The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

bakery in san fransisco

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bubble's picture
bubble

bakery in san fransisco

After trial and error on baking sourdough bread, I decided to go to San fransico to learn deeper.
I would love to get the opportunity to work with a bakery in SF for a week or two just to understand the cycle so i can apply it in my bakery. Any one can give me suggestion ?
many thanks.

quickquiche's picture
quickquiche

Hello,

So you say you went to San Francisco to learn deeper. Did you go to the San Francisco Baking Institute?

Since you only want to work in a bakery for a couple weeks, perhaps an internship would be a good way to go. I would doubt if a bakery would "hire" someone to only work for them for two weeks.

Best of luck.

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'd endorse quickquiche's suggestion. The Artisan II workshop is 5 days long and is on sourdough baking. You would get the outstanding course content, access to gifted instruction and contact with a variety of baker-classmates with lots of experience in different environments to share.

The tuition is not cheap, but I believe you get more than your money's worth.

David

bubble's picture
bubble

Quickquiche, yes, that's what I mean, an internship in a sourdough bakery. I don't mean to be paid working in a bakery, I just need to get the experience and understanding the sourdough bakery cycle.

David, I believe I will learn a lot at SFBI, thank you for encouraging me. I run my bakery for 9 years but not producing sourdough. I want to introduce slowly sourdough bread to my customers, but need to be sure with what I am doing.

bubble's picture
bubble

Quickquiche, yes, that's what I mean, an internship in a sourdough bakery. I don't mean to be paid working in a bakery, I just need to get the experience and understanding the sourdough bakery cycle.

David, I believe I will learn a lot at SFBI, thank you for encouraging me. I run my bakery for 9 years but not producing sourdough. I want to introduce slowly sourdough bread to my customers, but need to be sure with what I am doing.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I suggest starting to understand the process and how to keep a culture, feed and care for it and finally bake with it right in your own kitchen first. We have some excellent help available in the search tool at the top. Here is a place to start.

The Pineapple solution Part 1

Part 2

If you just want to go right to the action and get the formula, scroll down to where you see Day 1: If you want to understand the science behind this a little and have the mind to be interested, I recommend this thread. Many of us have learned to use a natural starter or sourdough starter as it is also known from this or similar threads. There are many ways to get a starter culture going but this one uses an acid, pineapple juice, to prevent bad bacteria from catching on and smelling up the culture. It is a reasonably fast way to turn a small amount of whole grain flour into a natural starter. Depending on your conditions, you should be able to use your starter to rise bread in around 7-10 days.

There is nothing about San Fransisco that will be any better for learning about baking sourdough than you can find in your own kitchen. Well, the classes that are taught at the SFBI are excellent and generally I believe most of the students get a lot out of the class. I think you would get more out of it if you already had some prior experience before spending for the class.

You should be able to use your natural yeast/bacteria in place of commercial yeast easily since you already are familiar with the basic process. Unless you go out of your way to use a method of fermenting that creates more acids, your breads will not have the sour tang typically associated with the term "sourdough".  I'm sure there are plenty of folks here who will be happy to assist if you have questions along the way.

Eric

bubble's picture
bubble

I've been following the hamelman book for a year and try some of his recipe. Currently, I am working on Tartine bread which using much higher hidration, so I learn to proof the bread in a basket.  Still, can not slash the bread as beatifully as it should be.

My problem here is to understand the flour. In my country, we can find Rye, Whomemeal, Brown bread flour but I am not sure

the quality. It comes in a 10 kg sack with instruction of just adding water, yeast, salt, white flour. I 've been thinking that it has been premix with other thing or has been processed.   For example, for Wholemeal flour I read the composition is white flour, wheat skin, improver, sugar, gluten and salt.  There is also brown bread concentrate that don't event mention the composition, but it said

Product for bread and rolls containing brand with pleasant, slighty malty taste,  quatity of addition 10%.

Also another flour with composition of wheat flour, malted wheat flour partly roasted, soybean grits, rye flour, linseed, dried wheat gluten, citric acid, flour treatment agent, amylaceous enzymes, etc.

What do you think about those flour?

I have been trying to modify the recipe using possible local flour or resources like cassava flour, arrowroot flour, rice brand flour,

but taste weird.  Is it possible to make bread with 100% gluten free flour that taste good?

many thanks,

Anna