The Fresh Loaf

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Recycle rye recipe

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johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Recycle rye recipe

This recipe is inspired by quite a few recipes I've read the past few months. In my opinion this makes an excellent rye loaf.

Ingredients:

  • 300 g Cold water
  • 100 g 5-grain
  • 100 g Stale rye bread
  • 100 g Sourdough (click for my recipe)
  • 5 g Fresh active yeast
  • 10 g Sea salt
  • 200 g Whole rye flour
  • 200 g Graham flour
Pour the water into a bowl and dissolve the yeast. Put the grain mixture and the stale bread, which you have shreadded into tiny bits, into the water. Let it soak for 15 minutes or so.Add the sourdough and salt, mix. Start adding the flour, little by little to make it easier to get a smooth dough.Start kneading. The dough should be rather sticky and difficult to knead, unlike white breads. But you need to knead it for a while to heat up the dough and activate the yeast.Leave it to rise until doubled. I left it for 90 minutes and then I put it into the fridge over night. The next morning I took it out, shaped it into a loaf in a baking tin. Let it again rise to about double size. Just make sure it doesn't overrise and collapse on itself.Get your oven to max heat and place the loaf on the bottom shelf. Turn the heat down to 170 degrees celcius and bake for around 90 minutes, until it makes a hollow sound when you knock on the bottom.If you enjoyed the bread, repeat the process when it gets stale.

Comments

chefscook's picture
chefscook

Nice looking how is the crumb and spring Thank you Chefscook

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

The crust was incredibly crispy. I might have baked it for a little too long, but it was delicious. 

The crumb is my idea of a standard rye bread, it's tight and crumbly, not dry but nothing like a french bread. Very tasty and suitable to savory meals.

scottsourdough's picture
scottsourdough

Looks great! Can you explain your five grain mix?  Have you tried using a soaker? In the rye formula I've been working on lately, I'm using something like 40% of the flour in the soaker.

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Well, the five grain mix is something I didn't quite know how to translate into English. It's five types of whole unmilled grains.

A soaker? Never even heard of that. Now it's your turn to explain.

scottsourdough's picture
scottsourdough

In a soaker you just mix some of the flour (or unmilled grains) overnight. Doing this is supposed to improves their texture and makes them sweeter. You could try soaking your five grain mix with an equal weight of water overnight and try it out. 

johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Overnight, that seems like a good idea, might even try that out right now, since I'm baking this tomorrow.

I'm familiar with the concept, although we ususally call it a "pre-dough". Translating baking language prooves to be a challenge.

But thanks, Scott!

buzduganel's picture
buzduganel

What kind of question is that. Of course we should recycle. And the more technology evolves the more we will be able to recycle, until one day we will recycle everything becoming self-sustaining. But for now at least in my community we talked with our local  and pay 1 dollar extra for two trucks to take what can be recycled separately to the recycling plant.