The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Brioche a tete shaping methods

yy's picture
yy

Brioche a tete shaping methods

I'm getting ready to make some brioche a tete, and I'm debating between two shaping methods:

1. The "deep pocket" method (start at 0:50)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiSTcIrI-eA

2.The "poke-a-hole" method (start at 1:35)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeCEHU9toqU

Does anybody have experience with both these methods? It seems that method 2 results in excellent definition of the tete, but that the bottom of each brioche doesn't sit in the mold all the way. The outcome seems to be a misshapen bottom (if you see the part in video 2 toward the end, where he places the brioche on the cooling rack, you can see the uneven bottoms).

Has anyone had success with method 1?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Not sitting level on the rack is just that, not sitting level on the rack, not so import as the rack spaces are rather large so I wouldn't expect them to sit straight.  The buns are smaller in the first video and I will bet the dough is warmer.   If you were to make small ones, that would be the better way.  If the dough is cold, make them like the second video because you can work with the dough more.   Because the dough is cold, no flour is used in shaping.  

Two methods.  Up to you which you prefer.  If I hand long nails, I'd go with #2 for they just might cut off the center ball of dough when pushing down.  I also like using less flour when shaping.  If I wanted the overflow look on the plate, I's go for #2.  If I wanted one served sitting upright and prim, I'd go for #1.

yy's picture
yy

Upon closer observation, I have to insist that the bottoms in video number 2 are indeed uneven. It seems that due to the donut-like shape of the base, some of the brioches did not fill the contours of the mold. Anyhow, I guess personal trial and error is the best way to go this time around. It's just always nice to learn from the experience of others.

Dave323's picture
Dave323

with your assessment of the bottoms in #2. I believe they are deformed because he used more dough than #1, so the brioche really did not fit well in the tins he was using. If you like method #2, I would try it with a smaller dough ball, so it will settle into the bottom of the cup when baking. I suspect that the bottoms would come out flat then. Also, please do NOT use a massive cooling rack like he did. Use something with a small grid structure, instead of one capable of holding 10 Kg loaves!  :)

Bake on.

varda's picture
varda

As in some future life, I hope to make brioche, I really enjoyed watching these two videos.   No experience here, but it seems like the Hitz one is the more elegant approach.   And you could always push it down a bit to flatten the bottom.  -Varda

AW's picture
AW

Thanks for the terrific videos, yy, and the wonderful responses, everyone. I have a little time off work and would like to try doing this so I really appreciate the knowledge share. I have purchased the grid-like cooling racks and have never looked back. If the weather cools off I might try my hand at these this week.

-Arlene

 

yy's picture
yy

I use a wire grid cooling rack. Harder to clean, perhaps, but definitely more practical than the one in the video. My oven rack barely has spaces that big!

I ended up going with method 2 (poking a hole and pulling the head through), which worked out nicely. I made sure to shape the base into a blunt cone so that the bottom made contact with the mold, and then pushed them down a little bit, as Varda suggested. Here were the results:

The bottoms came out a little blonde, probably because they were inside shiny light silver molds, placed on a reflective light silver sheet pan. I'll probably lower the oven rack next time so that the bottoms get almost as brown as the tops. I also neglected to grease the tins because I rationalized that 50% butter content in the dough was probably sufficient to have a non-stick effect. Not so. You can tell that the outer skin is ripped a bit. 

AW's picture
AW

These are incredible little beauties. You are inspiring me!

-Arlene

varda's picture
varda

Whose formula did you use?    -Varda

PastryPaul's picture
PastryPaul

After years of using traditional methods, I discovered the poke a hole method and have been using it ever since. BTW: These babies are beautiful as they are. I would happily place them in my showcase.

Good Job

yy's picture
yy

Thanks for the kind comments :-) I used Ciril Hitz' formula from Baking Artisan Bread. I've tried Peter Reinhart's middle class brioche formula before, but I found it too heavy on the eggs. The brioche gets a spongy texture that I don't like.