The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What is edelhefe?

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bwraith's picture
bwraith

What is edelhefe?

We have a German high school exchange student staying with us. He saw me doing my sourdough miche, and next thing you know, his grandmother had some recipes she emailed for me to try, including one with spelt in it. So, now our student is trying to translate the recipes to English. One of the ingredients is called "edelhefe", but we can't figure out how to translate that. Anyone know what this is?

Thanks, Bill

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Bill,

 

Babelfish renders edelhefe as "noble yeast".  Dunno if that helps you at all.  It didn't clear things up for me.

 

Do any of the recipes look like they would be worth sharing?

 

PMcCool

tony's picture
tony

Babelfish is on the right track, apparently. My copyright 1926 German-English, English-German dictionary doesn't have "edelhefe;" but it does define "edel" as an adjective or adverb meaning "highborn, noble, lofty, exalted, precious, excellent," and "Hefe" as a noun meaning "yeast, barm, dregs, sediment". "Hefengebact" (with umlaut over the "a") means bread or pastry baked with yeast. Edelhefe would be the precious leaven, most likely, the starter cared for between batches of dough production.

 

Tony

bwraith's picture
bwraith

We are currently thinking it is nutritional yeast flakes, but we aren't totally sure. Yes, if I make these recipes, it would be fun to post the recipe and results here. For one thing, I think he will want to show my results to his grandmother. He's going back to Germany, probably before I do his recipes, so posting them here would be the perfect way to show the results to them in Germany.

kilosa's picture
kilosa

my wife, who is german, says it is nutritinal yeast flakes purchased under varying names in germany, you can google the name and verify the correctness

 

 

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Thanks for verifying that. I did google it, but most of what came up was in German, and we were having a hard time making sure that's really what it was. The German exchange student was describing "flakes" and we were looking at various pictures of packages, and we did end up suspecting it was nutritional yeast flakes. Again, thanks, this gives me much more confidence I've got the right ingredient.

kilosa's picture
kilosa

love to have any potential recipes. we just cannot duplicate the bread made in germany. it presumably has to do with the german flour

good luck

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Dried thin yeast flakes.   Sorry.  

 Noble Yeast
 
Dr. Ritter Noble Yeast is an easily digestible molasses yeast in flakes which is preserved by drying. Furthermore, Dr. Ritter Noble Yeast also contains amino acids, minerals and trace elements.

Dr. Ritter Noble Yeast serves as a dietary supplement with B vitamins, minerals and trace elements and can also be used as a low sodium spice.
Thanks to its sharp-spicy taste, Dr. Ritter Edelhefe are also suitable for sprinkling on many types of food, soups, vegetable wheat diet products and many more.

Dr. Ritter Noble Yeast, just like all other yeasts, is one of the high-purine food. In cases of purine (uric acid) metabolic disorders, it should be renounced the intake of yeast.

Nutritional Information per 100 g:
Energy 1196 kJ/283 kcal; protein 49,3 g; carbohydrates 13,0 g, thereof sugar 0,2 g; fat 3,7 g, thereof saturated fatty acids 0,5 g; dietary fibres 25,2 g; sodium 0,055 g; vitamin B1 35,6 mg; vitamin B2 3,9 mg.