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Goma shokupan ( Sesami loaf)

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teketeke's picture
teketeke

Goma shokupan ( Sesami loaf)

I have baked this loaf over and over to get my daughter who only likes white bread says " Yummy".   I finally heard some good words from her who said, " It is good! Can I have more?"  That made my day. 

This formula is adapted from the book " Coupe Junkies" which was published by 2 Japanese home bakers. 

 

I mentioned this book on my other post of " Amazing airly baguette" too.   There are a lot of good techniques in the book.

Here is what I used to bake the loaf that my daugther didn't eat.  My son and I enjoyed it though.  However, this loaf doesn't rise much. Especially it is in the oven. It is also little difficult to knead too that is what the book read.  To rise in the oven, they use " cold start" in the oven. I never have tried it yet. I am still afriad of using the method. I better try it very soon.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22851/20110320-akiko%E2%80%99s-japanese-white-bread#comment-163260

They don't use 2 times bulkfermentation for this loaf in the book, but I wanted to try to see how different between 1 time bulkfermentation and 2 times one.   The authors wrote that it rises more than 1 time bulkfermentation.   I didn't see the difference actually.. but I can taste the difference of the taste.  1 time bulkfermentation until tripled --- Very soft crumb     2 times bulkfermentation until tripled-- chewy crumb  /  When the dough rose only double in bulk on the second time, the crumb was really chewy.. I didn't like it at all.

 

This is the loaf that my daughter is pleased with finally.

My  pullman size:23cmx10.5cmx10cm 

Ingredients:

Bread flour ( KA)  400g

Levain              120g  ( 60g KA AP/ 60g raisin yeast water )  mix and rest at 74-76F for 12 hours

Sugar        14g

Water      220g  DDT 76F

Salt     7g

Shortening   12g

Sesami   black  19g/ white 19g= 38g   ( Toasted  before adding into the dough)

----------------------

Method:

1. Mix all the ingredients except the salt and the shortening and the sesami.

2 Autolize  30 minutes

3. Add the rest of the ingredients.

4. Knead  until you pass a window pane test.

5. Bulkfermentation   6 hours at 80F ( The dough should rise triples in bulk)

6.  Divide and preshape * I made a letter fold ( degassing) taking out the dough from the container.

 * I divide the dough in 3 pieces without using any flour.

Example:

The total weight was 783g today. I divided it like this:

267g/249g/267g =Left/Center/Right

This is my way to divide the dough in 3 pieces:

The left and right dough weight: 783÷3+6=267g

The rest of the dough should be the center. 249g

7. Bench time  30 minutes

8. Shape and proof  2 hours at 82F

* After I panned the dough in my pullman.

 I waited until the dough rose over the top of the tin.

9. Bake ( Preheated 438F)    Spray water around the wall in the oven 4 times and bake at 410F for 35 minutes.  Brush some melted butter on the top of the loaf after baking.

When you use instant yeast for this loaf, I will use this straight method:

Bread flour 100%

Instant yeast 0.8-0.9%  ( I always use less amount yeast because I don't want to smell strong  brewer in bread.)

Sugar 5%

Salt 1.5-1.8% ( As you like)

Water 55%

Shortening or White sesami oil    3%  ( Using shortening will have a great result of rising  than using sesami oil)

White sesami  4.7%  Toasted before adding

Black sesami 4.7%  Toasted before adding

------------------------------------------------------------

 

* I tested " Cold start". You can see the result here. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23054/cold-start

* How to shape and mold a mountain loaf:

1   I use a little bit flour to shape the dough. * May be 1-2g blended flour -50% rice flour /50% KA AP flour for shaping.

 Before shaping ( I dumped less 3g AP/rice flour  on the surface)

 After I panned the dough. ( I don't use much flour for shaping)

.

2

*Gently press down the preshaped ball shaped dough which is seamed up with your whole palm, and make a oval shape using a rolling pin. ( rolling from the center toward outer side to all the direction. * not only up and down )

3.

 Ready to fold.

4.

You can press the center gently after folding 1/3 from the outer side, then rolling it into a snail shell shape.

5.

Roll it gently, but not too tight, not too loose.

6.

 Pinch the seam very well!

7.

 You should mold the dough of the direction as the picture above to rise well evenly.   * Don't forget to put the smallest dough in the center.

Note:

*If your final dough doesn't rise much enough to get cloese the top of your tin loaf pan, you don't have to wait if your final dough rises 1cm less from the top of the tin. Sometimes, my final dough didn't rise enough to the top of the tin, but I baked the dough that was under 1cm from the top of the tin. It rose quite well in the oven with " cold start".

 

Best wishes,

Akiko

 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi, Akiko:


What a coincidence! Besides milk loaf, the sesame loaf was another one I enjoyed very much when I was making yeasted sandwich loaves. I've got to give yours a try, but probably will have to wait until after the Spring Break. Thanks for sharing!


Yippee

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Your welcome, Yippee.   I better make your water-roux loaf again. :) Thank you, too!


Best wishes,


Akiko

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Look great, akiko. That's great to have yr daughter like this relatively lean bread. I love sesame seeds on bread too. The aroma is wonderful.

Sue
http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you, Sue! I love to smell of the bread especially when it is toasted.

