The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pain au Levain with Light Rye Flour

ananda's picture
ananda

Pain au Levain with Light Rye Flour

 


Pain au Levain with Light Rye FlourDSCF1856


A wonderfully simple and balanced formula.   Yields one loaf scaled @ 680g and one scaled @ 1360g


Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Leaven Elaboration One

 

 

Leaven from stock

 

80

Special CC Flour

 

100

Water

 

60

TOTAL

 

240

 

 

 

2. Leaven Elaboration Two

 

 

Elaboration One

 

240

Special CC Flour

 

300

Water

 

180

TOTAL

 

720

 

53.3 [640g retained]

60g returned to stock

3. Final Dough

 

 

Leaven [from above]

53.3 [33.3 flour, 20 water]

640

Special CC Flour

50

600

Doves Farm Organic Light Rye Flour

16.7

200

Salt

1.8

21.6

Water

50

600

TOTAL

171.8

2061.6

% pre-fermented flour

33.3

 

% hydration

70

 

 

Method:

  • I built the leaven over 2 elaborations, allowing 12 hour proof time between refreshments, and prior to final dough mixing.
  • For the final dough, I broke the ripened leaven into pieces and deposited in the water. Then I added the flour in a large bowl and used a plastic scraper to combine sufficiently for a period of 40 minutes autolyse
  • I added the salt and worked up the dough for 10 minutes, then set to rest for 20 minutes. Then I worked up the dough a further 10 minutes.
  • I bulk proved the dough outside in the warmth and maintained a steady dough temperature of 26°C, covered for 2 hours. I used one S&F half way through bulk proof.
  • After 1 further S&F, then a 10 minute rest, I scaled and divided the dough as above. I moulded both pieces round, and set to final proof upside down in bannetons
  • Here's the rub: the small loaf had around 3 hours final proof, and I experienced "blow-out" from the bottom of the loaf; again! The larger loaf, I therefore gave 5 hours proof and it came out perfectly. I did use quite a bit of steam baking this loaf to try and avoid any further unsightliness.
  • After baking fully, I turned the oven off, and left the loaf inside the cooling oven with the door wedged ajar for 10 minutes. Then I set the loaves to cool on wires

 

DSCF1860

DSCF1857

 

DSCF1858

DSCF1864DSCF1865DSCF1868

 

Thoughts:

  • The longer proof time on the large boule is just right. I have utter confidence in the leavens I maintain, feed and elaborate; also in the quality of final dough produced. I've increased the proportion of pre-fermented flour in the formula, generally, now being around 33%. Also, I'm using longer proof times. Even though the weather is getting warmer, this is the proving conditions demanded by the dough, so I have responded.
  • The taste of this bread is superb. I tried a small piece about an hour ago, and the deep flavours from crust and crumb linger so subtly. It's not overtly sour, or, salty, yet still packs a great and complex flavour.
  • Alison was busy with our plant pot garden, and I helped out tidying the patio as the sun shone, and the dough underwent its magical transformations.
  • We have new daisies to brighten the patio, and I have wood chopped and prepared to fire up the oven later this week.
  • DSCF1853DSCF1855
  • We want to go to Sicily in October.
  • We are going to the far North of Scotland on Saturday for a week's holiday. Lochinver here we come!......And it looks a little bit like this!

images

Very best wishes to you all

Andy

Comments

Franko's picture
Franko

That's a marvelous looking loaf Andy, with the crumb showing all the benefits of a long slow rise resulting in that shiny gelatinization. Also good to see you have the WFO all primed up and ready for action soon. Patio looks great, you've got a weeks vacation ahead of you, life is good now that Spring is with us isn't it?


Have a fun and relaxing week off my friend!


All the best,


Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

That's such a great word Franko ; love it!


I am discovering that good active leavens still produce loaves which need the full fermentation over time.   I'm very happy with the crumb aspects you mention.


Maybe I'll get the oven going tomorrow??


Holidays: they are essential for full enjoyment of life to balance out the daily rigours we all seem to be bound up in.


