The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

my first manitoba flour has arrived!

freerk's picture
freerk

my first manitoba flour has arrived!

Hey TFL-ers,

 

I received my order of Manitoba. Of course I will be browsing around for formula's and recipes to make the best of my first bake with this much praised flour.

 

Nevertheless I would be very happy to hear from you; what is your favorite formula/recipe with Manitoba?

 

hope to hear from you all,

 

Freerk

 

goodforbusiness's picture
goodforbusiness

Where did you get this flour from? I've done a quick google search and most of the sites that pop up are in German or are about hockey. :)

freerk's picture
freerk

I sent you a message here on TFL with details on where you can order Manitoba!

campechanoguti's picture
campechanoguti

Hi Guys.
I have been trying to buy this flour for quite a while now. Is there an option of how can I order it online? I am currently in the Cayman Islands so I need that and I am quite in a hurry.
I hope to hear from you soon
Kind Regards
Manuel

PeterS's picture
PeterS

I suggest that any US or Canadian high protein (14%) spring wheat flour will be similar. Any of the major US mills have one. KA Sir Lancelot is a good product.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/king-arthur-sir-lancelot-unbleached-hi-gluten-flour-3-lb

Guisto's Hi Performer will work, too. They sell it in 5lb bags. 

http://giustos.com/home_baker/flours/bread-flours/case-high-performer-high-protein-unbleached-white-flour.html

Both of these companies ship small quantities (and both these products are available in 50lb bags), but you should email them to see if they will ship to the Caymans. I would think they could air freight if you are willing to pay...

You might also try to contact a local tortilla maker or manufacturer and see where they get their flour. I don't think they use high gluten flour, but their flour supplier may be able to source it for you.

 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hey freerk,

Good to see you got your new flour.

My favourite use for manitoba flour is in enriched doughs. For dough that needs to be both strong and extensible I mix 70-80% Waitrose Own Canadian (Saskatchewan manitoba), with an organic 00 Italian flour. I used this for both the panettone and the ensaimadas

Wishing you happy baking with this new flour! Daisy_A

AndrewR's picture
AndrewR

Daisy,

 Do you know where I can buy Manitoba flour in the U.S.?

Many thanks,

AndrewR

 

freerk's picture
freerk

My thoughts exactly!

I decided to go for the most enriched bread I ever made: Frisian Sugarbread, based on the "Rich Man's Brioche". The final dough is in the fridge proofing for 1 hour now. Curious to see this battle ;-)

I am going to shape them into individual cupcake style servings this time, it's a big riser with the usual flour, so... Manitoba, come and do your magic :-)

Thanks for that formula tip for the ensaimadas. I am definitely going to try (jo's way, I didn't try that one yet, with your flour mix. I tasted the original (without filling) and it was crunchy and separated al the way to the core, and not chewy like my best attempt so far. A nice golden brown on the first 3 or 4 or so layers, and than fading to a creamy yellow, pale, but just crusty enough. I am thinking of baking longer on a lower temp, and trying to stretch that dough even thinner.

I have all this great stuff coming in by mail right now; malt powder to try and make that leaner version of the Dutch "waldkorn" loaf and pearl sugar for the sugar bread. Great stuff at reasonable prices!

Have a good weekend

X Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Mmm...your latest ensaimada sounds delicious. I tried the formula on the link below but found the hydration too low to allow me to incorporate all the flour, so I adjusted the water to fit the Madrid Tiene Miga hydration, that is 100 ml water to 300 ml strong flour. 

http://ileypanes2.tripod.com/id19.html

Using manitoba flour I could stretch the mixture pretty thinly. 

Hope you enjoy the malt. I have used malt flakes and powder in mixed grain sourdough, following write ups on TFL about its use in miches. The malt gave a delicious, nutty taste. The traditional Hovis bread that I used to have as a child is malted, so maybe that is a familiar taste?

