The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Apricot Yeast Water Test Loaf

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Apricot Yeast Water Test Loaf

Apricot Yeast Water Test Loaf  [Update:110530-1000] 

   If you are unfamilar with Yeast Waters, and wild yeast, you may wish to view

Yeast Water & Other Wee Beastie Bubbles (No Math)

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23441/yeast-water-amp-other-wee-beastie-bubbles-no-math

This was my first chance to test Apricot Yeast Water. I have intend to for a while, but wanted to wait for fresh fruit to be available. I did find some this week and started a culture with 3 of the small fresh apricots, jump-started the culture with a bit of my Apple YW.

I have heard that the dark dried apricots make a very strong levain – the more common dried fruit that are a yellowish orange have been treated with sulfur-containing compounds to keep their color (and kill the WBBs). So, the only dried apricots to use are the dark brown unsulfured fruit. Not wishing to waste time and effort, I wanted fresh, organic apricots, which start being available May through August in the northern hemisphere.

I was impressed with how fast the culture became active, and equally surprised how fast the activity ended. I tasted the YW to see if, somehow , it had gotten too alcoholic so fast. All I detected was no noticeable sweetness, and decided it must be a lack of sugar. I dropped in a sugar cube and within a very short time it became very active – so much so, that I feared the foamy head might fill the remaining air space in the glass container. It did not take long before the activity decreased nearly as fast as it had restarted.



It only took a few trials to conclude the apricot WBBs have a real thing about sugars. So, I decided to do a test of the leavening strength of the new culture. I took a small quantity of just the water, about 20g and mixed it with an equal amount of AP flour. I set this up with a clock beside it, and in front of a time lapse digital video recorded. You can see the results on YouTube, Link:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23719/time-lapse-video-apricot-yw-levain


The result was a doubling in about 2 hours. Certainly a good showing for a brand new YW culture. So, a test loaf seemed quite justified.



I started the Apricot Yeast Water Levain (AYWL) builds. Details of my standard test loaf can be found here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23694/standard-kiss-loaf-or-keep-it-simple-smiley


Details of this loaf are in the table below:



A copy of my personal test log can be found at Google Doc Link:

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0B_MScoZfDZkwMTIyM2E1ZjQtYWFlMi00Y2I5LWFiYTktMWI5ZGMzYTgzMzgw&hl=en_US



I had some surprises in store, however. I generally, hold each of my chosen 3-build levain developments to a 24 hour period. Instead, a late afternoon to early evening completed Builds-#1, and #2 with #3 started and placed in retard at 40ºF/4.4ºC for an overnight. Details can be found in the log.

 

The next morning, I did the shaping that basically matches the pan bread version detailed by txframer here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/20669/sourdough-pan-de-mie-how-make-quotshreddablyquot-soft-bread

The dough pan was covered with food cap and place in the proof box at 82ºF/27.8ºC. Most loaves that I do, which are similar to these conditions, will need a 6 hour final proof. I was rather shocked when at 4½ hours I found it was as high as any “normal” fully proofed dough. I did a rapid catch-up and dough was in the DO, with the cup of boiling water, and into the oven, within a 5 minute period. Again, details can be found in the PDF log.

From a cold oven start and oven set to max (450ºF/232ºC) in the DO it was steamed for 20 minutes. Lid removed at 20 minutes and the temperature dropped to 400ºF/204ºC with a total of 45 minutes for the baking.

The finished loaf had an internal 207.7ºF/97.6ºC and a hot weight of 437g – down 8% during the baking. The loaf was cooled on wire for over an hour, before cutting.



The loaf had a very nice aroma, but neither taste, nor smell indicated the apricot components in the loaf. The crumb color was softly off-white in the orange-brown range, but only in a small degree. Texture was moist and softer than my general SD loaves. A pleasantly fruity, slightly sweetish flavor. The top crust portion was chewier than I would have expected, but quite acceptable.

   I should, also mention, I could detect no tang at all. I had expected a bit from the apricot flavor itself. But, any tang vanished along with any apricot specific flavor.

 

The crumb was exactly as expected, given the 60% HL (hydration level) and the highly developed windowpane test it was kneaded to.