All good wishes


Andy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you for posting this, Andy!  I have just ordered light rye flour to make more different rye bread with interest.   100% spelt and rye bread without dry yeast is very difficult for me to make such good crumb like you and other TFl members like Franko above..   


It is a very nice cozy looking patio, and a fire wood oven, too! 


Have a great vacation, Andy


P.S Thank you for the good advice on your Borodinsky blog!


Best wishes,


Akiko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Akiko,


Dark Rye is the secret in sourdough baking.   The ash content is the key, providing essential vitamins and minerals for great fermentation.   Light rye gives better volume, but it's pretty claggy stuff.   Are you using white rye flour?   Extraction rate is below 50% for this flour!!!


I suspect you have difficulty with a damp climate in baking where you live.   Given rye flour is very thirsty, but lacking in gluten, I guess that is very challenging.


I'm only too glad to help on Rye Breads; you made a great Borodinsky loaf in the pan; but it needs more colour to do full justice.


All good wishes


Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The bread sounds delicious and the patio and oven look very inviting!  Have a lovely vacation!


My wfo is out from under cover now too : ) and it's strawberry season!


Sylvia

ananda's picture
ananda

Do you have a baking project in mind to combine using your wood-fired oven and including strawberries?   Sounds like a great idea.


Best wishes


Andy

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The gelatinization in the crumb is amazing.


David

ananda's picture
ananda

Thanks David,


I think Franko has pulled out the key theme I have come to appreciate recently.   The topic I raised with you concerning Reinhart's appreciation of dough quality is all important too.   Recently, I have increased the proportion of pre-fermented flour in the formula, and lengthened the fermentation time for the dough.   Blow-outs are such a drag, and I have evry confidence in being able to mix high quality dough.


Very best wishes


Andy 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Andy, Another very nice sourdough loaf - what a beautiful crumb.
Thanks for sharing pictures of your pretty patio - quite a setup with that WFO.
Wishing you a very happy holiday!
from breadsong

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you Breadsong,


The oven can be a bit smoky, but I'm going to fire it up this week, hopefully.


All good wishes


Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely Loaf, Andy! the loaf profile looks rather low, was it due to the high hydration of the final dough, or rather a liquid levain? I'am sure high hydration makes for a wonderful flavor, especially with Rye.


Your patio setup is very attractive! village-like.. I hope you have nice vacation in northern Scotland and sicily!


KHalid

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid,


Yes indeed, the loaf has a fairly flat profile.   Almost miche-like I suppose.   Given its size, that seems reasonable.


High hydration was definitely a contributor.   I feel the long fermentation and high proportion of pre-fermented flour are significant besides.   I use a stiff wheat levain, not a liquid one.


Thanks, I'm sure we'll have great holidays, as always.   Regarding the patio, well, we do live in a village!   I love it


The loaf feels so light to pick up!


Best wishes


Andy

proth5's picture
proth5

is lovely (but you know that, right?) - but you break my heart with the picture of the wee great mountain in North Scotland - a place it didn't think I'd like much, but with which I fell in love.  Have fun!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Pat,


Yes, I'm very happy with the bread, although, I'm possibly happier with a Pain Siegle using a Rye Sour if truth be known.


I first went to the Fort William area of the Highlands over 20 years ago, as a recent convert to hillwalking.   The following year we went up to Ullapool.   I then left the North-East of England for Wester Ross for a year.   It almost worked out, but not quite; so I ended up at Village Bakery, Melmerby instead!


There is nowhere on earth like the far NW Scotland.   I haven't been there in 8 years, and I just can't wait to visit again.   Even so, my life has changesd in so many ways in the meantime.   Alison and I continue to celebrate and move forward.


Very best wishes


Andy


ps. For anyone not in the know: this wonderful mountain in the photo is called "Suilven"

wally's picture
wally

I'm with Franko and the others who've noted it: the crumb is absolutely beautiful with it's translucence and creamy color.