Pearl sugar is ridiculously hard to get in the UK and expensive. Zeb kindly put me onto a place near the Swedish Embassy that did it, but it's like gold dust elsewhere.

Frisian sugar loaf. I remember you made that before. I checked back and I'm sure manitoba would be a help in such an enriched dough. Look forward to seeing how it turns out!

Best wishes, Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Daisy!

 

I'm still out of lard till the end of the week (my source was promising me more than he could handle :-|) so I cannot give Jo's formula a try yet. So far the Madrid Tiene Biga formula worked best for me. Now that I have my Manitoba flour, I'm really looking forward to making another one! I'm gonna go thin, thinner thinnest!

 

I tried my Manitoba on a 50% whole wheat loaf with seeds yesterday. Now I truly know the meaning of "strong flour";  I had to step up my pace to keep up with the dough! That was a first in my baking carreer :-) Can't wait to use this flour on the Filone as well, and finally get the volume I am always looking for with that bread. Happy baker here.

 

Ah...The Frisian Sugarbread (muffin style) were good. They are my biggest vice, the ultimate comfort food for me. I have never achieved the stickyness of half caramelized pearl sugar all through the dough the way I remember it, completely covered in chunks of gooey luxury (I know, it's disgusting, but bare with me, it was fed to me all through my tender years ;-)) The pearl sugar I got this time were smaller, and not really doing the job in the dough. The just melted away :-| But I saw that one coming and saved most of my pearls to push in on top of the muffins right before putting it in the oven. I'm happy to say none of this has been photographed. They were gone as soon as they were cool enough :-) The entire staff of Hard Rock Cafe Amsterdam (where my partner is a manager) sang in joy over the phone later that night.

Sounds like we could set up a nice little business when it comes to pearl sugar. I get it for 1.25 € per 200 gr! For how much are they selling it over there, and is it much in demand? And are we talking about the same stuff?

 

The malt powder.. I'm not sure... in the last loaf it was fine. The first time I put way too much and ended up with .... a black turd, pffff. I have to play around with it, but somehow it feels like cheating a bit. Which is nonsense, because I'm more than willing on any occasion to take out the malt syrup.... :-)

 

Your lemon bread is calling me! These weeks I have the privilege to work in the Muiderslot (the Amsterdam Castle), a great location, and my collegues are pushing me to come up with something that fits the image bread wise. Something that goes with a nice pasta salad. Salmon, shrimp, mmmm, yeah, that could work. Delicate! But it'll have to wait till the weekend comes along. Ah well, halfway there already!

O yeah! I made the other crackle cookie recipe you mention in one of your posts on the subject (the one I believe you didn't come around to make yet) .... the first one with the chili is much better to my taste. I like the chili choco thing. and less sweet, and much more... gooey (what is it with me and that word today, lol) on the inside.

See ya!

 

Freerk

 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Sorry to hear about the lard but maybe it means it's good quality? I know our butcher doesn't make their lard unless they have enough good quality stuff to render.

Re the flour: Sweet, high windowpane and laminated doughs certainly do go well with a proportion of manitoba in my experience. It can produce a satisfyingly thin dough! Hope it goes well for you.

Talking of thin how do you remain so slim if you were fed Frisian sugarbread throughout childhood? It does sound delicious, though. I like tart and intense tastes but caramel does that for me as it has that slightly sweet, slightly burnt vibe. Caramel pearls all the way through, Mmm: no wonder the staff of Hard Rock Café Amsterdam were on the 'phone! 

I've also been baking things from my own tradition - Simnel cake and moist fruit cake in general. It feels good to do that sometimes :-)

The love of intense flavours is also why I like the chilli, chocolate combination. Thanks for your feedback. I may stick with the chilli ones then. It makes me laugh, though, when UK food commentators talk about this as a new combination. As you probably knows aso, it's thousand of years old - it's Aztec food LOL. I'm so glad you like it.

