The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Seam won't stick

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jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

Seam won't stick

I think this may be related to the heat here..but my seams won't stay stuck!

I shape and place seam side up in banneton and come back in an hour to find gaping holes where the seams opened.  I've cut down on water a tad due to the heat/humidity here and I tried leaving the shaped boule for a bit before placing in the banneton, and I have tried shaping using no flour at all.  I haven't tried placing seam side down in banneton yet - will do that next...

jcking's picture
jcking

After switching to a large wooden cutting board I've had better results keeping the seam closed. Try to get a nice drag as you pull the dough around the board. You may also want to put the tad of water back. The heat may cause your dough to proof faster; keep an eye on it.

Fornituri te salutant!
(Those who are about to bake salute you!)

Jim

juliette's picture
juliette

Hi Jackie, Usually the seams not sticking means your dough is too dry or you are using too much flour during the shaping. Since you said you have had bad results using no flour in the shaping then I agree with Jim that you should add back the water you have taken out, and if that does not work then use a little more (add in very small increments until you get it right). Never place the dough in the banneton seam side down because when you flip it out to bake your seam will be on top, and it defeats the whole purpose of the lovely pattern. Sometimes my seams open a bit during the first 10 minutes after placing the dough in the banneton as it adjusts to the basket. Just go back and pinch it closed where it has opened up, not just on the surface, but pinch it in about a half an inch on both sides. If heat and humidity are the problem then I also suggest retarding your dough. You don't say what kind of dough that you are using. I only make sourdough, and summer in Arizona can be challenging. I make the dough using refrigerated water, and then retard it in the fridge for 24 hours. Then I take it out, shape it cold, put it in the banneton, put the whole thing inside a closed plastic bag in the fridge for another 24 hours, then take it out and let it sit at room temp for at least an hour. Uncover it for 10 to 15 minutes, flip it gently on to the baking surface, slash and score, and bake. The dough does not have to be at room temp to bake. I get good results. Good luck!

juliette's picture
juliette

My round banneton is the most problematic...I almost always have to go back and pinch it closed where it has popped open. The longer retangular don't do it as often. What shape of banneton are you using?

jackie9999's picture
jackie9999

Thanks for the suggestions - it is sourdough (round banneton) that is giving me the problems. It's a recipe I've been using for over a year and usually gives me no trouble. I have been pinching the seams closed before I flip over onto the stone - but even then they are trying to open up again. I tried the cold retard overnight and still got the gaping open. I'm sure it's heat/humidity related since they are proofing too fast and I don't have a 'cool' place to make the bread...so I'll just have to perserve and hope the weather cools off soon.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

If you watch some of the videos the bakers really pound the seam! Don't be too gentle but really whale on just the edge-not the whole loaf!.