The Fresh Loaf

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Making Your Own Linen Brotform Liners

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Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Making Your Own Linen Brotform Liners

I had read that hemp linen makes wonderful bratform liners.  I decided to give it a try and ordered myself a yard from Dharma Trading Company.

While waiting it's arrival I decided I had better make a prototype out of scrap material before attempting to make one using the hemp.

I know having pictures has helped me immensely when baking bread or pretty much making anything by hand so, assuming there are others out 'there' with similar learning styles I took pictures of what I did and now here are my instructions for anyone who would like to save a lot of money by making your own liners.

  • Deciding on a circle size. I wanted a liner that would fit my 8"- 9" baskets as well as fit my small baskets.  (A large liner can fit smaller sizes but a small liner can not fit a large size so this is my rendition of one-size-fits all. ;^)  
  •  I found a round pillow that had a 18"-20" diameter and that was my 'pattern'.
  • Once my circle was cut. I folded it in half and cut it in half and then I cut the 1/2s in half -leaving me with 4 - 1/4 pieces of a circle.
  • And then I began to construct a circle again.  (By cutting the circle and sewing it back together it lies more evenly in the basket....seems odd but it works!)
  • I used a 1/4th" seam allowance to stitch my seam.  I sewed it together and then I went back over it with a zig-zag stitch to prevent the salvage edges from raveling.  (My machine is a 40 year old Kenmore - my first sewing machine and still going strong but, alas, it does not do surged seams....)

  • After I had stitched both halves individually I then stitched them together to make a whole circle again...
  • All seams continued to be sewn with 1/4" seam allowance and then zig-zagged..
  • Now for the elastic casing hem.  I choose 3/4" woven non-roll elastic.  (Came in 1yd. packaging for less than 2.00. One package has enough elastic for 2 liners the size I made.)
  • I basted a line of stitching 1" in from the outside edge to be my hem allowance guide.
  • I folded the casing edge along that 1" line of stitching and sewed it securely along the edge making sure I maintained a 3/4" space to pull my elastic through.
  • I left an opening for the elastic to be drawn through and I made sure all the seams were stitched down facing the same direction so when pulling the elastic through there wouldn't be any interference with seams being in the way.
  • I then pulled the elastic through using a safety pin.  (I left the elastic long knowing I could tighten it once I had the tension correct.)
My computer has decided not to download my last 2 photos - showing the final product.....hopefully what I have been able to download is enough to make this an easy process for someone.Out of 1 yard of 60" fabric I was able to make 5 liners.  A yard of hemp cost about 15.00 a yard and I can't remember what the postage was but essentially I have 5 linen liners for under 25.00.Had I ordered pre-made liners each would have cost about 12.00.....60.00 total...Each liner took about 30 minutes to make so I figure I came out ahead ;^).  Having a sewing machine helps!Good Luck to anyone who attempts doing this.  I will try to add a couple of more pictures later if I can get my computer to cooperate.(Hemp linen has the same properties as regular linen.  Is very washable - in any temp. of water.  These liners will out last me!  They are sturdy things!!!)Enjoy,Janet
RonRay's picture
RonRay

Janet, just how does one go about running a sewing machine? ;-)

Ron

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Ron,

 I rarely go about running with mine.  My jogging days are long gone - too hard on this body.  ;^)

Janet

RonRay's picture
RonRay

And here I thought I could finally learn how to use the one I bought - and never used LOL

Ron

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Ron, 

Being of sound self centered mind I will not instruct you on the use of your un-used sewing machine as it will distract you from my primary goal for you which is for you to run studies using fresh home milled whole wheat flours with your AWY so that you can then inform all of us here - but ME primarily - on how home milled grains differ from store bought WW or AP or BF when combined with YW.

I know you probably do not own a mill YET but what an excellent opportunity to trade in your sewing machine for something you will put to good use - if not for yourself - for ME.  

I have a cupboard overflowing with more liners than I will ever use and am only more than happy to supply you with one rather than you waste your precious time learning the intricacies of running a sewing machine....and, knowing what I know about you based on all the information you have provided us with here on YW.....I can only imagine all the studies and charts you would end up making to keep track of your machines performance and we would probably loose you to a sewing forum which means my unanswered question about whole grains will forever be unanswered and I will go to my grave with that mystery laying heavily on my heart.....and I have heard that is what creates ghosts.....people not yet satisfied who must have closure before moving on.....and that means TFL will have a ghost as one of it's members.

So, I think it best not to distract you from my primary purpose for you with sewing lessons at this time....

ROFL

Janet

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Janet, why do I get the feeling someone is trying to con me? ;-)

Actually, I have more than enough liners from TMB Baking.  Now, as for me getting a mill. That is way out at the 0.001 probability level. Remember, I eat alone. When I can buy flour that experts have formulated, from the best grains, processes under controlled conditions, and then delivered locally, were I can be baking with them within hours of having a whim for an odd one, now I'd have to be really bonkers to want a mill to grind my own grains into inferior flour...

Now, if it were something that turned me on, say as the father of 15 kids, that would be a different proposition... but that isn't likely LOL

Sorry, Janet.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Oh rats....I sense the jig is up. :°(

I know when I am beat and there is no way I can compete with your argument.

Alas, I must take the road of the lonely experimenter using my family as guinea pigs...that unavoidable road less traveled....

LOL

May your Memorial Day be a kind one :-)

Janet

Keith Sherwin's picture
Keith Sherwin

Hi Janet,

Just wondering which type of Hemp Linen you used.

Dharma have the #HLW - heavy weight hemp and they have the #HM a lighter Summer weight.

Hope it was the HLW as that is what I ordered :-)). They sure are friendly & helpful.

Thanks,

Keith

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Keith,

I used the heavy weight.  To tell the truth now though I don't use them.....I simply coat my brotforms with rice flour and don't run into any doughs sticking anymore....BUT most of my doughs are pretty firm - about 65-75% HL which makes a big difference....

Hope this helps some!
Janet 

Keith Sherwin's picture
Keith Sherwin

Thanks Janet,

I have several uses for the hemp so I am happy I ordered the right weight.

In addition to the brotform liner, I plan on trying to make my own 16" super peel for pizza as well as a proofing cloth for Baguettes.

All the best,

Keith

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Keith,

I think you will be pleased with the cloth.  I don't make baguettes but those who do say a good couche makes all the difference.

Just be sure to hem the raw edges as the stuff does unravel when put through the washing machine....

Janet