The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

super peel

freerk's picture
freerk

super peel

very fast update! I should have checked first; there are numerous threads on the subject already. wish I knew how to kill this one now, but alas, I don't!

Freerk

Hey TFL-ers

Looking for a reasonably priced couche (or a way to make myself one) I ran into this "superpeel".

When You check out the video, you'll see why they call it "super".

It goes at a hefty 60€ or so, but by Jove, it looks handy!

Does any of you have any experience with this "superpeel"?

Freerk

 

Candango's picture
Candango

Freerk, Why not check out www.superpeel.com, the home site for the super peel.  The list price is usd 48, including shipping (probably only within the us).  They also offer options, such as different woods and extra belts.  At any rate, it would seem a better price than the 60 Euros mentioned on the German site.  Cheers.  Bob

freerk's picture
freerk

Great Bob!

Thanks, I've sent them a message! They ask international customers to contact them directly, so that's what I did. Great lead! I hope they're not going to refer me to the German site :-| let's see. The price is a lot more interesting, even with shipping!

Thanks again

Freerk

Update: just ordered here for 45€, and it's a local source! great! http://www.dekeukenvanmariette.nl/?menu=category&categoryID=394976

codruta's picture
codruta

I found a good price here, at least for England residents. http://bakerybits.co.uk/The-Super-Peel-P1057321.aspx

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

I found it at this link as well: http://www.breadtopia.com/store/pizza-peels.html and they sell a spare cloth for $6.50.

It looks lika a great tool.

Brad

freerk's picture
freerk

Good deal when you are in the U.S. !

Chuck's picture
Chuck

If you're having problems getting your dough into your oven (or are just starting out, and shudder just thinking about "sliding" dough off a peel), the superpeel is probably a great investment.

But if you can already get your dough into your oven with no problem (probably via a non-super peel, maybe augmented with parchment paper), IMHO the superpeel isn't going to add much (at least not at the small quantities baked in a home oven).

lumos's picture
lumos

Gosh, Freerk, you're really on your spending spree, aren't you?  If you're too loaded and don't know how to spend it, you can just tell me anytime. I'll be a great help! ;)

I have looked into it sometime ago when I first learned that such a splendid thing existed in the world.  But in the end, I decided I might not need it. Unless I bake it in a covered pot (=my trusted Pyrex casserole with lid), I always place my dough on a sheet of baking perchment (I started using re-usuable ones like this lately, to be more 'environmentally friendly) and slide it onto the baking stone, using a large flat baking tray like this (or an upturned baking tray will do, if you don't have a flat one) .  The main reason I decided not to buy was a storage issue because every space in my kitchen is choc-full of stuff (I run a small cookery class at home) and had absolutely no spare room left for such a big tool, but in the end, the method above worked perfectly and never looked back. And besides, if you use a perchament paper to transfer the dough, there's no need to worry about staining your precious tombstone baking stone, either.  ;)

I know this isn't a sort of post you're looking for, but thought I'd better save my salt for rubbing into you. The stock is beginning to run low.....:p

lumos

ETA: However, if you're really desperate to buy the superpeel, BakeryBits have an agency(?) in UK, where I bought some of my stuff from in the past. They do overseas delivery and  probably P&P would be cheaper than having it sent from a supplier in US. 

ETA2: I'd missed your second post....this was too late, wasn't it.....I'll go and restock my salt then.....Good luck with your new toy. Awaits for your excited report! ;)

codruta's picture
codruta

lumos, I must say you have a great sense of humor. :)

lumos's picture
lumos

::Desperately hopes you're not just being sarcastic...::  :p

codruta's picture
codruta

no sarcasm here. I really meant what I said. I love reading your comments, you're tonic and spirited (in romanian this sounds good) :)

codruta

lumos's picture
lumos

Thanks. I like tonic...especially when it's combined with spirit, like gin. :p

freerk's picture
freerk

Some one has to keep the economy going I guess!

But I AM on sort of a baking-shopping spree. I promised myself I could burn part of this year's tax return on baking stuff!

I usually bake on parchment as well, and have no severe problems getting my bread into the oven, but I do like shaping on my workspace, and it's for transferring to the couche (that I'm also getting, unless I find a good way to fabricate one myself) that I might use it most. That, and being able to get my small buns with seeds into the oven without touching them too much. And although I read reports that the "super peel" has some trouble with the higher hydration doughs, I hope it will work nicely on those as well! Sometimes I manage to shape a tight high hydration dough, only to wreck it in transferring it to the couche.

Freerk

 

lumos's picture
lumos

Right, so you are going to be the saviour of the world in this economic climate, then?   Good on you! Keep on working. We all need your mercy.  Let me know what you're going to buy next. I'll put all my money to buy the shares of the manufacturer!

