The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Large bâtard made using the formula for the SFBI Miche

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Large bâtard made using the formula for the SFBI Miche


 


This bake was inspired by the very large bâtards Chad Robertson bakes, but the formula is that of the miche we baked in the Artisan II Workshop at the SFBI last December.


I've now baked this bread using the original formula and using all high-extraction flour rather than the mix of “bread flour” and whole wheat. I've made 1.25 kg miches and 2.0 kg miches. I have been curious how the SFBI miche would be as a bâtard, and I wanted to keep the size large, to be better able to compare crumb structure and flavor to the miche/boule shapes I've made with the same dough.


An additional point: This was my first bake using a large, linen-lined oval brotform for proofing.


 


Total formula

 

 

Ingredients

Wt (g)

Baker's %

AP Flour

679

96.67

Whole wheat flour

23

3.3

Water

515

73.33

Wheat germ (toasted)

18

2.5

Salt

15

2.08

Total

1250

177.88


Levain

 

 

Ingredients

Wt (g)

Baker's %

AP flour

70

75

Whole wheat flour

23

25

Water

94

100

Liquid starter

47

50

Total

234

250

  1. Dissolve the starter in the water and mix in the flour. Desired Dough Temperature: 78ºF.

  2. Ferment for 8-12 hours.

 

Final Dough

 

 

Ingredients

Wt (g)

Baker's %

AP flour

586

100

Whole wheat flour

0

0

Water

398

68

Wheat germ (toasted)

18

3

Salt

15

2.5

Levain

234

40

Total

1251

213.5

 

Procedure

  1. In a very large bowl, dissolve the levain in the water. Add the other ingredients, except the salt, and mix thoroughly by hand.

  2. Cover tightly and autolyse for 30-60 minutes.

  3. Sprinkle the salt over the dough and mix thoroughly to incorporate.

  4. Transfer the dough to a clean, lightly oiled bowl.

  5. Ferment for 3-4 hours with 4 folds at 50 minute intervals. (I did this by the “stretch and fold in the bowl” technique.)

  6. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board. Pre-shape as a log.

  7. Cover and let rest for 20-30 minutes to relax the gluten.

  8. Shape as a bâtard and place, seam side up, in a floured banneton.

  9. Cover with plastic and retard overnight in refrigerator.

  10. Remove the loaf from the refrigerator and allow to warm and complete proofing for 1-3 hours. (Watch the dough, not the clock!)

  11. 45-60 minutes before baking, pre-heat the over to 500ºF with baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

  12. When the loaf is proofed, transfer the loaf to a peel. Slash the bâtard as desired, and transfer it to the baking stone. Steam the oven and reduce the temperature to 450ºF.

  13. Bake for 15 minutes, then remove any water remaining in your steaming apparatus.

  14. Continue baking for another 30 minutes or until the loaf is darkly colored, the bottom sounds hollow when thumped and the internal temperature is at least 205ºF. (If you have a convection oven, switch to “Convection Bake” and reduce the oven temperature to 425ºF at this point.)

  15. Remove the bâtard to a cooling rack, and cool thoroughly before slicing.

Bloom and Ear

Crackly Crust

I rested the loaf overnight, wrapped in baker's linen, before slicing and tasting.

Sliced loaf profile

Crumb close-up

The crumb was moderately open. She crust was crunchy, and the crumb was chewy. The flavor was moderately sour with a lovely wheaty flavor but without any harsh grassiness from the whole wheat. This flavor is as close to my notion of a "perfect" sourdough bread flavor as I can imagine. Those who prefer a less assertively tangy bread, might enjoy it more without the cold retardation.

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

 

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Beautiful Batard, David!

ananda's picture
ananda

That looks superb, David, especially the colour in the ear.


I note you shape your dough and retard in the banneton.   I've been shaping mine dough pieces after retarding, and finding it takes a long time for final proof.   Ithink your method will be quicker, but I'm a bit worried about re-experiencing "blow-outs" as the bread bakes.


Any thoughts on this?


I look forward to your crumb and taste follow up


Best wishes


Andy

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Regarding retarding in bulk versus shaped loaves: I don't have either the experience or the theory to explain why your bulk retarded dough should take a long time to proof. If the loaves are well-shaped and well-proofed, I don't get blow outs.


I asked about bulk vs loaf retardation when I was at the SFBI. Without explaining his rationale, Frank said that bulk retardation was most suitable for high-hydration doughs and retarding shaped loaves for lower-hydration doughs.


I'll look at my class notes and share any more information I find.


