similarly sized granite surface and I may have to try my hand at laminated doughs this Christmas. Oiling the surface and using the edge look essential to the process.

I have never had ensaimada but I wonder if it is ever filled? Jam?Sugar/cinnamon? Looks quite delicious as is to have with a cup of great coffee or even a delightful tea.

Thank you and keep them coming!

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Clazar!

Thank you for your kind words!

I'll be doing a "laminated dough-trial" the coming weeks, so come back for more whenever you feel like it. My first batch of croissants is chilling in the fridge by now:-)

Ensaimadas do indeed come with a wide variety of fillings, the most traditional being the "caballo de angel". I've made a variation on that with simple pumpkin, 'cause I couldn't get hold of the necessary squash. But chocolate, or anything fruity will work very, very nice!

When looking around for recipes, be aware that the philippine versions, although called ensaymada as well, have a different, more bready texture. There they also eat them more savoury, with cheese for instance!

The coming three weeks my better half will be travelling, so I guess I'll churn out quite some new baking videos! I'll keep you posted!

Freerk

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Freerk,

Very nice video, well paced, well edited, interesting, entertaining, informative, clever and appropriate music......who could ask for more?

Jeff

striperguy's picture
striperguy

Your technique would not produce a correct ensaimada. Once the dough is spread out on the table to form the pastry, a thin layer of non-hydrogenated lard is spread out on the dough as seen in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d26r18xWPMY

I can see by the picture of your finished ensaimada that it is not nearly wispy, fluffy, and light enough.

Also, not sure why you use vegetable oil.

Finally the term for lard in Mallorquin is saim, not saima as you state in your video. The name of the pastry, translated into English means literally "enlarded."

freerk's picture
freerk

Thank you for your honest opinion. I do believe I put lard in my ensaimada though. Maybe if you watch the video you can spot it. I'm looking forward to your version of it! Cheers.