The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Working with Fresh Ground Grain

syllymom's picture
syllymom

Working with Fresh Ground Grain

I recently bought a grain mill and have tried to bake with fresh ground grain, but I'm baking up bricks instead.  So what's secret to freshly ground grain?

Sylviambt's picture
Sylviambt

Syllymom,

I think that you'll find at least a couple of threads on this topic with lots of great advise from bakers with lots of experience.  If you search 'nutrimill' I think you find one of them.

Sylvia

lisak's picture
lisak

I don't have much experience (yet!) with making artisan breads from 100% ww flour but I do have good luck with my ww bread made in a loaf pan. This recipe is the one I have had the best results with.....it is quick (only one rise time) and easy and has a good flavor. :) There are other good recipes and tips for using fresh flour on this site. I have a Nutrimill and am very happy with it.

 http://tinyurl.com/ynsdul

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

Syllymom,

The first thing I'd look at is the grain you're using. When you're making 100% whole wheat bread, you want the strongest flour you can find, and that means hard spring wheat. The hard winter wheat will work, but not as well as hard spring, which has a much higher protein content.

I also laid out some whole wheat tips here at this link that might help.

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

I've just bought my twice - a - year sack of wheat from an organic farm. £8 for 25 kilos - it makes sourdough bread so affordable! I've ground about a pound in my wheatmill and mixed up my dough - should be a lovely loaf there by tomorrow lunch time of 50% wholemeal and 50% white organic bread flour. This bake will be in a heated Le Creuset again - I love the effect of the rise when it is slashed and springs up so nicely. It is to take to my sister - I HOPE it works as it usually does and not stick to the pot like a thread here recently!
Andrew

arydberg's picture
arydberg

I use a wheat grinder and a bread machine.    The only way things work outs to add 1 tablespoon of gluten from bob's red mill for each cup of flour.    Apparently  if the flour is not aged the gluten is low.