The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Extremely soft sourdough sandwich bread - the most shreddble, soft, velvety ever!

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Extremely soft sourdough sandwich bread - the most shreddble, soft, velvety ever!

 

I have posted about how to make very soft, very fluffy, yet still bouncy sandwich breads with lots of flavor(see here). The key isn't any gimmick or special ingredient, it's intensive kneading, a full long bulk rise, and proper shaping. I have posted the windowpane picture in the earlier post, but still got some questions about it. Here I will try to describle how the dough would progress during intensive kneading:

1. Dough starts to come together, but if you pull a piece, the dough would easily tear, won't form windowpane.

2. Keep kneading, the windowpane gradually starts to form, but it's thick, and won't extend very far. If you poke and get a hole, the edge is rough.

3. keep kneading, the windowpane becomes very extensible. The windowpane is thin but very very tough to break. If you poke a hole (I actually have to use my nail), the edge is smooth.

4. Keep kneading, the windowpane becomes even thinner, more transparent, but it becomes more delicate, easier to poke holes. The edge of the hole is still smooth.

5. Keep kneading, the dough starts to break down into a puddle of mud.

 

Stage 3 is the "golden point" for creating sandwiches with the best texture, and highest volume. 4 is a little over, your bread will still be high and nice, bu the texture would be a bit rough.  Of course it will take a few trail and error to get to that point reliably. In addition, if you are making a sourdough version like I do here, the bulk rise would take a lot longer than the dry yeast version. During this time, the dough is still getting stronger, which means, we need to knead the dough a tiny bit less than stage 3. This time I stopped kneading probably 30secs before it reaches stage 3, and the bread I got is the softest, most shreddable, bounciest I have ever gotten.

 

Sourdough Incredibly soft white bread

Note: 19% of the flour is in levain

Note: total flour is 250g, fit my Chinese small-ish pullman pan. For 8X4 US loaf tin, I suggest to use about 270g of total flour. For KAF 13X4X4 pullman pan, I would suggest using about 430g of total flour.

- levain

starter (100%), 13g

milk, 22g

bread flour, 41g

1. Mix and let fermentation at room temp (73F) for 12 hours.

- final dough

bread flour, 203g (I used half KAF bread flour and half KAF AP flour for a balance of chewiness and volume)

sugar, 25g

butter, 25g, softened

egg whites, 60g

salt, 3g

milk, 102g

 

1. mix until stage 3 of windowpane (-30sec:P)

2. rise at room temp for 2 hours, punch down, put in fridge overnight.

3. takeout, divide, round, rest for 1 hour. shape as instructed here.

4. rise at room temp for about 6 hours. For my pullman pan, it should be about 80% full; for US 8x4inch pan, it should be about one inch above the edge. The dough would have tripled by then, if it can't, your kneading is not enough or over.

5. bake at 350F for 45min. brush with butter when warm.

 

Crumb shots from different parts of the bread, all very velvety soft, with no pores.

 

So soft that it's hard to cut, much easier to tear off pieces

 

Amazingly soft and flavorful

 

Sending this to Yeastspotting.

Comments

jethreaux's picture
jethreaux

I'm brand new to baking. I have a starter and I fed it and allowed it and allowed it to rise, reduced by half, then fed and allowed it to rise again. Everything looked great and appeared to be the same as any pictures I found for a healthy starter. I then attempted this recipe. I combined 13g of starter, 22g of Milk, and 41g flour. The mixture seemed very dry. 12 hours later, there has been basically no change to the levain. I'm assuming it is supposed to rise, but it as not. Any guess as to what I may be doing wrong?

 

ghstorchid's picture
ghstorchid

Hello! I live in TX and the location of my fermentation for levain and bulk fermentation is 81 degrees ambient. I know this will change my fermentation time dramatically and I have no idea what to look for as far as readiness in a firm levain. About how long do you think this should that take?

frumgirl1's picture
frumgirl1

Does anyone have a baker's formula for this recipe? I am so confused. If there were a formula there I think I could scale it up and down much more easily, but I'm having a hard time converting it into a percentage myself. Txfarmer, your bread is so beautiful. I just need some help getting started.

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

Here’s my quick take on the formula:

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Flour

6.5

6.5

 

 

2.59

Water

6.5

 

100

6.50

2.59

Levain Flour

41

41

 

 

16.37

Whole Milk

22

 

88.3

19.43

8.78

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Bread Flour

103

103

 

 

41.12

AP Flour

100

100

 

 

39.92

Sugar

25

 

 

 

9.98

Butter

25

 

17.9

4.48

9.98

Egg Whites

60

 

87.6

52.56

23.95

Whole Milk

102

 

88.3

90.07

40.72

Salt

3

 

 

 

1.20

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

494

 

 

 

197.21

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

250.5

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

173.03

69.07

Note:  The “% Water” column shows what percentage of water is in that particular ingredient, and I use it to calculate how much that ingredient adds to the overall hydration of the dough.

Hope this helps!

Cayla's picture
Cayla

Excellent bread. I'll admit, I tried this recipe hand kneading four times before I gave in and got a mixer with a dough hook. All worth it for this fluffy loaf!

Question: has anyone modified this recipe to add grains or seeds?

knightsofneech's picture
knightsofneech

Hello! Thank you for the lovely recipe. Your pictures are no longer working. Are you able to re-upload a few?

Two questions if you have a moment:

-I want to add cheddar cheese and herbs. At what stage, would you say?
-Would adding powdered milk be useful? I have a large amount on hand at the moment.

myrtleskitchen's picture
myrtleskitchen

This is delightful, and I am working on making this bread. I was working on my own take with some whey,  skim milk powder and oil.  I was doing it at 96% hydration and  while kneading gave up and  readjusted the flour to  make the hydration 75%.

I often save the aquafaba from canned beans as it has been the most amazing new vegan ingredient and works like egg whites in every way. Stupid me forgot to defrost some, so this will be without the "egg" I Hope it works.  Ill finish this version of bread and then keen to try this. 

Has anyone else used aquafaba in brioche or  even heard of it? 

I used a  rye and seed grain for my starter feed, 110g per 450g flour, except  i added another  120 gm flour and some coconut flour.. so  very experimental - Will let you know.

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