The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Crazy idea....ustard in bread flour?

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gringogigante's picture
gringogigante

Crazy idea....ustard in bread flour?

I have been trying to make my on mustard recently (and failing miserably).  I was laying bed thinking about all that mustard powder I had and what to do with it, when I had the (seemingly) brilliant idea....why not add some into some flour and integrate it into the bread!


Obiously, I'm really new to baking bread....but has this been tried before? Or is it a terrible idea? Either way, please explain if you've tried it or have any recipes with yellow (or brown, i guess) mustard seeds ground into powder and integrated into flour.


thanks!

jcking's picture
jcking

Extreme care must be taken when grinding mustard seeds. Mustard gas can be lethal. I can't imagine what would happen if you baked the seeds and wouldn't try it myself.


Jim

gringogigante's picture
gringogigante

Alton Brown can disagree all he wants.


Mustard seeds being ground can in no way cause death. Mustard Gas is a synthetic copy taken from mustard seeds that were then altered to their most volatile extremes.


Can I hav my thead back?

texalp's picture
texalp

 Mustard seeds have littlr to no killing properties of mustard gas. Chemically mustard gas is  C4H8Cl2S. And is not found in nature.


Texalp

jcking's picture
jcking

Alton Brown would dissagree.

G-man's picture
G-man

People have been using mustard for thousands of years. It shows up in recipes from medieval europe and was probably familiar to the Romans, who looooved their condiments. We can't have been using robots for all of that time, which means that at some point folks had to be making the stuff by hand. Mustard gas is a relatively recent development, developed in the 1820s from sulfur dichloride and ethylene. The reason it's called mustard gas is because it smells like mustard.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_mustard


aaaaand here's the CDC saying that it can't be found in nature:


http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/sulfurmustard/basics/facts.asp


 


Making mustard at home is incredibly easy and quite safe.

jcking's picture
jcking

Or did I get you. Totally out of context and apologies all around. Some posts die for lack of interest, I thought tne mustard gas thing would help draw some attention. It did yet it hasn't helped the author. Very sorry. I do remember  AB saying to use caution when grinding your own seeds a few people have had reactions.


Jim

gringogigante's picture
gringogigante

JK!  No harm, amigo. I'm a firearms instructor and hear the craziest stuff from some of my students (I refer to them as the Tin Foil Hat Crowd :-).  thought you were "going there".


I'll let y'all know how it turns out with the Mustard Gas Bread!


 

jcking's picture
jcking

I hope it's just a little more interesting now because more people, myself included, will be interested in the results. Headlines sell papers, Posts with interesting titles attract more flies :) Glad to hear you have a good sense of humor and didn't shoot the messenger. (If I knew about the firearms stuff I would have ducked sooner :-)


Give that Mustard Bread a shot for me,


Jim

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Hi 


I've never used mustard powder on its own in bread - but I have used it along with grated cheese in a loaf. I've also used curry powder, chili powder and many other things in bread. I've come to the conclusion that you can pretty well add anything to your bread with good results.


(For example, I included some curry powder in the pizza bases I made yesterday - I gave one to my neighbour who awarded the pizza 10 out of 10!)


I have used wholegrain mustard along with sausage in a bread dough version of sausage rolls - and it's a good pairing, IMO.


I'd just use a teaspoon to 200g of flour initially, and see how it goes.


I'd be interested to hear how it goes.


Best wishes, Paul


 

G-man's picture
G-man

I really dig making mustard and I've noticed some things that might come in handy for you or which you might make note of:


 


Soaking the mustard in water will bring out the heat. The mustard you get with BBQ Pork in chinese restaurants is basically just mustard powder mixed with water. The longer it sits at room temperature, the hotter it gets. Put it in the refrigerator to stop the process. There is a point at which it will lose heat, I think. I've never had mustard last long enough to find out.


Try soaking the seeds or powder for at least two days in enough water and cider or wine vinegar to cover the seeds plus a bit extra. This really brings out the flavor.


 


In my experience, alcohol such as beer can help mute the heat a little. That said I've had others report that my beer mustard is pretty hot.


 


Cooking can kill the flavor of mustard. Your best bet might be to grind whole seeds up into a very coarse powder instead of a fine powder, or use whole seeds and soak them for a couple days before cooking with them.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

to the dough.  That might be my MO.  My husband loves a slice of rye with butter to fill the pores and then a thin smear of mustard over the entire surface.  Maybe mustard in a rye is worth trying?


http://mynewroots.blogspot.com/2009/04/mustard-to-relish.html

wassisname's picture
wassisname

A formula was posted here a while back featuring mustard and mustard seed, though no ground mustard.  It sounds amazing, probably why it stuck in my head.  It's Franko's Sour Rye with Onion and Mustard if you want to search for it.  If I knew how to do the link thing I would, but... well... I'll work that out another time.


Marcus


 


KMIAA's picture
KMIAA

Don't know if this is what you want or not.  Anyway, here is a link for a recipe


http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/homemade-mustard-recipe/index.html