The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New to bakfing Bread Machine Dough in Oven...please advise!

Heidi257@aol.com's picture
Heidi257@aol.com

New to bakfing Bread Machine Dough in Oven...please advise!

Hi, there!

I am new to breadmaking and really like the idea of using the breadmaker dough and baking in the oven. I especially like 100% whole grain bread. I think I finally found a recipe I love, but had a question about how much I should expect it to rise. I just increased the gluten to 3 Tablespoons (was 4 teaspoons) as I heard that it should be 1 TBSP per cup. Is this right? The dough rises, but does not rise past the top of the loaf pan? Just wanted to make sure this is what I should expect?

 

Also, I am interested in cutting a more portion controlled slice of bread that resembles more of a store-bought slice? I tried a 12 inch pan, but it was only 3 inches wide so they are just a tad too small (especially when it doesn't rise much). For a 1 1/2 lb. loaf, can anyone suggest a better size pan to get at least 16 slices out of it...would a 11 x 4 work?

 

Thanks so much!

Heidi

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== The dough rises, but does not rise past the top of the loaf pan? Just wanted to make sure this is what I should expect? ===

That is going to depend a bit on your machine and weather it has a shallow or deep bucket.  But if you are using the dough cycle, which is generally around 60-90 minutes on most machines, the dough won't rise all that high.  Anywhere from a 50% to 100% (doubling) increase in volume. 

As long as it rises somewhat from the ball that was there after the knead cycle it will be fine.  Take it out, give it a stretch-and-fold, put it in a covered container for a 2nd rise cycle, then shape the final loaf and let it proof (final rise) before baking.  It is easier to do than to write about actually!

sPh

 

Chuck's picture
Chuck

...increased the gluten to 3 Tablespoons (was 4 teaspoons) as I heard that it should be 1 TBSP per cup. Is this right?

I don't think there's any "right" answer for the amount of VitalWheatGluten; it depends on the style of bread and on the recipe.

It also depends greatly on the kind of flour you're using. Adding even more VitalWheatGluten to a high-gluten bread flour that already has 12.7% gluten content is likely to turn out overly "chewy" (maybe even "rubbery") bread. On the other hand mixing VitalWheatGluten into a cake flour with only 8% gluten content might make a good substitute for your normal bread flour if you've run out and can't go to the store at the moment. 

In my experience, most manual bread recipes -and even many bread machine recipes- don't use VitalWheatGluten at all. There have been instances here on TFL where completely omitting VitalWheatGluten from a recipe led to better bread.

Bread machine recipes tend to use ingredient tricks (very high amounts of yeast, VitalWheatGluten, etc.) to compensate for not being able to knead or shape as well as you could do by hand. For starting with a bread machine's "dough cycle" and finishing by hand, it may be appropriate to base ingredients on manual recipes rather than bread machine recipes (stick to high-hydration recipes though, otherwise you might burn out your bread machine's motor). For using the recipe you're using now, my suggestion is to first get it working and then reduce the amount of yeast and of VitalWheatGluten little by little.

 

can anyone suggest a better size pan

Bread baking loaf pans are ubiquitous and cheap. They're the right width and the right length and only as high as the straight part (not the rounded top) of a finished loaf. Most are sheet metal -often non-stick; a few are cast-iron; glass/pyrex is another option. I'd suggest buying the real thing rather than trying to kludge some substitute.