The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bauernbrot

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wassisname's picture
wassisname

Bauernbrot

*Edited to add formula.  Pretty sure this is what I did.  Now that I look at it again it could probably stand some tinkering.

I’d heard that freshly ground coriander seeds were altogether different from the prepackaged powder, but… Wow!  Now I get it.  And, as for what freshly ground coriander does to a hearty rye, I have not the words.  But I do have the bread.

This is a half whole rye, half whole wheat loaf.  I fed my WW starter with rye to build it up with a long, long fermentation time, leaving it with loads of flavor but not much leavening power.  A bit of instant yeast solved that problem.

The result was just what I’d hoped, a hearty loaf with an aroma that is permanently imprinted on my brain.

Oh, and I generally avoid using traditional names for my bread (I just don’t have the energy to argue over “authenticity”) but since I tested this one on actual Germans, who did seemed pleased with the result, I’m going for it on this occasion. 

Marcus

Startergrams   
Dark Rye Flour150100% Mix 3-4 min
Water11577% Ferment at least 12 hrs
Initial Starter5033%  
total315   
     
Finalgrams   
Starter31534% autolyse flour and water 20 min
Whole Wheat Flour50054% mix all 
Dark Rye Flour42546% Alternate kneading/resting 10-12 min
Water64069% Ferment 1 1/2 hrs
Salt161.73% shape (2 loaves)
Instant Yeast121.30% Proof 1 hr
Ground Coriander121% bake w/ steam
total1920  475F 8 min
    425F 40 min
Finishedgrams   
Whole Wheat Flour50047%  
Dark Rye Flour57553%  
Water77672%  
Salt161.49%  
Yeast121.12%  
Ground Coriander        121%  
total1941   
     
Initial starter contribution   
Whole Wheat Flour2957%  
Water2175%  
total50   
     
% of flour in starter3%  
starter as % of finished dough16%  
     
salt in tsp2 3/4   
yeast in tsp2 1/4   

Comments

louie brown's picture
louie brown

a beautiful loaf. I am more fascinated with German breads and baking since I've been reading this site. And there's nothing like grinding your own spices, is there?

I would love to find a book on German bread baking in English. Any ideas?

wassisname's picture
wassisname

I wish I could help with the book, but no.  Love the idea, though.  Come to think of it, I don't think I've ever really looked for one.  Maybe someone out there knows...

Perhaps my next quest should be to find one in German and see how far it gets me.  

jolvista's picture
jolvista

There is a very good bread baking blog in German www.ketex.de He has gotten a book deal, but still in German, you can translate it with Google

Syd's picture
Syd

Now that bread is just crying out for cured meats and/or some strong flavoured cheeses.  Wonderful looking  bread!

Best,

Syd

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

down on the farm is to feed them bauernbrot like this!  Nicely done, Marcus.

If you are into spice fragrances now, try toasting equal quantities of coriander seed, fennel seed and caraway seed before grinding them and stirring them into your next rye.  Heavenly!

Paul

wassisname's picture
wassisname

jolvista - thanks for the link.  I just checked out the blog - Schwartzbierroggenbrot?  How can I possibly resist!  Between my rusty German and Google this shouldn't be too difficult to work out.

Syd - yes, it stands up nicely to strong flavors.  Bring me more cheese, any cheese!

Paul - my brain starts to seize-up just thinking about the possibilities.  I'm still a little hesitant to toast them, I tried that first and burned them to a crisp - not a good smell, and not an easy smell to get out of the house!  But I'll summon the courage again soon... and this time I won't walk away!

Marcus

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

and a comparatively low heat.  It also helps to give the skillet a swirl or a shake every minute or so.  If you want to indulge your inner chef, you can even do the saute toss.  What I've learned is to keep an eye on the fennel seeds.  The coriander seeds are already a tan color and the caraway seeds are brown, so they're no help.  The fennel, though, start out with a greenish cast that turns to golden at the right degree of doneness.  Then it's time to get the skillet off the heat!  

You are right about the scorched odor being unpleasant.  Properly toasted, the aroma is divine!

Paul

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Can you post the procedure, please? I love it!

wassisname's picture
wassisname

... I should have included that from the beginning, bad form on my part, but... I... seem... to... have... umm... misplaced my notes.  They've got to be here somewhere.  I'll work on it.  =)

rhomp2002's picture
rhomp2002

German guy with a great baking blog in English.  Highly recommend. 

http://theinversecook.wordpress.com/

He also has come out with a Kindle bread baking book.

 

 

 

louie brown's picture
louie brown

and there does seem to be a book or two in English. Honestly, though, we have a terrific resource right here on this site. I'm a newcomer to German baking, but between what I see here and the bakery photos, I'm a fan, looking forward to learning more.

wassisname's picture
wassisname

As much time as I spend here and elsewhere looking for bread ideas it's just not the same as having a big, beautiful bread book to pore over again and again.  But I'm probably a little old fashioned that way.  Not that a book is necessarily more practical, but it's like a kind of meditation.  Relaxing, somehow.  Fills the mind and clears the head at the same time.  I should stop now.  Maybe go shop for a new bread book.

Marcus

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Rye and coriander is common in Russian ryes like Borodinsky.

Jeff

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Which brings up another thing I love about bread: the way one leads to another, leads to another, leads to another... and however far around the world my bread goes, it always comes back to... bread!

Marcus

Christl's picture
Christl

Beautiful bread, so proud of you. I can almost smell the coriander.

Christl

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks mom   =)