I've not mentioned it before, but the way you write out your recipes make it so easy to follow the details of each step - while giving all the basic info, overall hydration, etc.

Nice bake!
Larry

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Larry,


Many thanks for all your kind words.


I write out my recipe specifications in a way which makes most sense to me.   Total flour adds up to 100%.   I realise that is a little unconventional, but it is fundamental to me.   It then becomes easy to state the amount of pre-fermented flour in the formula.


From there, I establish my desired hydration, take off the moisture already in the pre-ferment, then add in the salt at my preferred level.   The method really is just me thinking through each stage and putting it into typed format.   I'm very happy to know you find it so easy to follow.


Very best wishes


Andy

kim's picture
kim

Andy,


I love your crumb pictures and they are amazing. I think they are good for summer grilled veggies sandwiches. I have to try your recipe when we get more variety vegetables. I always forget to ask you, for your rye recipe, do you recommend reducing leaven in your formula when I move back to hot and humid SE Asian country (at least 24C and above at night) maybe next year or so? How much should I reduce (10 ~ 15% total pre-fermented flour)? Thanks and Have a great vacation. 


Kimmy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Kimmy,


I had Jumbo Prawns, Egg Mayonnaise and Rocket in my lunchtime sandwiches with this bread; wonderful!


I'm sure humidity in SE Asia will have significant effect on your rye fermentation.   Is rye very popular over there???


I can't offer specific advice, as I've never visited this part of the world!


All the best


Andy

kim's picture
kim

Hi Andy,


Really nice sandwiches you had for lunch. Rye is not popular at all in SE Asia (Malaysia) especially high percentage of rye breads. I once baked your Borodinsky and Pain de Siègle for my father friends, my breads ended up in the trash can next day. I saw the bread still in wrapper; I was almost in tear, my breads were well proofed and well baked. We even bought them nice cheeses and cured sausages to go with the bread. Oh well, I cannot blame them for not eating my bread because they are so used to soft and fluffy breads (us version wonder bread) and their main staple is rice. The saddest thing is they don’t know what goes into their breads at all for most people. If I have time in the future, I like to have a small baking classroom. I will pay the TFL members who are willing come over to teach bread classes (people like you). I think people there seriously need a lot education about breads (different variety) and also hand-on bread classes. I’m still debating should I go to SFBI to take their German breads classes this year. Thanks again and Happy Easter.


Kimmy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Kimmy,


I'd love to come out to Malaysia; anytime!


And, yes, you probably should take a course at SFBI.   David's the one to ask about that.


I notice there are a lot of very classy bakers on TFL with Asian origins.   These posters seem to love using rye and wholegrains.   So, I think you are right that it is really a question of facilitating people to change the style of bread they consume.


All good wishes


Andy

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,


Wow - what a wonderful looking loaf! The gelatinised crumb and well developed crust look great. The close ups show that so well. This has inspired me to try a bread flour and light rye mix some time soon. 


Your patio looks good. We have also spent a good few days trying to tame our terrace back  garden! It is getting there...Cut back the seat that is part of the raised herb bed so we could sit out there and have drinks again. 


Have a lovely time in North West Scotland - has to be one of the most beautiful places in the world...


With best wishes, Daisy_A

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Daisy_A,


This loaf turned out very well.   I'm not a massive fan of light rye, but it is great for Borodinsky etc, to give better loaf volume and lightness.   It will not take up water, and is far less interesting than the coarse and fermentable Dark Rye we are both familiar with.   Crumb and crust were both pleasing, but there was a lightness to the loaf as well, even though it weighed in well over a kilo!


I thought of you when I took the patio photos:   Alison has potted up 2 daisy plants recently.   The obvious one is on the left, whilst the one to the right is quite a dramatic purple-flowered species.


I agree; NW Scotland is one of the most beautiful places in the world.   I hope we have the weather to appreciate this, but it is folly to go that far North and expect good weather.   There is no such entitlement; more of a required imagination needed to fully appreciate and enjoy the place...no matter what.


Lovely to hear from you


Very best wishes


Andy