The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help with Sandwich bread

caisys's picture
caisys

Help with Sandwich bread

Hi,

I recently purchased a small restaurant in Bucharest Romania. I am from Egypt and would like to serve some hot sandwiches we have in my home country. I cannot find suitable bread here in Romania. Bread here usually has a leathery crust and is quite dense or is called baguette and has a crust that is too crunchy. I want to make fluffy soft loaves around 10 inches long and 2 inches white whose crust do not make any resistance when biting. This is very common in Egypt and we are not that famous for baking.

I found two bakeries near my shop who said they would make special recipes for me. I am attaching two pictures of the type pf sandwiches I wish to serve. Can you direct me to which recipes I should try to produce?

Thanks

Ahmed

cranbo's picture
cranbo

If soft, non-resistant crust is what you're looking for, I'm thinking "dinner roll", "hamburger bun" or "hotdog bun". There are plenty of those recipes here, just use the search. Another option is bread like the fastfood chain Subway in the US produces...that might fit the bill. 

You probably want an enriched yeast bread (with some combination of milk, oil/fat and egg, and probably a bit of sugar), moderate hydration (somewhere between 50-60% of flour weight), intensively kneaded (for even crumb), and baked at moderate temperatures (350-375F) with little to no steam.

That will give you nice, fluffy loaves. 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

The first bread I think of when I see the pictures is Peter Reinhart's Vienna bread in his book, The Bread Baker's Apprentice. At least the way my efforts at it turn out. I don't have the exact recipe(never did), just and online "adaptation" which may or may not been the exact recipe.

caisys's picture
caisys

Thank you very much for the quick response.

Another two questions:

1) Any specific improvers should be used? I can get bread flour but there are also many suppliers for dough conditioners.

3) Several recipes call for overnight fermentation at room temperature. I assume bakers have fermentation chambers, would that help? my prblem is that I do not think I can ask them for a recipe that would require that long time. It has to be a straight forward operation so they can produce my bread economically.

Thanks

Ahmed

cranbo's picture
cranbo

If you want more "chew" for your crumb, you might want to add vital wheat gluten.

Improvers may or may not be necessary. They're used to improve production & quality aspects, like rising time & volumes, dough texture, adjusting for issues with water pH, etc. For your reference Lallemand has a nice PDF file about dough conditioners/improvers

I'd leave it up to your selected bakery to determine what's necessary for this, based on the kind of bread you wish to produce.

I'd also leave it up to the baker to determine what fermentation cycle to use to produce the bread with the qualities you want. It's likely that they will proof in cabinets at controlled temperature to ensure a consistent product.  

 

homedepot's picture
homedepot

Hey there, came across your thread because I was also looking to make subway style sandwiches. I came across this one which was posted 2 days ago, hope this helps you and anyone else.

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/21448/real-italian-hoagie-rolls#comments

 

Thanks

 

P.S. I think this is the best one yet on this site :)

caisys's picture
caisys

Thank you very much ... this looks delicious and reminds me of the traditional Fino bread we have in Egypt. Unfortunately though ... I failed at every aspect of my project that I had to sell the business :( I might try this just for fun if I had the chance.

Thanks

Ahmed