The Fresh Loaf

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White sourdough with a little wholemeal mash

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nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

White sourdough with a little wholemeal mash

Recently Andy sent me a link to a pdf that discussed the effects of the addition of small percentages of pregelatinized flour to a loaf. The particularity was that the flour (preferrably wholemeal) is supposed to be kept at a temperature that would favor alpha-amylase activity without inhibiting beta-amylase, the usual 65°C, in order to develop sugars (to boost fermentation and increase volume) and dextrins (that should relent staling). Few weeks ago I made my first loaf with the technique of water roux that gave me a very airy and light loaf with absolutely no taste, so I decided to retry substituting the roux with the mash and see what would come out.

I only changed the percentage of gelatinized flour (almost 10%) and the hydratation of the mash (3:1, as in typical beer-making).

This is how I proceeded:

-I prepared the mash with 40 gr of wholemeal flour mixed with 120 gr of water heated to 75°C.  The final temperature of the mash was exactly 65°C. I kept the mash enveloped in a blanket of pile for the duration of the preferment (below). At the end it was  sweetish and quite liquid.
-70 gr of preferment at 75% hidratation (half durum and half soft wheat flours)

After 10 hours I dissolved the mash and the preferment in 130 gr of water, then I added 360 of soft wheat flour per pizza, let autolyze for 30 minutes, finally I added 10 gr of salt and gave 5 rounds of folds every 30 minutes using some peanut oil to help me. When it was time (the dough itself woke me up at 6 am) I baked the loaf at 180°C starting from cold oven.

 

 

 

As with the other bread the crumb came out so soft (but more airy!) that it's immaterial, even difficult to slice as the picture shows. The crust was hard, but it softened too much during the rest (how can I sort out this recurring problem?). The aroma is really good. The taste...uhm, so and so, barely worth the effort: there's some sweet tone, but  I'm definitively inclined to rejoin for good the dark side.

 

Well, not exactly a success but I HAD  to testimony it.

ananda's picture
ananda

I think the moist crumb on this looks so good, Nico...

But; welcome back to the dark side!   It's the best place to be!

All good wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

You had me totally fascinated with these methods that I know nothing about and then you say you're going back to the dark side?   But, but, it's too soon.   The flavor will come won't it?   You can use a more interesting flour for the final dough perhaps?   Anyhow, very cool post.  -Varda

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Varda, while doing this bread. The taste may come, maybe... only the practice will tell. I was thinking to try your 20% rye bread that made me fall off my chair when I saw it. It could give good results.

Thanks for your kind words!

varda's picture
varda

that moves me one step closer.   When I read Andy's posts on the subject it seems to advanced for me.   But I see you have achieved such a soft crumb that I would have had no idea how to do before.  But I'm  curious why don't you post something like this in the Blog section?  -Varda

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Varda, I have to confess that I have a very serious allergy to blogs! :)