The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sam's club wheat hoagie

  • Pin It
swiftset's picture
swiftset

Sam's club wheat hoagie

Hi guys, this is my first post here. I'm a huge fan of the Sam's Club wheat hoagies. I scarf them down when I visit my parents, but where I am I can't get to them. Is there a taste-alike recipe? I've looked at several hoagie recipes here, and in Reinhart's book, but nothing tastes as good as those Sam's Club hoagies.

cranbo's picture
cranbo

just guessing here, but they've probably are made with some dough conditioners, and are baked in special ovens. Doing a "bake-alike" recipe is always tough, you can probably get close but won't ever be exactly the same. 

I've never tried them, but maybe start with finding the ingredient list, then work back from there. 

swiftset's picture
swiftset

yeah, the tenderness and moistness is unusual for a whole wheat bread, so I imagine they use something like lecithin and maybe some additional gluten. The color is darker than usual wheat, but I'm not sure why that is or if it's material to the taste. I did an internet search, but I don't come up with the ingredients. If no one here has any ideas, I'll end up experimenting myself. Or I'll find someway to locate someone who works in the bakery at a Sam's Club :)

cranbo's picture
cranbo

As for the darker color, it could be molasses, cocoa powder, or pureed raisins. The molasses and the raisins add a certain sweetness. You might want to check out this Wheat Honey Oat recipe, would probably be a good start.

I found a picture of a roll on the product page:

http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shop/product.jsp?productId=102218

It looks a lot like Subway wheat sandwich bread. Speaking of which, there are some videos showing Subway's baking process (a series of 4), which give you an idea of how their bread (and likely Sam's Club wheat hoagies) are baked.

There's also a Subway PDF file which describes their baking process.

What I gathered from the videos and PDF file:
  1. Their bread is frozen, and defrosted in a fridge for 8-12 hours, then floor proofing until internal temp is 45-55F. 
  2. Then seasonings are applied to the outside.
  3. The dough is then placed in the proofer @ 105F for 50-60 min at moderate humidity (they use setting 3-5). Once bread reaches 75% of size (they have a small plastic half-circle template determine right proofing height based on the silicone forms they use), it is ready to bake. 
  4. Baking: 350F  for 10-20 minutes, depending on the oven. 
  5. Cooling: Cool in a cooling cabinet for 30 min, with bread remaining on sheet pans and in the silicone forms. 
  6. Remove from forms and place in storage cabinet. 

 

 

swiftset's picture
swiftset

Wow that's really helpful. I'll take a look at the Subway vids. The pureed raisins sound intriguing. I considered molasses, but I'm not really a fan of the taste.