The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Proofing Yeast without sugar

  • Pin It
Rosamundwo's picture
Rosamundwo

Proofing Yeast without sugar

Hi

I wanna know can i proof yeast without using sugar or honey but proof yeast using mashed banana puree instead???

cranbo's picture
cranbo

why do you need to proof your yeast with sugar at all? 

if your dried yeast is fresh, it will proof just fine by soaking in plain, room temp water for 5 minutes. Sugar is totally unnecessary for proofing yeast. 

I don't see why banana wouldn't work, though, go for it!

Rosamundwo's picture
Rosamundwo

Hi

Mine is "Instant Dry Yeast" i'll kept inside freezer.. is this okay just with plain water only?

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi,

I usually just mix it with the flour. Instant dry yeast doesn't need to be activated.

See the manufacturer's page here, this is the yeast I use. They call it "Quick", but it's the same thing.

Juergen

Just Loafin's picture
Just Loafin

There's no need to proof it at all, unless you have reason to suspect it might be expired. You can add it to your dry ingredients just like any other ingredient. You can even knead it in after dough mixing, it really doesn't matter. You don't even need to bring it to room temp from the freezer, just add it and move on to your next step.

- Keith

ph_kosel's picture
ph_kosel

My understanding is that freezing yeast is not good for it.  I keep mine in the refrigerator, not the freezer, and it stays good for at least a year or so.

cranbo's picture
cranbo

I've had no problem with frozen active dry and instant yeast, maintained in the freezer 1 year or longer. 

That said, I keep a small, dark container that I use for day-to-day baking in the fridge. 

Chuck's picture
Chuck

Yep, even dormant (dried) yeast does a little better if it's not super cold. But the problems seem to be small enough they're swamped by other issues; I've kept some yeast in the freezer compartment in my kitchen for over a year before moving smaller quantities to my fridge for frequent use, and it worked just fine. Now I keep my yeast in tighly sealed screwtop jars (or even better unopened foil bricks) in the vegetable crisper tray at the bottom of my refrigerator compartment. Although that's theoretically better, I must say I haven't actually noticed any difference.

(Dried yeast seems to be even more bothered by moisture than by cold, so putting it in the freezer compartment of a kitchen fridge may be better on balance simply because the door isn't opened nearly as often.)

mimifix's picture
mimifix

When I first began baking bread, long before instant yeast was available, I read that sugar must be used to proof the yeast and always did so. My breadbaking became a business and on several occasions (when I got too distracted or busy) I forgot to add sugar and the breads came out the same. So I would think that mashed bananas are not necessary for proofing, but can still be added if you prefer to use that ingredient.

I no longer own a bakery but I still buy yeast in pound bags and keep them in the freezer. I use the yeast right from the freezer with excellent results.

Mimi

Rosamundwo's picture
Rosamundwo

Thanks for all the comments... 

So the conclusion is proofing yeast in water/ banana/sugar/honey or not proofing at all still have the same result.

And keeping yeast in freezer or not still produce same result..

Interesting!

RuthieG's picture
RuthieG

You probably don't need another answer but I will add that I buy my yeast in the one pound bags that are sold as a bundle of two.  It takes me so long to use the two that I have always kept them in the freezer.  I move a small amount to a regular yeast jar into my fridge.......works beautifully and I am also another that doesn't always bother to proof my yeast....

ob's picture
ob

One more response ...maybe right, maybe wrong, hopefully someone here will KNOW for sure ...

My understanding is that yeast, a single cell mold, cannot break down the complicated double strand carbohydrate that is table sugar.  It can (and does) break down the more simple single strand carbohydrate that is the sugar inside the tangle of proteins in wheat.  If this is true there is nothing grained at all by adding common sugar to yeast being proofed.

Is this correct?

 

 

 

Just Loafin's picture
Just Loafin

That's an easy test...

2 small containers, each with about 90-100 degree F water. Add a pinch to maybe 1/4 tsp sugar to one. Add about 4 grams of yeast to both. Stir well. Observe...

- Keith

ph_kosel's picture
ph_kosel

I'm pretty sure yeast eats sugar and produces CO2 in the process just fine.  I once blew up a gallon jug of homebrew rootbeer (yeast, sugar and flavoring) because of that fact - I left the cap on too tight.

Rosamundwo's picture
Rosamundwo

Hi guys..

I just proof yeast and mashed banana.. is the same as adding sugar.. it works!