Based upon this single test loaf, apricot WBBs develop much stronger levain than any I have seen before. The Apricot YW rise times are somewhere between 25% faster, or if you are one of  the half empty glass types, the other Yeast Waters are 33% slower ;-)

Update:110530-1000I have just had a couple additional slices of this Apricot YW loaf. In the 23 hours since baking, there has been a flavor change. It is still quite pleasant, but definitely less sweetness. The change is hard to describe, but while it is NOT "astringent", that is the closest word I can think of to describe the very slight difference in flavor. My initial reaction was 'use a bit less than 2% salt, next time'.

Ron



Comments

Syd's picture
Syd

Gorgeous looking sandwich loaf, Ron.  And just the kind of crumb I like for my sandwich loaves.

All the best,

Syd

RonRay's picture
RonRay

That is just what I, too, like in the way of crumb in sandwich bread. I did think the flavor was pretty good, as well. I better edit it and mention the total absence of tang, as well. There are some people that don't love the SD tang, as much as I love it ;-)

Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

  Hi Ron,

That is a very nice looking loaf,!   Very nice crust, too.  The crumb structure is beautiful as usual.  I saw you tried a cold oven! :P  Your cold oven's start temperature was set up higher than I use. That will be a good idea to get nice golden color .

Thank you for sharing your great looking loaf, Ron!

Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, I almost always start from a cold oven when using the Turkey pan Dutch Oven. That keeps the cup of boiling water inside of the covered Turkey pan boiling until it is all gone (about 19 to 21 minutes) when the cover is removed. That is because the lower element on the electric range will stay on from a cold start for about 18 to 20 minutes, while it takes the oven up to Max Temp.  It is the best steam method I've ever tried - as long as you have removed the oven stones before you start, so the lower element reaches the turkey pan and not the stones instead.

Ron

p.s. I should add that you want the 2-B-bread elevated from the TP floor and protected from contact with the cup of boiling water poured on the TP flour just before the TP cover is put on. If the loaf-2-B, is in a pan, then any "spacer" is fine. On my initial tries, I used two SS table knives to elevate the bread pans. I have fashion a more permanent method now.

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Your Turkey pan Dutch Oven method is pretty interesting to me, Ron!  A turkey pan is my next shopping list. :P   I better look for it at the garage sales at first.   It is a good time to go hunting some baking stuff around my area, however, the gas cost will be more than the cost LOL

Happy baking,

Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, last week I saw them in Kmart for the same price I paid nearly a year ago - $19.95, which is a lot cheaper than the $94 I paid for an 8 Qt. enameled cast iron DO that kills me to lift from a hot oven.

Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Ron,

I haven't noticed your oven temperature method until now.  I looked up your others, then I saw you are clearly mentioning a cold oven LOL That sillys me.  Please bare with me missing something very important in your recipes!

Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, if we never missed anything, life would have far fewer surprises - and get really boring ;-)

Ron

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Me thinks you are one who rarely experiences boredom Ron.....far to inquiring of a mind possesses you.

Now it appears as though you are dealing with YW on steroids!  LOL

Amazing how fast the apricots acted despite your controlled conditions - ain't that life - someone always around who wants to break the rules ;*).

Yet, once again, you are the Master because you knew exactly what to do to curb it's feistiness and get excellent results.

What a beautiful loaf!  Txfarmer sure has helped many of us improve our sandwich loaves - shape and texture.  

Another one for my binders.....In fact I had to go to OM yesterday to get a couple of extra binders due to the expansion my originals have been exhibiting lately.  Bulging almost as quickly as you apricot YW did!  :-D

Thanks again for sharing you work with us!  

Janet

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Janet, true, boredom is infrequent. It is usually a lack of time that plagues me.  :(

I thank you for the kind words on the loaf.

I must agree that many of us owe txfarmer a debt of gratitude for the many interesting and informative postings, which she has made on TFL.

Ron

varda's picture
varda

Ron,  I've been trying to hold out against your yeast waters.   But you make it more and more difficult  with each post.   Lovely bread.   -Varda

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Varda, it is easy to understand why you have succeeded in holding out. When I see all those great loaves you produce, where would you get time to mess with still another levain? :D

But, I am glad you drop in to look at them, and thanks for the kind words ;-)

Ron

ananda's picture
ananda

Ron, you are posting on such a great topic in minute detail too.