We are talking about the same thing with the sugar pearls. Cost is not too much at £1.50  but it's the postage and packing - minimum £7.50! I don't think British bakers use this a lot, though, as it isn't on many of our traditional cakes and pastries. It is lovely, though and good that it can survive baking!

Do enjoy your time at the castle. I googled it - it looks amazing! According to Jan Hedh the lemon bread is a good complement to fish. It is quite lemony. Some bakers have taken down the amount of lemon. I find, however, that if you use whole meal it sweetens the overall mix. Depends on taste. I think it would go well with Scandinavian fish dishes as cured fish dishes in particular can be quite intensely flavoured, although sweet as well as sour if I remember rightly. It sounds like it would be also be good with what you are proposing.

Have a good time and happy baking!

Daisy_A

 

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Lady Daisy!

Swinging by this afternoon for the lard again, that is if the weather will permit me to leave the house. Our meteorological instutute is forecasting 5 cm hail stones for this afternoon... yaiks! On the bright side: if I GET MY LARD I can spend the evening baking (whilst listening to the impact of 5 cm hail stones on parked cars, hmmmm....) We'll see; either way I'm happy tonight's show was cancelled, nothing like some unexpected free time!

 

I can eat what I want without ever worrying about my weight, or at least, no worries of overweight. I am one of those people that fall of the scale on the other end :-( No matter what I try, I can't seem to gain weight, and believe you me, I cook in goose fat and don't hold back on the whipped creme. Still I'm hanging in the nether regions of the BMI.

 

I'm checking the simnel cake! Working on a new fresh starter especially for the lemon bread. I pointed it out as the main culprit in the desastrous first attempt, so I'm working on a nice fiesty one, just like yours :-)

 

 Chili choc rocks! As a matter of fact that is how the whole thing started; a cocoa-drink laced with chili, right?

 

If you ever need a nice batch of big sugar pearls (they sell em in different sizes here!) just give me a shout. I'll be happy to send you some.

 

speak to you soon!

 

Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

That's dedication to baking that you would consider going out in hailstones to get ingredients! Hope all is good for baking. Is the show outside - was it like rain stopped play? We saw a storm blow over Wimbledon while watching the tennis but it has not hit us yet. I wish it would - the humid pre-storm weather feels even worse in a way...

Good that you can eat what you want. I went to an alternative farming conference in Oxford in January and there was one particular research-based paper that was praising the health benefits of well-sourced animal fats, so goose fat and lard seem to be staging a revival...

Glad you looked at the Simnel cake. It can be made as a rich fruit cake too, as the homemade marzipan was the hardest part to be frank. Delicious though...

I think you are right - it was a chocolate drink laced with chilli. You can still get the chocolate disks to make this, I think. 

Might take you up on the sugar pearls if I come across enough recipes that need them. It was to form an edge on some lovely biscuits from a formula from Akiko. Have used coconut up to now. 

Wishing you happy baking! Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

I'll be more than glad to send you some pearls! You know what, I'll give a shout next time I go to the mill where they have the different sizes, and we'll take it from there.

 

The hail hasn't hit Amsterdam yet, but the first serious thunder storm has just passed. The heat is out of the air. Tonight's show wasn't cancelled because of the weather, we have been very lucky so far. All the rainy days we had in the last two weeks it got dry by the time we were to start. Tonight's performance was for a bus of school children, and they cancelled on us. In hindsight, that was a very good decision; tonight we would not have been able to perform because of the weather!

 

I got my lard-fix finally today, so I started preparations for Jo's ensaimada formula. It behaves very differently so far. I have been mixing for ever and ever to achieve a solid window pane, but the dough is very gloppy. I did work it slow, like Jo told me, but after half an hour, and achieving a gloppy window pane, I just decided to let it rise and see what will happen. My hopes are not too high so far, but let's see what happens :-)

 

I'm already sifting through my friends to see who will be traveling to South America first. A friend of ours just left for Mexico, and we will be on the edge of the rain forest in Venezuela (in Puerto Ayacucho)  later on this year, in September, to visit family. That is where the natives live (the 'Indians'), and I remember this market they have... mm, maybe I should ask my mother in law to swing by there and see if she can get me something cocoa there... I LIVE on the honey that she brings us, and that we take with us back home when we visit. It's hand harvested honey from the rain forest (from yellow bees, they call them). It is the most amazing honey I have ever tasted. Can't wait for that again. The last bottle I have  is guarded in my kitchen like pure gold.

