The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Backing and Pizza stones - need help with sources

NCbaker's picture
NCbaker

Backing and Pizza stones - need help with sources

I am upgrading to 15x20 stone and having difficult time finding resources online that have any in inventory. 


I narrowed my options to clay or cordierite stones.  Not interested in Fibrament-D.  BTW, if you do buy Fibrament-D it must be from AWMCO in IL. All others are not certified by NSF.


 


Fantes.com is out of stock on clay stones and no ETA.


NY Bakers - no answers or reply from them .


Can anyone else suggest sources for US made Clay or Cordierite stones that carry 15x20 size.


I have several stones by ONEIDA 15x14 that I am thinking of cutting to create 15x20 but would prefer a single stone.


Even sent an email to Hartstone Pottery in Ohio to see if they do custom work.


 


Thanks


NC Baker,.

Chuck's picture
Chuck

Sheffield Pottery in Massachusetts (is that too far away?) is reputed to be a good source of cordierite kiln shelves. (They seem to have some "closeout" deals and some other materials besides cordierite too, which I didn't look at and don't know anything about  ...especially not their suitability for baking bread.)


Of course they don't seem to have any in exactly the size you want. But maybe that's not a big deal. I found paying $10 to a crazy neighbor with a wetted diamond wheel tile saw to cut my baking stone to the exact dimensions I needed for my oven to be a good deal.

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

If you can find someone to trim it Axner Pottery offers a 20 by 20 


 


 


http://www.axner.com/cordierite-shelf-20x20square.aspx

purplepig's picture
purplepig

What is the concern with Fibrament-D?


It complies with NSF standards


Interestingly enough there is no listing for Cordierite


However the MSDS for this material only indicates an issue with prolonged exposure to the dust.


No MSDS for fibrament though ...


No wonder there are so many threads on this topic

NCbaker's picture
NCbaker

No issue with Fibrament-D but only one company (AWMCO) has NSF certification.  Spoke to NSF about websites selling Fibrament-D.  NSF requires that if anyone resells Fibrament-D from AWMCO must sell it in its original box and include NSF sticker. 


I purchased and returned a Fibrament-D from fornobravo.  Their site does not even list it as Fibrament-D.  It came without any references who manufactured it and no NSF stickers.  After emailing their customer service rep, they emailed a link to NSF for AWMCO.  So whoes board was it?  I suspect they resell AWMCO board.


I think they safest best is clay stone that was manufactured in US.


 


Right now I am using ONEIDA's but waiting for fantes.com to restock their inventory so that I can purchase a clay stone.


 


NC Baker

purplepig's picture
purplepig

I was looking at that stone on fantes. I currenlty have to Williams Sonoma one (14x16) which apparently is made of cordierite. I like how it works, but would like to maximize the size/thickness. I can fit a 15x20 and still leave the 1" gap that many recommend.


I wonder why they refer to cordierite as natural. I saw a bit of information on processes to create that material when I was trying to find the MSDS. Looking at my WS stone, it seems to be some kind of molded compound.


 


I am a little nervous about the outgassing that has been reported from fibrament stones by a few people. I have parrots and they would be quite sensitive to any fumes.


From the Fibrament FAQ. This entry is not present in the version of the faq on Breadtopia.



14 What can I expect to observe during the pre-drying phase?


A thermal analysis was conducted by the National Brick Research Center. Their test confirmed no emissions other than water vapor and carbon dioxide were detected when FibraMent was heated to 600°F.

You may notice an odor during the pre-drying process. The degree of the odor is subjective and occurs only once when the baking stone is being pre-dried before its initial use. The odor is easily eliminated by using your oven's exhaust fan.



Last time I checked CO2 and water were both odorless. So, what are they smelling?


 


 

Chuck's picture
Chuck

I am a little nervous about the outgassing that has been reported from fibrament stones by a few people. I have parrots and they would be quite sensitive to any fumes.


As the FAQ says, whatever problem there is (or isn't:-) is a one-time thing. You can move your parrots out once. It's not like Teflon that outgasses every time it gets too hot no matter how old it is.


 


So, what are they smelling?


AFAIK, nobody knows. Clearly it's something that at least some human noses can detect, but whatever it is hasn't yet been detected and named by any scientific procedure.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost


I wonder why they refer to cordierite as natural. I saw a bit of information on processes to create that material when I was trying to find the MSDS. Looking at my WS stone, it seems to be some kind of molded compound.



Cordierite is a naturally occuring mineral/stone. It is also gathered and processed, and manufactuered into a material(also called cordierite) used for baking stones that some of us are familiar with. Many, maybe the majority, of the "stone decks" in very expensive, professional ovens use cordierite stone decks.


As far as NSF certification for baking stones, I would hazard to guess that these determinations are made on an ongoing, case by case basis. I would guess that only the final, finished product would be certified, or not, as safe. In other words, just because one component of a product may be safe, other components, processes, etc, that it may be involved with may make the end result uncertifiable.

3 Olives's picture
3 Olives

Did you call NY Bakers? I'd order from NY Bakers. Their customer service is top notch. 

cranbo's picture
cranbo

I'm pretty happy with my sheet steel, you might consider that instead of your stone. Cheap and durable. 


Not to hijack the thread, but I wonder what the real advantages of stone are over steel? Sheet steel heats up more quickly, and can arguably hold heat just as well. 

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Cranbo, I just started working with steel last weekend ( 3/8 ) plate and agree it seems to have some advantages.  The cons are that it is not as easy to find ( A lot of kitchen stores offer stones )  it can be extremely heavy compared to a stone, and there is not much info on how to season and use it for pizza.  I haven't used it for bread, but doubt it has much advantage over stone. 

wdavis111's picture
wdavis111

Just received my Fibrament-D from AWMCO and am spending the day drying it out in the oven as per included instructions (1 hour @ 100, 1 hour @ 200, 1 hour @ 300, 1 hour @400, 2 hours @ 500), and GOSH but it stinks in my house now!  I truly hope this 'outgassing' only happens this one time and never during regular baking.

dablues's picture
dablues

I use mine all the time, and after the first preparation I have had no problems.  I like mine, and would purchase again, if needed.