The Fresh Loaf

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Pan de Horiadaki - Not really

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varda's picture
varda

Pan de Horiadaki - Not really

Last night we returned from two weeks on vacation to an empty refrigerator and no bread whatsoever.   While traveling, I did not rush around looking at bakeries, sampling the fine local breads, searching for flour, or any other such thing.   The only homage to bread I inflicted on my family was a wee bit of shopping for baskets.   First I bought a basket which I had a vague notion I would proof bread in.   Yet as soon as I made my purchase, I realized that I would never, never pollute it with flour and wet dough and suchlike:

Which meant that I needed another basket for proofing.  This eventually manifested as:

which when purchased I immediately started to question.   Yet basket and no bread means:

and

and finally a bit of bread to eat:

The bread was loosely based on Pan de Horiadaki, but I wasn't much in the mood for following directions after a long trip home.  So let's call it Pan Tipo de Horiadaki or Sorta Horiadaki.  Anyhow, it was nice to have bread in the house again.  And the basket isn't too messed up.

And incidentally - in neither of the two stores where I bought the baskets did the sales people know what they were - i.e., who made them, where they came from, etc.   In the second store they said their Indian crafts vendor showed up in the middle of the night and placed his merchandise in the store and only barked at them if they asked him any questions.   So, does anyone out there have any idea what type of baskets these are?   First bought in Estes Park, CO, second in Boulder. 

I'll close with a little Rocky Mountain splendor:

Comments

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Varda,

Had you wanted some bread I would have gladly given you a loaf as I live right at the foot of the Rockies and very close to Boulder....

No clue on the baskets but they are nice ones.  I could have shown you some wonderful African ones I have and where to get them - not suitable for bread though.  I use them for knitting projects, groceries and library books.

Nice loaf of bread by the way :-)

Take Care,

Janet

 

varda's picture
varda

Perhaps I drove by your house.   Mine are definitely American Indian baskets but I wish I knew more than that.   I think the first one is headed for a life of fruit.   I have real brotforms but variation is .... Thanks for your comments.  -Varda

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Varda,
So nice to see your post and hope you had a great vacation.
(thanks for the sharing the photo of the Rockies - beautiful! - and I wonder what the temperature of the water is, in that pristine little lake!)
I love the pattern your basket embossed on the bread (the bread looks really nice - nothing like home-baked,
after being away on holiday?).
:^) from breadsong

 

varda's picture
varda

we were in the 11000s where I took the picture looking down at a lake only in the 10000s,  so yes, I'm guessing it was a bit cold.  Now if I had a properly fermented dough and rice flour (?) dusting perhaps I could really make that pattern come out.   Thanks so much for your comments.  -Varda

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

your photos of the lovely baskets, bread and rocky mountain's.  I had a little chuckle when you commented about [the only homage to bread I inflicted on my family]  : ) Happy baking!  

Sylvia

varda's picture
varda

about being "yes deared" to death.    That can be very painful.   Thanks for your comments.  =Varda

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nice basket, Varda!

Your levain seems to suffer an illness...  the crumb indicates that your yeasts are overrun by LABs.

What a nice landscape.. Nice trip!

varda's picture
varda

Khalid, You are right.   I fed my tired neglected starter overnight to revive it, but it really  needs a few more days of TLC to get back into shape.   There were sticks all over my yard from the hurricane just waiting to be fed into my oven and no bread in the house, so I couldn't wait.   Perhaps my next try will be a Pan de Horiadaki that will live up to its name.   Thanks for your comments.  -Varda

lumos's picture
lumos

Welcome back, Varda.  Missed you!

What a beautiful picture of Rocky Mountains. Hope you and your family had a wonderful and restful time there.  Your  bread-fingers must've been relieved to be allowed to touch dough after 2 wks of withdrawal! :p Nice sheen on the crumb.

Both baskets are really lovely.  Actually, the way second one  looks quite similar to the one I use as a fruit basket in the dining room.

Mine has quite thick, sturdy structure with  double-layered weavings (right terminology???); one for inside and the other for outside.