 

I'll let you know when in possession of the nice big pearls! Speak to you soon!

 

Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Hope you enjoyed your unexpected night off and that the baking came out well. Good that you got some more lard :-).

The Venezuelan specialities sound delicious - the honey sounds particularly amazing! Sounds like you will enjoy your next visit what with time with family and good food on the horizon!

(By the way I meant to say although not Spanish mother tongue I'm Spanish speaking so if a phrase is tricky in translation feel free to use the original along with the English translation if that is helpful).  

Thank you for your thoughtfulness about the pearls.

Best wishes, Daisy 

freerk's picture
freerk

Ahum, I ordered 3 kilo's of pearls today.... :-o (it really was the cheapest way, and I have enough people around who are going to want some)

 

 

They have the most amazing food in Venezuela! The most interesting and (truly great tasting) weird thing I ever ate over there was a hot sauce called la catara. A specialty of the native local tribes in the Amazon.

 

My lovely in-laws didn't tell me what was in there until I  finished. I loved it though.

I have to take up Spanish again, even though Venezuelan Spanish can be a whole different ballgame at times and doesn't always get me as far as I sometimes think.

We had a wonderful show tonight. There were some descendants of the playwright (17th century)  in the audience. And the castle where we play it, is where he used to live (for a while). They are Americans, and although the kids didn't speak a word of Dutch (let alone 17th century Dutch), they were having a ball. It was a nice piece of... I don't know;  intersecting bits and pieces of history with a royal pinch of reality; then and now and what's to come all in one.

yesterday's bake

 

It was a bit of an ordeal, but they look pretty, and taste very nice! No separation beyond the first layer though. It's a highly enriched dough, almost like a pandoro. The Madrid Tiene formula is much easier to handle as a dough I think. But I managed! I also made another Tortano. Yummy.

X Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Thanks for the message. la catara sounds interesting! Wish I could make a lovely salsa with the tiny arses of the ants that crawl up my legs when tending to the veg. beds! It would be more creative than just squishing them...Pearls sound good also. 

I looked up the play on the Castle's website. Looked very interesting and reminded me very much also of Spanish Golden Age theatre. I'm glad you got a responsive audience. It makes such a difference. 

I was involved once in a conference where students from London's Guildhall Drama course put on a studio version of excerpts of Spanish Golden Age drama. They loved it because they felt that all the themes of characters masking and unmasking, questions of 'who has the power' and 'can I trust the person who seems to love me?' really reflected their lives as C21 young people in London, who were also users of digital social networks. Sad in some ways but very interesting. From what I could see in translation it looks as though some of the themes of the Dutch opus are similar? What an honour to be able to act that in the house in which the playwright lived and in front of some of his descendants. 

It looks like the baking was great also! Those look very golden, shapely and appealing! I must try the Madrid Tiene Miga recipe in its entirety. I use that method. However I started with the second recipe I link to, but with the MTM hydration. It yielded a nice result so I tried it again. However I think it would be interesting to try the MTM version from the start as it seems to be from a good balearic bakery. 

Wishing you continued happy baking, Daisy

 

uncle goosehead's picture
uncle goosehead

Good Canadian spring wheat flour has very high gluten content.  We consider ourselves lucky to have it.  Developed over many decades of breeding to mature in a short growing season and provide what is locally called "hard spring wheat".  I tend to make what we call "elephant bread" periodically because it rises so much when it is mostly the white flour.  You can make very fine 100% whole wheat with it and get a very good rise and crust. 

