The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Apricot Yeast Water Pullman Loaf

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Apricot Yeast Water Pullman Loaf

Apricot Yeast Water Pullman Loaf

Previously, I posted a short Pullman loaf leavened with Potato Yeast Water (PYW). Link:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23793/potato-yeast-water-pullman-loaf-shorty

In that post, I concluded that “Although, I found PYW worked well, and made a good loaf, I decided that the making of the levain, and creating another YW seems unjustified just to introduce potato flakes and sugar into a loaf.” In this post, I simplified the process by introducing the sugar and potato flakes in the Final Dough, and used a strong Apricot Yeast Water (AYW) culture as very nearly the total water used in the loaf. The only other water was the approximate 3.8g contained in the unsalted butter used.


The formula above provides the Baker's Percentages of the ingredients, as well as the weight of ingredients actually used for the reduced sized Pullman pan, which only required 482g of dough. The percent hydration level was about 62.2%HL.



A fuller account of the formula, Apricot YW (AYW) 2-stage levain builds, method, and observations can also be found in a PDF of my baking log at this link:

D-b_110529_Apricot YW Pullman 482g_[Photos]_110602-1635 .pdf - https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0B_MScoZfDZkwMWFjMWNiMzktYjNjMy00MzU1LTkxNjQtOTAyZjM5ODQzMThm&hl=en_US



Actually, a 3-Build Levain had been planned, but in a hectic kitchen moment, I started the Final Dough with only the first two levain builds. Fortunately, I caught my error in time to simply add the remaining 100g of AYW and 100g of AP flour into the Final Dough mix and all worked well.


The short Pullman loaf measured (5-5/8” x 4” x 4”)/(14.3 cm x 10.2 cm) and the 482g batch size managed to fill the pan with a 9 hour rise at 82ºF ( 27.8º C) . For additional details, see the notes in the above mentioned PDF.



The crumb texture was soft, but firm, moist and quite flavorful, with a very pleasant fragrance, however, there was no discernible taste of apricot that I could detect.



It worked very well as both a sandwich bread and for excellent toast.



It has survived three and one half days, as of this writing (I had a loaf in front of it to eat, too). I just had another sandwich made from it and it seems as moist and fresh as it did when first cut. The flavor enhancement resulting from the Apricot YW, rather than just the Potato YW used in some previous loaves, is a fine improvement of the formula. I do think, however, that I will do the Build-#3 as a levain build on the next loaf, rather than mixing the 100g of AYW and AP flour in the final dough. On the other hand, this accident demonstrated that a great loaf can be made this way, as well.

Ron

Comments

teketeke's picture
teketeke

  Ron,

The crumb looks very moist as well you describe!  I printed out your formula to try. :)  I am also curious of using potato flakes in the dough with apricot yeast water.    Sometimes, A mistake gives me a big surprise and pleasure.  Your accident of missing levain#3 should give you smile, too :) 

Great write up as always!

Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, you are right, mistakes often can teach much ;-) Potato flakes are a very easy way to increase shelf life and moistness into a loaf. They are exactly equal to potato flour. You must be careful not to think it is same as potato starch 'flour' though - that is different and it is like tapioca starch.

Ron

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Ron,

That is a very delicious looking sandwich loaf. So evenly formed and such great crumb development. You must be very pleased.

Best wishes, Daisy_A

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Ah, Daisy, the pleasure is in the eating, LOL, but yes, the esthetics were very pleasing as well ;-)

Thank you the kind were.

Ron

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Bet it tasted great! Looks perfect for toast and sandwiches, as you say :-). Is it too late to beg a slice? LOL  Daisy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Never to late to beg, Daisy, it is , however, a bit late to get. ;-)

Ron

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Well, here's to happy anticipation of the next one then :-). My little virtual plate and knife are ready. Daisy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Daisy, your name has been carefully place on the guest list ;-)

Ron

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

I used this recipe with my RYW, increased the yield to 600g (for 6 really big buns!), and used Franko's pineapple/macadamia nut sticky bun for filling plus candied ginger (chopped fine).  I did the 3-step build, overnight retard and shaped and let rise 7.5 hours before baking @ 385*F for 20 minutes.

photos here

 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Wow,  Your sticky buns look superb!  Franko's pineapple/macademia nut sticky buns with your original version of using Ron's formula is amazing, Pamela!   All of your bread with yeast water are really great! 

Happy baking,

Akiko

breadbythecreek's picture
breadbythecreek

But I wanted to do them with only wild yeast not commercial- I don't like the yeasty taste with dried yeast. Only with Ron's recipe could I put the two together-yeah! Ron!

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I accept no responsibility.

Ron

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Pamela, I am glad it workout so well. Great photo documentation, too. I just wish the photos didn't make me so hungry  LOL

Ron

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

 

A beautifuil loaf.  Dare I try to replicate this  ;-P ?  I have a new bottle of apricot yeast water that I "jump start" with my existing ryw and it was fizzing and foaming in less than 8 hrs and waiting to be tested.  I have some potato flour but not potato flakes (now that I know what they are, they remind me of the instant mash potatoes we were served at school dinners...  I don't see instant mash on the supermarket shelves anymore or maybe I haven't reallly looked closely.  Potatoes are inexpensive and easily available, it would cost more to use the imported potato flakes...but I digresss.. back to bread talk.  Would it be possible to replace flakes with potato flour?   - Judy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Yes, Judy. On a weight for weight basis. Potato flour and potato flakes should be interchangeable. But, NOT potato starch (flour) that is something different - that is = to corn starch, or tapioca starch.

Ron

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

for the info re potato flour.  Mine is very white and it resembles more like cornstarch than potato flour (I'd expect potato flour to have a slightly yellowish tinge, just a guess as that's how I remember instant mash to be)  I'll check out my local and see if I can see a difference in the  two products before I embark on this ambitious project. - Judy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Judy, if it is just potato starch (the wrong stuff) in the Nutrition Facts on the package it should be nearly total Carbohydrate, with perhaps a bit of Potassium. Those two should be just about everything - if it is the wrong stuff (potato starch).

 

kim's picture
kim

Hi Ron,

I can see your Pullman loaf is getting perfect each time you bake especially your shaping skills (I admire you have that particular skills) and the result is stunning for me. I love your last photo shot.

Kimmy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Kimmy, I am glad to see your comment, but on this last Pullman, I simply followed the example of Akiko's demonstration in an earlier post of her's. It is always easier to follow than to lead - Thank you Akiko for that example.

Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Ron, Thank your for your compliment!  You made my day!

Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, you are more than welcome.

Ron