The couche I'm using (The real thing. Not improvised versions!) is from Japan. It's made of thick canvas with very tight weaving, so dough won't stick and also it quite stiff it supports shaped dough very well even it's very wet and soft. Also, because it's quite heavy material, you can even work the dough on it, like cutting/pre-shaping/shaping, if you need to, making cleaning your worktop afterwards much easier.  I used to improvise with thick, linen tea towel or small table cloth, but nothing can beat the real McCoy!  Not sure what sort of couche you can get where you are, but all the couche which is readily available in UK seem to be made of thinner and softer material.  So this one is one of very few things I wouldn't improvise with anything else.

To transfer small and delicate doughs, like buns, to the couche or a baking parchment,  I just use two dough scrapers  and scoop it up from both sides one by one. Or if it's a larger one, dough flippers (improvised= A removable bottom of mylong,  rectangular pie case) which I use to transfer shaped baguette......Wanna more salt?

lumos

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

but i put parchment paper on my $9 pizza peel and do the final proofing right on the peel, inverting an aluminum pan over it to keep the dough from drying out. The handle sticks way out off the counter, but it works.

Anna

 

lumos's picture
lumos

It's ok, Anna. He's on the misson for saving the world. :p

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

:)

lumos's picture
lumos

Amen.

freerk's picture
freerk

wonderful ending to this thread! let's move on!

lumos's picture
lumos

What is your next destiny, our Lord? Show us the way..........before you put your money on. :p

sam's picture
sam

Hey freerk,

Whether you fabricate one yourself, or buy one ...   I use one I got from superpeel.com, very happy with it.   Works like a charm.

 

 

Debbe1's picture
Debbe1

I have one and I LOVE it. I have had it for about 2 1/2 years. I never owned any kind of peel and I thought if I was going to buy one why not have one that makes my life easier.

davidg618's picture
davidg618

It's differing opinions that make horse races.

I own a superpeel. I bought it shortly after I started baking at the general TFL level, about three years ago. It's been resting in the pantry, untouched, for more than two years. Here's my take on the superpeel.

I found it heavy, and awkward to use especially when loaded with a 1.5 lb. loaf (I bake two 1.5 lb. sourdough loaves weekly), and I can only use one hand to support the peel, by a handle at the end of a moment-arm approximately 18" from the center-of-gravity of a loaded loaf. It's especially adventurous holding a 3 lb. miche.

The cloth doesn't always move smoothly, nor squarely when loading

It only put loaves into the oven. You still need a different peel or oven mitts to remove loaves.

It's too narrow to load two 1.5 lb. loaves side-by-side. Side-by-side is the only way I can bake two loaves in my 20" wide, 14.5" deep home oven. My baking stone is cut to these dimensions (These are the useable width and depth; the oven's physical dimensions are 22" x 16", a fairly standard width and depth for a 30" home oven.)

It's two wide (14")  to load two 1.5 loaves serially. No matter how I twisted the super peel, and loaded onto the stone pulled fully out of the oven, invariably more than half the time I'd damage the first-loaded loaf with the side of the peel.

It's useless for loading baguettes, except very short ones.

It's expensive.

For the past couple of years, my "go-to" peel is a board I cut from 1/4" birch plywood scrap, 20" long x 8" wide, dusted with rice flour. I load  three 20" baguettes, serially, holding the board by its wide side, or two 1.5 lb. boules or batards, serially, holding the board by its narrow side. I've yet to damage any loaf loading. To remove the loaves, I used a pizza peel I've owned for more than twenty years, until last Christmas when my wife bought me a pair of Ov Gloves. Now I handle the baking loaves when I need to (taking temperture, rearranging, and removal) wearing the gloves.

It's light, it works, and the price was right.

I don't recommend the superpeel to friends and family.

David G

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Following David G I have to say I also use a simple rice-floured board and take the loaves out using high-heat resistant (in my case Kevlar), oven gloves.

I found peeling very difficult at first and was completely unused to being so close to a very hot oven. Over the last year I've come to the conclusion that the secret of good, quick peeling is in the wrist action as much if not more so than in the peel material. 

Whereas when I first started loading loaves I used to stand in front of the oven in my big gloves, trembling, pluck up my courage and then slowly fumble the peel, I can now flick the loaves in without even thinking about it :-) 

I have, however, never got on with the parchment transfer. The first time I tried a board to oven transfer with parchment, I was so relieved and happy to have got the thing done that I didn't notice until the loaf had taken half as long as normal to cook that I had peeled the board n all LOL...I also find with the parchment transfer that my hands are near the hot oven shelf, whereas I can wrist peel from a safe distance now and still get the loaves to land upright. If I'm having an off moment and the odd sticky one lands awry I just swiftly stick it to it from a distance with a wok iron. 

So my conclusion is that good peeling can be achieved with a range of boards. I hope that you find something that's right for you. 

Best wishes, Daisy_A

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

Hi Daisy_A

Good to hear from you again!  Are you recovered from your trip to the hospital and able to bake again?

I cannot use a superpeel because they are too wide for my Aga - the ovens are deep but not as wide as normal electric and gas ovens so I use an Aga pizza peel or a full sized Aga cold shelf.

Best Wishes

Ruralidle