The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Grinding Wheat and Other Grains

CHEF - Montana's picture
CHEF - Montana

Grinding Wheat and Other Grains

I am very pleased to find this web page and have enjoyed reading all the blogs that have been posted.  Most of them seem to have one thing in common and that is concern about their grain mill and flour over heating.  I have ground grain for many years and have learned that moisture in the grain can be the most common problem.  I had problems with some wheat that I had purchased from a local farmer. I noticed that when ever I tried to grind it the grain mill became hot easily and the flour was moist. The grain mill would become glazed and stop. My Father noticed this and since he had raised wheat and other grains all his life he reminded me that the problem was that there was too high of a moisture content in the grain.  I realized that he was right and I put some of the wheat in a shallow pan and put it in the oven on warm for about an hour and then I stired it and let it stay in the warm oven a little longer. I then turned the oven off and let it set until it had cooled down.  I then put it in an air tight metal container. I was pleasantly surprised when I went to grind it the next time as it went through easily and I was able to grind what I needed plus more and the grain mill was warm but not hot.  If you notice that your flour sticks together more that normal when you are using your grain mill, this could be your problem. It might take a little time to dry your grains but it will be worth it to have your grinding process go faster.

I have a website that features kitchen and cooking supplies.  My goal is to bring a "Kitchen Supply Store" to those who live in rural areas where shopping is limited and to those who like to shop from home.  If you like to look at fun and useful items, you might enjoy browsing around on the pages and the blog.  For those of you who like to bake, you will find grain mills, mixers, speciality pans and many more useful items. 

Thanks for looking- THE CHEF IN YOU        http://thechefinyou.com/

 

 

Comments

loydb's picture
loydb

.... or you can get a Retsel and stone-grind it, in which case it stays cool.

 

 

CHEF - Montana's picture
CHEF - Montana

Thank you for the information on the Retsel.  I did some research on them and they look like a great grain mill. The mill that I was using was a stone mill and the stones would get hot and glaze up. Do you know if the Retsel works better as you said that it stays cool. 

Thanks,

Diane

THE CHEF IN YOU

loydb's picture
loydb

I've never had a problem with glazing. I use the metal 'stones' to grind corn because of the moisture, and the regular stones for rye and wheat. The motor housing on the Retsel gets hot to the touch, but the stones never get beyond warm (at least in the 2#-3# max I put through at one time), and the flour itself stays cool.

Know that, if you buy a Retsel, be prepared to order it and wait. And wait. And perhaps get lied to. And wait some more. And not have phone calls returned. And then there's the waiting. Their powdercoating policy is insane, I suggest just taking 'first available' as the color.

Fortunately, they aren't thieves, and will eventually send you a fantastic mill. They're just 'customer-service challenged.'