The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pretzels

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Pretzels

 

Delicious and easy-to-make PRETZELS


 

Recipe and more photos - you are invited to check at my blog
It's in Hebrew, Google translator is on top left side-bar 

Comments

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hi, loved your post.  Pretzles are lots of fun to make.  I presume your bake temperature is in Centigrade (˚C).  235˚C = 455˚F.

I also got a good laugh from the translator - the "boiling" step prior to baking was translated as "baptism."  Too funny.

 

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Thank you!
Yes - temperature is in centigrade.

I agree - the translating something makes me laugh.
Challah - which is Jewish bread (my specialty) is translated to "apply"  

Syd's picture
Syd

They look beautiful!

Syd

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Hi Syd

Apreciate your comment, thanks 

Jessica Weissman's picture
Jessica Weissman

and the translation was fun to read...but can I substitute regular cow's milk for the soy milk?  I can't digest too much soy.  I realize they won't be pareve that way, but it's not an issue.

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Hi
Thanks for your comment

Sure you can use regular milk  I use soy-milk to make it parve

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hi Winnie,

Apropos of this discussion on pretzels, I came across this article from Harold McGee several months ago.  He recommends that instead of baking soda as a substitute for lye in cooking, you can use what he calls "baked soda."  Here is a link to the article: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/15/dining/15curious.html?ref=dining&pagewanted=print .  As I understand it, heating baking soda to 250-300˚F (120-150˚C) for an hour converts the sodium bicarbonate in the soda to sodium carbonate, which is more alkaline and so it achieves a reaction that is closer to commercial baking with lye.  It is something that I have wanted to try for pretzels but haven't gotten around to it yet.  You may want to have a look to see if it is of any interest to you.  I'd be curious what you learn if you do give it a try.

Brad

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Hi Brad

Thanks a lot!

I have never heard of "baked soda" before, but it sounds interesting, and I'd like to give it a try

copyu's picture
copyu

try the search function (top left of your screen) with 'pretzel' or 'lye' as search words...or visit this thread:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23492/soda-ash-dip-pretzels

Best,

copyu

Winnish's picture
Winnish

I appreciate the information.

Thank you

copyu's picture
copyu

You got a nice, dark color even without using a strong alkali. Using the translator, it appears that you added sugar to the water for simmering...is that correct? That may account for the nice color. I stopped using the baking soda method 30 years ago, because it didn't produce the results I wanted. I had only one recipe back then (before the internet) and there was no mention of putting sugar in the 'bath'. I use the 'scary' Brezellauge, now, but adding sugar is a good 'trick' to remember. Nice web-site you have, too!

Cheers,

copyu 

 

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Hi copyu

Yes - I used sugar. I added 1.5 tbs of sugar to about 3lts of water.

Thank you very much for nice words regarding my blog, I appreciate it!

p.s - what's "Brezellauge" ??

copyu's picture
copyu

and it means Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH)

There is a lot of controversial discussion about this issue on 'pretzel-related' threads and I'm almost exhausted reading and talking about it!

[Recently, someone also mentioned that we shouldn't use 'Kosher salt' on our pretzels and gave a convincing argument as to why not, but I can't remember the reasons...] Please wear flame-proof body-armor if you join these discussions!

Meanwhile, just keep up the great baking and blogging...

Best,

copyu

 

Winnish's picture
Winnish

Oh, no wonder I didn't understand :)

Thanks for the warning! It's not for me to try and participate in these kinds of arguments (I'm too sensitive).

I only know kosher-salt, as I only use kosher food and we don't even have a non-kosher salt here.

BTW - I've just uploaded a new post to my blog (but nothing to do with yeast)