The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Freezing bread dough

  • Pin It
turtle's picture
turtle

Freezing bread dough

I am a newbie baker, so I'm feeling my way around this fascinating field slowly! Right now, I'd like to know if I can freeze the really wet doughs in no knead baking. I just made a batch of Brioche. Thanks!

fminparis's picture
fminparis

I can never understand questions like this.  Instead of relying on others who may get various results, why don't you try it and see what YOUR results are?  It's only a batch of dough. If it's not good, throw it out. If it is, you've discovered something.

turtle's picture
turtle

So sorry to have bothered you!

Ford's picture
Ford

Welcome Turtle from Minnesota,


People have frozen dough, but with variable results. I don't have a definitive answer.  Perhaps someone else does.  I just refrigerate, aka retard, the dough then let it complete the fermentation before baking.


Residenr Conservative Curmudgeon, Ford

Ford's picture
Ford

Welcome Turtle from Minnesota,


People have frozen dough, but with variable results. I don't have a definitive answer.  Perhaps someone else does.  I just refrigerate, aka retard, the dough then let it complete the fermentation before baking.


Resident Conservative Curmudgeon, Ford

cranbo's picture
cranbo

I regularly freeze the pizza dough I make into balls and used them later, works fine for me. This is a pretty lean dough there, so YMMV for brioche. 


Freezing and defrosting can be a challenge because it messes with fermentation timelines. If you're going to freeze your dough, I'd do it after a shortened initial (bulk) fermentation. For example, if your standard recipe calls for bulk fermentation time of 2 hours, then shaping, if planning to freeze I would let it bulk ferment maybe 30 min, then throw it in the freezer. The dough ball will still be fermenting as the freezer cools the dough. Then when you defrost it, make sure you do so in the fridge. 


That way, during both freezing and defrosting (in fridge, preferably), you'll likely minimize the chances of overproofing. 


Let us know how it goes!

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat

I've had variable success freezing dough and using frozen dough (even pizza dough). With a really loose dough, I'd be worried about water crystalization severing the gluten, in addition to hinking up the fermentation.


You might be better off baking the extra loaf and then freezing that. I've had more luck freezing the loaf than the dough - YMMV

HMerlitti's picture
HMerlitti

hey fminparis.   I love your response !!


Were you my nun in gradeschool ??

turtle's picture
turtle

 I put my Brioche dough in the freezer after first ferment.I then let it thaw overnight and made pastries today. No change in texture, rise or taste! Granted it was only frozen for three nights, so how it will react  after longer periods, who can tell. I don't have alot of freezer space, so this might be the way to go! Thanks, all who wrote in!

Michaelw's picture
Michaelw


I used to keep a stack of pizza bases in the deep freeze. To use one I just created my pizza straight on the frozen base, put it in the oven, thawed, and cooked it at the same time. It was never a problem.


 


The kitchen I used to work in had Brioche dough in balls in the deep freeze and when the Brioche was starting to run low I would take 5 balls out and put them straight into the tin which I think we let sit to thaw and rise(?). Don’t know what state the dough reached before freezing as the pastry chef worked different shifts.


Have a search around on the web for information or better still experiment – but keep a log so you know what you did.


 


Ps Just checked in the Ballymaloe Cook Book and in the Brioche recipe it says that after the ‘little hat’ has been put on – classic brioche style in fluted tin – the dough may be frozen at this stage.