David

ananda's picture
ananda

Thanks David,


You have to remember I live in cold climes [usually; it's gloriously sunny just now!], so it can take some time for retarded doughs to come back to temperature.   That said, I have a post lined up on this for later: just finished baking for the day, and now need a few photographs before posting later on.


I believe Frank would make these recommendations, because a high hydration loaf retarded in a banneton would have a greater tendency to become stuck.   Aso, it's easier to scale and mould after retarding.   Additionally, so long as the ambient temperature in the bakery was reasonably warm, a wetter dough would probably recover and prove faster than a tighter dough


Many thanks for your comments here


Best wishes


Andy

Syd's picture
Syd

Lovely looking batard, David.  Look forward to seeing the crumb shot. :)


Syd

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Looks beautiful in all ways--shape, color, crust-crackles, grigne.  


My only big oval bannetons are long log-shaped ones.  Yours looks more football-shaped.  Is it from SFBI?  Got a picture?


Thanks.


Glenn

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The bâtard was proofed in a 10.5 inch oval brotform lined with linen. I purchased it from Brotform.com. The liner is easily taken off and replaced. I will use the brotform without the liner for large (2-2.5 lb) rye breads.


Here is a photo of mine:



And here's a link to the vendor: 10.5 Oval Brotform and Liner Combo


BTW, you can buy the brotform and liner separately, but the combo is currently on sale.


David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

And I can almost taste it from here.


Paul

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Crust, crumb, color all look so delicious!


I think the brothforms linings sold at the link above are made of  100 % cotton rather than linen.


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hmmm ... I checked, and you are correct. The liners are cotton! Anyway, it performed well on first use. We'll see how it works over time, compared to linen.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

linen is 2 to 3 times stronger, dries faster and absorbs more water...but also costs more..the cotton is pre-shrunk, that's good, and should wash fine in cold water.


Sylvia

varda's picture
varda

That looks great.  The crumb is just beautiful.  -Varda

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 Your great explanation of the taste of the miche is really apealing to me.  Thank you for posting this, David!


Akiko

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I would encourage you to make this bread and taste it for yourself.


David

Franko's picture
Franko

This is a beauty David!


I'd wanted to comment on your loaf last night but my day ends early and I ran out of time, but now I have a chance to tell you what a brilliant piece of work this loaf is. This is a loaf that any baker, pro or home, would be proud of. Seeing your results from overnight retarding with high hydration mixes, as well as Andy's recent post of his Pain au Levain have convinced me I have to find a way in my production schedule to use this procedure more often. Aside from the procedure you used, the hand skills in molding and slashing are clearly evident, and what we all strive for from bake to bake. What a fine example of bringing it all together to create a truly well crafted loaf of bread. Bravo!


Franko

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thank you for your very kind words.


Having seen the instructors at SFBI shape loaf after loaf to perfection, albeit in relative slow motion for the benefit of the students, I am acutely aware of the difference between home and bakery environments.


Retardation, in addition to impacting flavor, has a major benefit for scheduling production. At the SFBI, retardation allows the bakers to get to work at 5 am rather than 2 or 3 am to bake the goods for the opening of their retail bakery in San Francisco. It's a "quality of life" issue to them, more than a quality of product issue. And the quality of everything I've tasted from the Thorough Bread Bakery has been wonderful.


David

ananda's picture
ananda

Yes, I so agree  with that David; refrigeration costs quite a bit of money but it has many positive impacts for both bakers and products.


Now the crumb shot is up, I'll just agree with Franko, that this loaf is really great bread.


Best wishes


Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello David,
This loaf is really something - may I please refer to Franko's comment - he articulated what I was thinking as I gazed upon this picture-perfect loaf.
(BTW I love the close-up shot of that gorgeous, colorful and speckled crust).
I appreciate the comments too - always something to learn from you and the other very experience bakers here on TFL.
With thanks from breadsong

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You are showing us some pretty fabulous breads yourself!


Happy baking!


David

thedutchbaker's picture
thedutchbaker

Hello David,


I have a question,


At the beginning you said that you changed the Bread flour and WW flour for High EX flour, the recipe you have here has AP flour, so the question here is did you use AP or bread flour. I would like to bake this bread but like some correction( direction) if needed.


Your bread looks great.


Hans

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The formula calls for "bread flour," but what SFBI means by this is bread with a protein content of around 11.5%. All the AP flours I use have 11.5 to 11.7% protein. For example, KAF AP flour has 11.7% protein.


I find this gives a sufficiently high rise and chewy crumb, if the gluten is adequately developed.


I only use flours with higher protein content for enriched breads, bagels and rye breads.


I hope this helps.


Thanks for your kind words.


David