The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Molasses

Azazello's picture
Azazello

Molasses

Hey there

I want to make Peter Reinhart's Anadama bread.

I'm in the UK and wondered if anyone knows what the equivalent of Golden Molasses would be - I'm thinking of Golden Syrup would be a close analogue. Can anyone confirm please?

Thanks in advance

 

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

The golden syrup he mentions in the sidenote is Brer Rabbit Light Flavor Syrup. I think he called it "golden" because the bottle's label is gold:

It's molasses, just light molasses. I think it's from the first boiling. Full molasses comes from the second boiling. Blackstrap, which is almost inedible, from the third and final, but don't quote me on that.

If the golden syrup you're thinking of is like treacle or Lyle's Golden Syrup, they are not interchangeable. You need molasses for anadama.



Azazello's picture
Azazello

OK - thanks for the reply, much appreciated; that's cleared that up! I was thinking of golden syrup (your bottom picture) might be a rough equivalent.

First boiling would have the most sugar.

I'll get googling to see if I can find any stockists here.

 

plevee's picture
plevee

Which I've seen on Amazon, but the molasses should be there too.

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

thomaschacon75 wrote:
Blackstrap, which is almost inedible
I wouldn't use anything but for dark, heavy ryes. Then there's warmed cornbread with butter and blackstrap poured over it; pure heavenly bliss. Aah.

cheers,

gary

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

...when asphalt runs low. ;)

I've had some wonderful blackstrap molasses (at least that's what it was labeled as), but not sure it's the same thing that comes out of the sugarmills in southern Louisiana called "blackstrap". Mein gott, that stuff is noxious!

(They say pig farms are the worst smelling things on earth, but sugarmills have to be a close second.)

(Might be a way to put diabetics off sugar forever! I do believe I have a business plan here! Mardi Gras Sugar Aversion Therapy Tours.)

(Sorry, too much coffee. I'll stop now.)

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

I've spent lots of time researching Anadama bread recipes on the internet and ran across a page that purported to have the original recipe from the Anadama Bread Commercial Bakery in Rockport, MA. The quantities appear to be adequate for two small loaves. 

1/2 cup cornmeal -- coarse type
2 tablespoons butter
2 cups boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup blackstrap molasses -- unsulphured blackstrap molasses
1 pkg. active dry yeast
5 cups unbleached flour

This partcular recipe uses blackstrap. I used an unsulphured molasses in my Anadama recipe and it worked out just fine. Should you find yourself with too much time on your hands, do an internet search for Anadama recipes. You'll find that they're like opinions, everybody has got one.

 



Azazello's picture
Azazello

I had a look at Brer Rabbiot's product line and it seems they extract sugar from their molasses and replace it with HFCS,

I have some Lyle's treacle in the cupboard but would want a lighter taste for the bread.

There's a site over here that stocks Grandma's Original Molasses and I'll use that I think,

Thanks people, I appreciate the guidance.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Hi Azazello,

The Grandma's brand of molasses is one that I use frequently in the States for anadama bread and other foods that call for molasses.  It will work well for you.

Paul

Azazello's picture
Azazello

Thanks Paul

I'm looking forward to making this bread!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Confused?

Maybe you are confusing the syrup(pictured above) for molasses? If so, that is not the case. They are not the same.

In the US, the only ingredient in Brer Rabbit molasses is, molasses. Comes in 3 varieties: blackstrap, full flavor, and mild. Can only assume he means one of these, most likely the mild. But they are all, just molasses.

Azazello's picture
Azazello

Yes, my mistake.

Sorry, Brer Rabbit.

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

Looks like that's my mistake, actually.

I couldn't find anything Brer Rabbit that was "Golden", so made a guess that he meant the Brer Rabbit Light Falvoured Syrup *because it has a gold label*. Don't know if that's wrong, yet, but if so, then we're back to square one.

What does Reinhart mean when he says "Brer Rabbit Golden Molasses"? Has the product been discontinued? If so, what was it? 

This isn't Golden Molasses... 

Nor is this...

Nor is this...

 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Certainly not the "syrup".

The recipe calls for "molasses". He just offers that most seemed to prefer a "lighter" molasses for this recipe.

Azazello's picture
Azazello

In my edition he does state that

"People who tested this formula preferred Brer Rabbbit Golden Molasses for its lightness."

Reinhart definitely refers to a type of molasses that Brer Rabbit doesn't make as being the one that people prefer! Bad editing, I guess.

I'll stick with Grandma's Original as I can't get hold of Brer Rabbi anyway.

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

I'm rather curious as to what it is/was now.

The all-knowing Google has reference to it, but the queries are the same as yours, essentially, "What is this stuff? I've never seen it."

The recipe recommends Brer Rabbit Golden Molasses which I have never seen before. I looked online with no luck and could only find a reference that referred to the Mild Flavor as "Gold Label". http://www.cooksillustrated.com/ibb/posts.aspx?memberID=31&boardID=1&postRepeater1-p=21

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

I also use Grandmother's molasses when I make Anadama bread.

 

Here's a post I did awhile back when I was trying to do the Baker's Apprentice Challenge a couple of years ago.

http://theyeasticoulddo.net/2009/05/21/anadama-bread/

 

I made all sorts of substitutions, and it was still awesome :) My husband's co-workers scarfed it up.

Azazello's picture
Azazello

That's a great guide; thanks for the link.

All it lacks is a crumb shot!

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Ah, yes, a crumb shot :) I haven't made this bread in a rather long time, but if I remember correctly it was a fairly dense/close crumb.

EvaB's picture
EvaB

you were giving me the giggles! It might work, but I don't think so, since I used to drive by the worst smelling sheep farm in the country, and believe me it was worse than pigs any day. And don't get me started on beef feedlots, those stink as well. Would much rather sit in a airport inhaling the jet fumes, they just smell like super duty coal oil lamps to me!