The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Roller Mills

b-white's picture
b-white

Roller Mills

I am a homebrewer and I recently got a Monster Mill 3 roller mill (http://www.monsterbrewinghardware.com/mm-3.html). My wife has been interested in making her own bread, even milling her own grain. I was hoping that since you can adjust the gap of the rollers from 0-.065" that she would be able to use this mill to make her own flour. I tried doing some research but it seems that very few people use roller mills to make there flour. Is this true? Is it possible to make flour with this kind of mill? Or will she really need another kind of mill to make flour?

Thanks!

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

Sorry to say it will not work- flour for baking is substantially finer than a the type of roller mills that homebrewers use to crack grain.  I used to homebrew "all grain" lagers and ales in my younger days with several 50 pound sacks of malt in my basement plus a broad variety of the specialty grains...  The good news is for about $250 you will have a very happy baking wife with a mill that should last many years.  Mine is still going strong after 15 years.  There are lots of posts on this site about favorite mills, check it out...  Hope this helps, happy brewing...

b-white's picture
b-white

That's a bummer. That was of the ways I was justifying such a nice mill. Oh well. So even with the rollers set at its tightest .000" it wont be fine enough?

Thanks for the info! 

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

If you set it to zero, nothing will go through.  If you set it so something can go through, the grains will go through broken to that size in one dimension.  In the other dimension they will be whatever size they can be.  Consider rolled oats as an example.  Rolled oats are the thickness of the roller gap that created them, but much wider in the other two dimensions.  Flour comes from abrading or breaking the grain into parts that are small in all three dimensions.

Maybe you can sell it as a way to make freshly rolled grains for breakfast cereal?  Flour mills often are not good at that.

 

proth5's picture
proth5

a hand turned roller mill (Marcato) that seems similar in general design to the Monster Mill.  It does a nice job of creating flakes (for cooked cereal, soakers, etc.) It claims to be able to produce flour at the finest setting. It does not.  It produces something that is not exactly flakes, but is coarse flour of very inferior quality - not really suitable for being the primary grain in bread baking.

If you read my blogs, you will find that I have a very nice mill for creating flour for baking, but as the poster above mentions, it does a very poor job in creating "flakes."  The Marcato serves that purpose very well.  Beyond being able to roll you own oats, you can also roll other grains for cereal or for inclusions in the bread baking process. Being able to do this yourself gives the baker a muc wider range of flaked grains than can be had at the local mega-mart (or even on the interweb...)

Industrial roller mills are used to produce most commercial flour - they are very different beasts and not suitable for most home millers.

Good luck justifying a really cool toy...

 

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

I used to use a corona mill to crack the grains, they were really easy to work with and rather cheap vs "roller mill"...  So perhaps this type of mill for your brewing and a real flour mill for the lady in your life?  perhaps...  Avoid a kitchen aid mill attachment - great for cracking brew grains, but not worth the aggrevation for baking...

b-white's picture
b-white

Thanks for all the input. When the time comes and she is ready to get into making her own flour then I now know what to look for.