The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Disaster! Help

Lion King's picture
Lion King

Disaster! Help

Hello, I had just baked  Brown Onion Bread and the top crust of the breads became hollow and one cracked open. Han anybody give me some advice and answers here please?


 



Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Got anymore details how you shaped it and the amount of proofing that was done?  ...oh and a few temps.  Looks like a bit of flour was used in the shaping and the pattern in the crust tells me that's where to start...  with the shaping videos on site.  Click on them and see if you can get some ideas.

Waiting for a crumb shot...   :)

Lion King's picture
Lion King

 


I had let it proof for about an hour to hour and a half open in a warm room. The only flour that was used other than for the dough was what I sprinkled on the surface to knead the dough. As you can see now, the texture is perfect. The problem is the top crust, I however always spray some water over the loafs after 10 minutes in the oven to get the top crust nice and crispy.


 


So, what is your diagnoses docktor? LOL  Regards


ED



 


 

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I would guess that your crust "blister" developed under an exterior that had hardened, trapping CO2.  Wondering if a slash or two in the top of the loaf might have helped here.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Does "open" proofing mean that the dough surface had a chance to dry out and toughen a little bit?  If so, that might just be the problem.  Try covering the surface with something (like lightly oiled plasti-crap or damp towel) or placing the whole dough pan inside a closed bag or cover to keep a "skin" from forming.  I also suspect you could shorten your final proofing time.


Diagnostic crumb shot... sneaky you!  :)   I zoomed in quite a bit but I have to say... a straight on shot is a bit more helpful.   I know, the crust was more important.  But like the mantel on the planet, a lot can be known from the way the underlying pressures push the crust up and around.


Aside from the top crust falling off... (which probably got devoured before anything hit the main slice) ...how was the bread?  


Mini  

Lion King's picture
Lion King

Yes, I had it open and I think you are really on target there! But I never covered it before and I did get some good results, I will try to do as you say next time( This Friday). The bread(two loafs) do not last the evening out, not if it is home baked! It was a Brown Onion bread, I used brown onion soup powder and it tasted delicious!!! The texture had been the best I ever got from bread. OK, now would you suggest I shorten the proofing time to les than a hour? I normaly see when it had cleared the pan top.


ED

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I don't want to step on Mini's contribution - she is much better qualified than I am to guide you through your discovery experience with this type of bread.  But I would like to make one suggestion.


Make your decision on your proofing time depending on the condition of the dough at any given point in the process.  If you use the clock to time your proofing period you risk over/under proofing.  I'd suggest using the proven finger poke test as a starting point.


Hoping that Mini will share some more of her insight with us.

Lion King's picture
Lion King

Thank you for the advice, I normaly watch the dough to rise to the brim of the pans. Will keep you all posted!


ED

jillybeansisme's picture
jillybeansisme

Usually when the crust separates it is because the bread has proofed too long or too much flour was used in the dough.


Hope this helps.


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