The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Now that's an ear!

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Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

Now that's an ear!

It wasn't exactly what I intended . . .  

I wanted to try to stencil with a young grape leaf, but I hadn't planned out how I was going to score around the grape leaf.  So I did two "smiles" framing the grape leaf and this is the result.  Not exactly the best scoring job of my amatuer "career"!

I didn't do the best job shaping this dough, either.  It was ABin5 dough that sat in the bucket a full week, and it was pretty wet.  I usually work a little harder on the shaping and use a little more flour to get a firmer "skin" than I did here.  Then the boule would have held its shape  better and not spread out during baking as unevenly as it did.  I baked it in my clay baker. 

Still, it was an impressive gringe, and the bread was tasty enough for a rye done with very little effort.  My back is bothering me, so long sessions with the mixer or hand kneading are not an option right now. 

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Interesting result. It may not have been what you intended, but the leaf is certainly well defined.

Ron

 

Oldhenwife's picture
Oldhenwife

It's a lovely smile and a great vine leaf imprint. You've given me an idea, thanks!

Mary

sam's picture
sam

I think it is a great looking boule!

(Did you use a bread machine for that?   :-)  )   kidding.

Anjali's picture
Anjali

I like the bread and gvz's comment.

Anjali

varda's picture
varda

I think ears are like crackles.   They come of their own accord.  Very nice boule.   As an aside, I see you are using the TFL accidentally coined word - gringe.   This appears nowhere else except on this site, as far as I can tell.   -Varda

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I googled "gringe" and a not very nice definition came up first (BLUSH!)

But googling "grigne" does show a lot of references outside of TFL for what I meant. 

Now I'm totally embarassed!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

varda's picture
varda

not a nice word but nice bread and that's what counts.  -Varda

JerryLeeBee's picture
JerryLeeBee

Okay - someone please explain 'gringe' to a n00b to the site!

LiliN's picture
LiliN

I have achieved similar results baking in Dutch oven bread made by two different recipe:

First loaf was Rewena Paraoa

And the secod one was made  by using the recipe for Artsan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

I have used the same scoring method as You did,  and I like very much the look of these loafs, including Yours :))

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

Lovely breads.

I often get good ears (I'm staying away from the "G" word from now on!) when I have a nice firm skin on the bread--I hold the lame at a very shallow angle to the loaf.  But I was surprised to have gotten any ear, let alone such a dramatic one on this loaf because the skin was not that firm and the lame dragged.  Maybe the cloche baking method helps, too.   

LiliN's picture
LiliN

I was trying to say the same, i.e. both loaves are made from different type of dough, but the scoring and baking methods are the same, so I guess that's why the final result is quite similar. And both times the dough was on the wet side too.

  Have a nice day, :))

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Janknitz,
I love your grape-leaf-stencilled loaf, and when I saw it, it made me think of this one:
http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2011/03/18/rewena-paraoa/

...and LiliN has posted photos too, of her beautiful rewena paraoa.

All of these lovely loaves make me want to start prowling around the yard looking for stencil material, now that things are starting to leaf out here, where I live!
:^) from breadsong

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

Wild Yeast's blog, but mine did not turn out very pretty at all.  The scoring ruined it. 

Aren't Susan of Wild Yeast's  bread's gorgeous???  I've learned a lot from her. 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello, I agree, Susan's bread is beautiful and her website an amazing resource to see what's possible for breadmaking!
I don't think scoring ruined your loaf at all. I think the 'ear' on the loaf looks like the curling edge of a leaf - a really neat-looking effect - reminiscent of your grape leaf!
:^) from breadsong