And, what lovely bread as a result.

Methinks this will be keeping me busy for sometime to come too

Best wishes

Andy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Andy, it is an area filled with interesting surprises at every turn (for me, at any rate). I have wanted to know the history of it, but keep coming up with little documentation. There are indications that it may be one of the oldest methods of leavening in Japan, but only vague statements.

Vegetables, fruit, herbs, and even pine needles seem to have been used at different places to produce the Yeast Water. Once a culture has been produced, it seems to remain a reasonable leavening agent for extended periods without feeding.  I find that in the creation of mead - honey fermented alcohol, which is the oldest of man's alcoholic endeavors - there is a whole range of mead types differentiated on a basis of what source of wild yeast is brought into the mix.

It is almost as interesting as bread itself  LOL

 Ron

Bee18's picture
Bee18

It's so interesting how things develop. Yesterday I was looking at the organic section in my sm and saw this apricots imported from Turquie. I understood that they were different from the other also call organic but I didn't buy them as I already had 2 boxes of organic sultanas in my trolley. I never heard or seen this black dry apricots before.
Now that you have make your incredible new water yeast and the superbe result with your bread I will go back today to this super market and buy a sachel, as here in Australia it is not the season of summer fruits.. it's winter and apart from apples and citrus fruits I don't have many choices.
I learned so much reading your posts about fruits that are all covered with wax or oils or what ever else preservative which stop the process. now I'm very aware and I read every box or organic sachel I take in my hand to be absolutely sure that it's the pure stuff. Thank you so much. Your posts are great and very easy to read understand and keep after printing.
Bea

RonRay's picture
RonRay

It is interesting to me, how we bump along. wondering if anyone reads what we post, only to have someone like you come along and say such nice things about them.

Thank you. :)

Ron

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Bea,

I believe your description is that of "Unsulphured Apricots".   The bright orange ones are treated with Sulphur Dioxide as a preservative.   The black ones to which you refer, have not been chemically treated!   My hunch is they will make a far better source for yeast too, especially if they are Organic!

Best wishes

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Ron,

How interesting, of course!

The procedures you are investigating epitomise wine production.

In the UK the connection between bread and beer is probably of greater importance.

I'm seeing much more connection between a fermenting dough and beer on the one hand, and your "yeast water" and the production of wine.

Fascinating!

I'm still sticking in there with posts about making good old "Pain de Campagne" amazing myself at the power of my wheat levain when properly fed, and the flavours from genuine local flour.

But I did say to Daisy_A that I would be looking at this some point this year.   Jan Hedh's Artisan Bread is my instant reference point.   Many thanks to you for taking it to a whole new level!

Best wishes

Andy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

There is this rumor that the WBBs are really Martians that had to leave Mars, because they drank all of the water... (I just started the rumor).

But, I can say that I have discovered the the Apple YW stored in the fridge, works very well in ice tea when you forget to refill the water bottle. However, a word of caution, do give it to minors - it might be illegal.

Ah yes, in the UK the baking and beer making were, if not the same, were at least next door neighbors, until Pasture - if I remember correctly.  I do promise not to call bram sourdough    LOL

Ron

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Ron,

This is a good read from Dan Lepard: http://www.bakeryinfo.co.uk/news/fullstory.php/aid/7596/Barmy_days_for_bread.html

Better stay away fro that "Yellow Snow"!

Best wishes

Andy

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Thanks for the link. I enjoyed the article.

BTW, I stay inside when it snows... :-)

Ron

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Ron,
Your loaf is picture-perfect! I love the blistered and crackled crust, the shaping and scoring, and crumb.
Your baking method is interesting, and your apricot YW ever so successful!
Now that our summer fruit season is approaching, I may give fruit YW a try.
Thanks so much for your very informative posts on this subject!
:^) from breadsong

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I do appreciate your kind words. I think you might find YW a bit of fun. Sort of like "following the fruits through the seasons", and if you really like the method, you can "winter over" with apple YW or any of the dried fruits - raisins seem popular with many.

I, personally, find Yeast Water combined with SD works very well in many cases, particularly for those who wish a tang, but a bit of a lighter tang in the bread.

I think most of the basics are now rather well covered in postings, and they will be there for reference... ;-)

Ron