The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Soys and Linseeds Sourdough - One heathly loaf

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MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Soys and Linseeds Sourdough - One heathly loaf

I made this same bread before some months ago combining Jeffrey Hamelman’s method and Bourke Street Bakery recipe (not entirely). This time I followed Bourke Street Bakery’s recipe closely. Umm, closely, I actually increased the amount of both soy beans and linseeds substantially (double the amount for both soys and linseeds), upped the amount of water a little (hydration percentage) and replaced 10% of bread flour with whole wheat flour.

The recipe called for soy flour, which I didn’t use in my previous bakes. I didn’t think that I was able to find the flour and I was not a fan of buying a big bag of ingredient specifically for one recipe. However, I also like to experiment with new things/new flours and I came across soy flour at Asian grocery store. The flour has very interesting texture. It was moist, creamy and mushy. It felt almost like the blended soy beans, only drier.

I was glad that I included soy flour into the dough as suggested by the recipe. The flour added moisture, tenderness and creamy colour to the crumbs. The bread was lovely, nutty and full of textures. I was also surprised how sweet the bread was, which I believe the soy flour must have contributed to some of the sweetness.

Soy beans in the bread tasted amazing, I love the texture and its creamy nutty flavour. It was just lovely.  I am also wondering if soy and linseed bread is Australian thing or it is something common. 

Full post and recipe is here.

Sue

http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

Comments

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Hi Sue

Your bread looks very inviting. We do see soy & linseed breads here too, both industrially produced and artisan versions. I don't know the history, so until someone else adds a comment, let's call it an Australasian thing.

Cheers, Robyn

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

It could be ANZ thing (Au & NZ). I first came across the bread in the commercial version, produced by Burgen (a healthy version of supermarket bread). 

I did searched on Google and most of the page results came from Australia. 

Thanks for the info, a cure for my curiosity. 

Sue

Syd's picture
Syd

That certainly does look healthy, Sue!  And a lovely open crumb, too.  You always use such interesting ingredients.  I know that soy flour is an additive to regular bread flour because it is considered to be a flour improver.  I love the taste of soy beans, too.

Have you made any croissants lately?

All the best,

Syd

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Thanks Syd. 

Soy flour as a bread improver sounds interesting. I'm wondering what effects it would make to loaves. Now that I have a kilo of soy flour, I would love to try that. What percentage should I use to start with? 5%? 10%?

I made Tartine Morning Buns last weekend (with orange zest and cinnamon sugar) using croissant dough. It was heavenly. Will be making wholewheat croissant (ABAP formula) next weekend, looking forwards to try that.

Cheers, Sue 

Syd's picture
Syd

Sue, this is from Taste of Home Recipes:

Soy flour is a great source of high-quality protein, dietary fiber and important phytochemicals, such as isoflavones. Soy isoflavones are believed to act as antioxidants and have other beneficial effects on blood vessels and the heart. Soy flour is also a good source of iron, B vitamins and calcium. If you use the following guidelines when baking with soy flour, you shouldn't have to add more leavening. Here are some tips:

  • In yeast breads, try replacing 15% of the wheat flour with soy flour. An easy way to do this is to put about 2 tablespoons of soy flour into a 1-cup measuring cup before filling it with wheat flour. Wheat flour provides gluten, which gives structure to the bread, so it cannot be entirely replaced.
  • Quick breads can accommodate up to 25% soy flour. For each cup of flour called for, use 1/4 cup soy flour and 3/4 cup wheat flour or all-purpose flour.
  • Baked products containing soy flour may brown more quickly. Try reducing the baking time or lowering the oven temperature by 25°. Then keep a close watch on whatever you are baking.
  • Stir soy flour before measuring it since it can become packed down in its container.
  • Lightly "toasting" soy flour before using it in a recipe enhances its nutty flavor. Briefly heat soy flour in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally.

I just did some quick googling and it seems the addition of soy can help:

  •  improve volume
  • lengthen shelf life
  • help with crust colouration
  • improve elasticity

In fact, it can even be used for making croissants (you will be pleased to know) where it will help prevent the dough from tearing.  Check out this PDF where they mention defatted soy flour and lecithinated soy flour and talk about percentages as little as 2 - 3% making a difference.  I am off to buy a bag. I can already see how this week is going to pan out:  up to 10 tabs simultaneously opened in my browser, all to do with soy as a flour improver, obsessing over percentages, trying to fit soy into my existing recipes, waking up in the middle of the night thinking about soy...

Best,

Syd

 

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

I did search about soy flour in TFL (and ABAP and Bread books) and didn't find much info about soy flour, sometimes I just forgot about Google and straight to TFL for anything breads. 

Toasting the flour sounds interesting and I think would help removing the moisture significantly. I'd love to try that. 

One thing I found is that this bread was stale a bit quicklier than usual, which I supposed that moisture from soy flour could have something to do with it. 

Now that you've got your brain going with all soy, I'd love to hear about your experiments with them:)

Sue

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Sue,
Your bread looks very tasty!
I'm curious as to how soybeans taste in bread now, seeing your wonderful post, and Karin's Korntaler.
Thanks for posting this, and to both you and Syd for the discussion on soy flour.
:^) from breadsong

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Soy beans tasted great in the bread, it enhanced the texture and taste.

Karin's Korntaler uses dry soy beans in the dough as is (without soaking), which I am curious what it would be like, in term of texture. I will have to try that to find out:)

Sue

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Hi Sue,

You loaf looks very nice!  I love the texture of using dry soybeans in the dough. When I bit off a slice of  the crumb with soybeans, The nice crunchy texture and flavor came out in my mouth when I made Karin's Korntaler . Thank you for the link, breadsong :)   I enjoy reading Syd and you conversation on soy flour.

Best wishes,

Akiko

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Umm, I will now have to try adding dry soy beans into the bread. I'm really curious now how it would taste like.

Sue

teketeke's picture
teketeke

  I thought the drybeans might came out really hard and disturb me while eating.  It came out really good texture.  The crumb is very soft, which is a good match between the soybeans and crumb.

Akiko