The Fresh Loaf

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Pain aux Céréales, based on Erik Kayser's formula

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freerk's picture
freerk

Pain aux Céréales, based on Erik Kayser's formula

Hey fellow TFL-ers

Erik Kayser's formula's and breads are quickly gaining popularity in my baking ball-book. After giving his Buckwheat Paline a spin earlier, I went for the Pain aux Céréales this weekend, pointed to Don's formula here by Andy (Ananda). It was a great success from start to finish. A great dough to work with, a wonderful balance of flavours and, not unimportant, a great looker!

The seeds

The loaves

 A detail of the crust

and the crumb of course

 

Happy baking, thank you Don for the formula, and Andy for the pointer!

Freerk

P.S. You would do me a big favor endorsing my BreadLab iniative. Every "like" will get me closer to realizing a 6 episode documentary/road movie; chasing the best bread Europe has to offer. Thanks in advance!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Freerk,

The interior of that bread is so impressive.

Lovely work!

Andy

freerk's picture
freerk

thank you again for pointing out this wonderful bread!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I love the photos of the seeds, and your crumb is magnificent.

I had this bread in Paris in May, and it was delicious. Frankly, yours looks even better than the original.

David

freerk's picture
freerk

That's is the best compliment to get David! I was supposed to make a short trip to Paris two weeks ago, but the rain was horrible, so we'll save that trip for September as a stop over on the way to South America.

This formula makes a great dough! And it developed very easy and fast and was quite strong. 4 minutes of mixing and I already thought I was overdoing it. I used a 50/50 mix of wheat gold and a 85% high extraction flour.

I'm very happy with the result, and will have to make it again just before going to Paris to compare it taste wise to what Kayser sells!

Freerk

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

Those loaves are exquisite!  The shaping and slash is so very perfect.  What impresses me most; however, is the adherance of the seeds and the open, webby crumb.  Can you offer some insights?

freerk's picture
freerk

the adherence of the seeds takes care of itself. I lightly mist the dough and then spronkle the seeds on. During the bake they kind of get stuck, but you'll have to hadnle them with care every time you cut a  slice!

 

The open webby crumb is... just how it came out at this hydration. I used a mix of 50/50 Wheat GOLD and 85% high extraction flour instead of the 90% asked for in this adaptation. The dough was very nice to handle!

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

With my sourdough, I sprinkle sesame seed on top of the flour in my "brotmold" basket.  I pray for the dough skin to be moist enough to accept the seed but still release the mold when it's oven time.

I really envy your ability to know your wheat so intimately!

freerk's picture
freerk

That should work as well!

longhorn's picture
longhorn

Great Bread! Well Done! And great pictures, too!

I haven't done Kayser lately....Your post creates a strong urge to revisit that bread.

Well done!

Jay

freerk's picture
freerk

Thanks Jay!

I'm working on a second, bigger bâtard as we speak.

I had to know if I got lucky or that the second time around the dough would be just as much a joy to handle.

Only a slight difference in the development of the dough at first, but I ended up skipping the 5th stretch and fold because it just wasn't necessary any more.

The only possible two differences are in the levain, that was last fed yesterday and proved to be quite lively with a very nice fresh sour. First time around I grew a separate little levain overnight, now I just added the amount of levain straight from the left over from the wild yeast I was refreshing. It wasn't passed it's feeding date yet, so it should still work fine, but the taste may have suffered a little. That and I decided to skip the slow ferment, just to see how much of a difference it makes (and it fits better into my schedule!)

 

I really like Kayser, even after only two formula adaptations!

 

Let me know if you revisit this bread!

 

Freerk