Having it from Manitoba - the marketting on your bag suggests Mennonite ("mehl") - ethnic protestant Germans who immigrated from eastern Europe.  Flour in Canada currently goes through the Canadian Wheat Board, the gov't agency which has marketted wheat for >100 years, which means that even if labelled Manitoba, it is the same as any flour of the same general type.  There has been controversy so as I recall about the CWB (Cdn Wheat Board) and some wanting its monopoly to end and others wanting it to stay.  Because so many of the world's farmers are subsidized to the detriment of smaller economies, I tend to be biased toward making sure we keep the CWB monopoly and also don't allow corporations and those out of province to own farmland. 

I wonder what you paid, is this 10 kilos?

freerk's picture
freerk

Unfortunately I have no means of verifying where the flour comes from. It was re-bagged in Germany, but on the website they sell it as Canadian, so my guess is they import and re-bag it. Don't know if there are any ethnic protestant Germans involved. I am not sure what you are saying in your post. You mean to say that all flour from the province of Manitoba can be called Manitoba, even if it is not the kind that produces the very interesting sounding "elephant bread"? Any chance you have a formula somewhere here on TFL, I'd love to try!

 

I've had some interesting bakes with this flour already. I first gave it a try on a "rich man's brioche" with added sugar pearls. It did an amazing job! I also experimented with a multi grain mix that was reasonably successful. Most and foremost I noticed the "speed" of the flour. With still some cookies in the oven I had to really crank up my tempo to keep up with the Manitoba! As a European I'm much more accustomed to lower gluten-potential flours and their "rhythm". I still have a lot to learn when it comes to, for example, proofing with Manitoba. At least on one occasion I chucked the dough in the oven before its time, startled about the active rise. I'm thinking of just making a tiny bit of dough and let it go as far as it can to see where its limits are, as an experiment.

 

On the other side: I was curious to see what this flour would do for my most beloved filone bread. It produced a completely different loaf together with the durum flour that goes into that formula! More volume (I was happy with that), but also a completely different texture from what I am used to. When I use "normal" wheat flour in that formula together with the yellowish durum, it goes to a very pale yellow; almost all of the durum-color disappears in the bake. I was surprised to see that in the same formula, this time with Manitoba instead of standard flour, the crumb retained much more yellowness during the bake. I wish I had a picture to show the remarkable difference, but alas; it was eaten before I had a chance to get the camera out. Also the texture of the crumb was completely different; far less chewy and shiny and more spongy. Very nice, but not at all what I associate with Filone.

 

I got 5 kilo's for about € 3,75 a kilo (shipping included) That is quite a price to pay, but still cheaper than some of the local biological flours sold at health stores here in Amsterdam, so it's worth the trouble.

 

I am curious to hear more about the elephant bread!

 

Thanks for your feedback and info!

 

Freerk

uncle goosehead's picture
uncle goosehead

I am travelling right now, since 16 June.   Will be home by 08 July, so will post re 'elephant bread'.  Recipe plan and a photo or two. 

€ 3.75 for 5 kgs? 

This is what I usually get: http://www.rogersfoods.com/pro_flour.htm , whole wheat, white, rye.  Mainly because it is no additive and not bleached. It runs about 50¢/kg if I remember right but seeing as my wife usually shops ....  The other major brand name is Robin Hood, but we don't always see it in 10 kg bags.  Simply a matter of what the local stores carry.  We don't see any American or European flours outside of small quantity health food types of stores. 

Barley and triticale flours are widely available as well.  Ground flax runs about $3/kg, which I frequently add in the attempt to avoid cholesterol lowering medication. 

I think the Manitoba label is just a brandname for standard Cdn flour.  There is no distinction between flour from any province via the federal marketting board, the Canadian Wheat Board, which, by law, is the only agency that can export flour.  -- I just looked up it.  The info is that the wheat board is the only buyer of wheat and barley.  It cannot be sold by a farmer to anyone else.  So what must be going on is that the flour / grain is bought from the CWB and branded and sold.