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Hydration adjustment in recipe

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goose13's picture
goose13

Hydration adjustment in recipe

I recently started a 60% hydration starter due to some problems I have been having with my 100%. It looks like it's coming along great but I had a question regarding recipe adjustments, and I couldn't get a definitive answer using the search. I did find a spreadsheet however, but it's a bit daunting at the moment, and I haven't quite wrapped my head around it yet.

The recipe I have been using calls for 100%, how can I adjust for 60%? Is it as simple as adding more water to the recipe to make up for the loss in water in the starter? Also, should I use less starter than is originally called for?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

ananda's picture
ananda

it is that simple, Ryan.

Work out the total hydration amount rquired for the full dough.   Look at the amount of water in your leaven.   Take this away from the amount you need in total, and that is what is needed for your final dough.

I work all my recipes out like this; my preferred method over a spreadsheet.

Best wishes

Andy

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Ryan.

The process of converting hydration is pretty simple, once you understand the necessary calculations. I wrote out the process, since your question is frequently asked. Because I went through each step with explanations, it looks more complicated than it is.

Anyway, here's a link, and I hope you find it helpful: Converting starter hydrations: A Tutorial. Or through thick and thin and vice versa

David

goose13's picture
goose13

I actualy used your calculations from that post to make my 60% from another 100% starter I was having trouble with. It was super helpful. But what I'm actually asking is, how would I adjust the measurements for a sourdough that calls for say 9 oz of 100% hydration starter, but instead use a 60%, or any other percent for that matter. It just so happens I am using a 60%, but the same could be asked for any other variation.

I guess what I'm asking is for the final recipe, not specifically the starter itself.

 

Ryan

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Your recipe calls for 9 oz of 100% hydration starter. That would consist of 4.5 oz of water and 4.5 oz of flour.

You want to keep the amount of pre-fermented flour constant, so you need to know the amount of a 60% hydration starter that contains 4.5 oz of flour. A 60% hydration starter has 160 parts (100 parts flour and 60 parts water). An amount of this containing 4.5 oz of flour would contain 4.5 oz x 0.6 = 2.7 oz of water, so the weight of the starter would be 4.5 oz + 2.7 oz = 7.2 oz.

Now, this 7.2 oz of 60% hydration starter contains less water than the 9 oz of 100% stater would - 4.5 oz - 2.7 = 1.8 oz less. Therefore, you should add 1.8 oz of additional water to the dough to achieve the same consistency you would have gotten using 9 oz of 100% hydration starter.

Okay?

David

goose13's picture
goose13

Yes. I would have gotten that same number I'm sure, but it would likely have taken me a bit longer. =D

Thanks,

Ryan