I bought this not from a barking Indian :p  but from an interior accessesary shop in London some years ago. I think the label said it was made in a South Eastern Asian country......Can't remember which.....maybe Vietnam?  could be Cambodia? ....it was one of the countries in Indochina Peninsula for sure, though. 

lumos

 

 

varda's picture
varda

that the baskets are so similar.   Mine is made in the United States by perhaps Sioux Indians?   The first one is more unusual and intricate and I really wish I knew what it was.   Too bad there is not a visual search function on google yet.   We had a nice vacation.   It was nice not to bake for awhile and now nice to get back to it.    Lovely bagels by the way, on the front page no less!  -Varda

lumos's picture
lumos

Ahhh, so the 'Indian' was as in American Indian, then, not an Indian from India, as I was thinking. :p Even so,  the similarity is interesting, indeed.(btw, hope you don't think I have such a psychedelic coloured table cloth.  As I said in my blog while ago, the new glass roof on our conservatory, which is next to our dining room, has blue tint!)

Thanks for the front page photo thingy. It was totally, utterly unexpected, as you can imagine. Floyd was very kind.

lumos

varda's picture
varda

vs Indian.   When all the ethnic group names changed in the United States 20 years ago or so, textbooks and so forth started calling American Indians Native Americans.    I read an interview a few years ago with a guy who said that he and many others preferred first to be called by Tribe name, second Indians, and really detested the label of Native American.   With these baskets of course I don't know the tribe name, only guessing on the Sioux, and no idea about the other - so Indian it is.  Which is of course confusing because of the other Indians.   BTW cool psychedelic table cloth!  -Varda

lumos's picture
lumos

Pity Columbus forgot to  take a GPS in proper working order with him to tell him where he actually landed.  Interesting they prerered to be called 'Indians' rather than 'Native Americans.'  God bless Amerigo Vespucci......

And we're just like Pavlov's dog, having been conditioned to imagine a certain thing;  when you guys in US hear/read 'Indian' you think of them, while someone like me in UK, where the largest proportion of immigrants are of the subcontinent origin, I hear/read the same word and think of them, instead.   To complicate the matter more, people in Britain usually call Indians (from India)  'Asians.'

Did the psychedelic table cloth make you feel old? :p   TBH I was quite shocked when I saw the pic for the first time because the cloth in question is actually ivory white without any hint of blue (except for green for the leaves).  It's amazing how naked eyes can be deceiving. (or in complete denial....)

lumos

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

doesn't just have a little hidden Import TeePee with Peggy in the background ripping off "Made in Vietnam" labels ?   ;)

 

varda's picture
varda

You had to say that didn't you.  I only spent $20 on it so I'm just going to enjoy it no matter where it came from.   So there! :) -Varda

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

beautiful.  I am nuts about baskets, too.   :)

wally's picture
wally

The baskets are lovely, and it's great that you've put one to good bread use.   I'm sure your starter is a little cranky after two weeks - kind of like a pet you've left behind.  Happy you're back but a little standoffish.  A couple days  of good feedings and it should be in good form again.

Larry

varda's picture
varda

I was surprised it was in such bad shape since it was in the back of the refrigerator where it usually rests pretty happily, but I think there must have been a power failure during the hurricane as well for who knows how long.   It was nice to be out of the state when it hit.   I'm taking care of it now and hopefully it will forgive me the neglect and go back to raising breads properly before long.   Thanks for your comments.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Lovely photo from your venture into the hills Varda!

Nice crumb on the bread, but like Larry and Khalid, I hope you manage to get your levain back to full working order

Best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

is recuperating on the counter.   I hope it survives this bad treatment.   Thanks so much for your comments and good wishes.  -Varda

Syd's picture
Syd

Welcome back from your vacation, Varda.  I think you should go ahead and 'pollute' the top basket with flour because it is going to make an interesting pattern on your finished boule.  You could always line it with linen but that wouldn't prevent that spiral weave pattern from showing through.  Nice bread and lovely pictures of the Rockies.  Have you fired up your WFO, yet or did you do that one in the kitchen?

All the best,

Syd

varda's picture
varda

go ahead and 'pollute' the top basket with flour because it is going to make an interesting pattern on your finished boule

I'll just have to wait until familiarity breeds contempt. 

I did bake in my oven, but I was so spaced out after traveling that I didn't fire enough and had a long slow bake and so a pale crust.  Fortunately, I had loaded logs into the chamber of the oven before we left, and covered the oven with a weighted tarp, so everything was perfectly dry and ready to go despite the high winds and rain from Hurricane Irene.  

It's so nice to hear from you.

-Varda