Best wishes,
Akiko

Mebake's picture
Mebake

very nice, and soft, Akiko!


Iam going to try your panning method on my wholewheat loaves. Thanks

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you, Khalid!  I'd like to see your mountain shaped Whole wheat bread! 


Best wishes,


Akiko

kim's picture
kim

Akiko,


I love sesame so much and will try your recipe when I find a decent loaf pan.


Thanks,


Kimmy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you, Kimmy!  I hope that your result makes you smile :)


Please let me know if you have a question,


Akiko

kim's picture
kim

Akiko,


I bake your recipe this morning too bad I'm not being able to take picture before sending them to my friends. My friends love them so much. Thank you. I substitute shortening for lard. I want to try cold start next time.


Kimmy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Kimmy


I am so glad to hear that your friends love them. Did you like them, too?  I recently made lard at home using pig fat. It was really tasty thanks to Txfarmer who posted some bakes using home-made lard.  I will use lard for this goma shoku when I made it next time.


Please let me know how your "Cold start" turns out. :)


Best wishes,


Akiko

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I love reading your posts as they give very precise instructions with the help of pictures..I would love to try the sesame loaf and have been quite successful with the water roux method and I may use this method to make the sesame loaf. One question about the first proof,,does it require 6 hrs or is it only because you're using a levain rather than instant yeast? Will the dough not overproof and collapse?   I noticed that the temp specified is not too cold so you're not proofing this in a fridge and feels more like room temp. In HK the room temp is around 23 - 25 C at this time of the year and I get a fairly good rise after 1 hr. ,I use SAF instant yeast only as I'm not yet good enough to experiment with other methods.  Thanks.  Kind regards, Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Judy


Thank you for your kind words. :) I put more details of shaping and molding the dough.


If you use instand dry yeast, it doesn't take 6 hours to ferment for 6 hours on the bulk fermentation. Yes, I like to use 100% wild yeast instead of dry yeast. I just like the aroma and the flavor in the bread.Although It is difficult to get the crumb that I like when I make hard bread like rye bread or Pain au levain with yeast water. I am still studying to get the right crumb. I use a pinch of yeast when I make rye bread with my raisin yeast water.   I let the dough at colder temperature for bulkfermentation to get cracky crust, and I proof the dough at warmer temperature to get fluffy light crumb.   When you use instant yeast for this loaf, I will used this straight method:


Bread flour 100%


Instant yeast 0.8-0.9%  ( I always use less amount yeast because I don't want to smell strong  brewer in bread.)


Sugar 5%


Salt 1.5-1.8% ( As you like)


Water 55%


Shortening or White sesami oil    3%


White sesami  4.7%  Toasted before adding


Black sesami 4.7%  Toasted before adding


 


I hope that helps you.  Please let me know if you have any questions.


Best wishes,


Akiko


 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

This is going to be my next weekend project and I'll try it with a a bit of whole wheat flour,  I may try it with 50/50 butter/shortening and see how it comes out.  I'Il be sure to post pics if it's successful.  Cheers, Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Your welcome, Judy


If your final dough doesn't rise much enough to get cloese the top of your tin loaf pan, you don't have to wait if your final dough rises 1cm less from the top of the tin. Sometimes, my final dough doesn't rise enough to the top of the tin, but I bake the dough that is under 1cm from the top of the tin. It rose quite well in the oven with " cold start".


Best wishes,


Akiko

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I've also sent you a message re Japanese bread books, pls check your TFL message box.  Best, Judy

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Hello Akiko-san , thank you for your instuctions on the Sesame loaf recipe, I tried it out last night.  I almost over-proofed the dough as I fell asleep while waiting for it to proof in my steam oven, when I woke up it had reached the top of the container and had been proofing for around 2.5 hrs.   I baked with the cold start and was worried that it woudn't work as it took me almost 10 mins for the oven to get from 0 - 100C and I increased to 150 for another 10 mins as soon as it hit 100C. It continued to bake for  few  mins at 150C and increased to 200+ for 20 mins.  This is the final result.  It worked!!  I used 250 grms b/f + 50 grm wholewheat flour. 


I don't have your rise but wonder if it could be because I had two dough balls at (265 grms each) in the loaf pan instead of 3 balls.   My loaf pan measures 8"4"x3"H and can fit 2 balls only.  The dough would be very squashed if I tried to fit in 3 and won't leave enough space for the dough to expand.  Would you remember how much each of your dough weighed?   Best Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Judy


Your loaf look very nice, Judy. I wonder how your loaf's taste was. I looked up cold start oven method with gas oven on Japanese google. I think her method may be better than the one I wrote on my recipe.


http://yaplog.jp/mcys/archive/644


Cold start :130℃ 15 minutes →180℃ 20 minutes. Her loaf's side looks good, doesn't? 


I wish I had a gas oven to tell you how my loaf turned out. 


As you said, 3 balls will rise more than 2 balls in our sight because the center of the 3 ball dough will be tallest after baking. More likely 2 balls dough tend to rise side way,  3 ball dough rise upward.


My whole wheat loaf looked pale everytime I baked so far. I took the loaf out after I baked 25 minutes at 410F then put the loaf back in the oven to bake 10 more minutes at 410F.  I got this idea from Daisy-A's post. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19923/bread-art-heritage-katy-and-rebecca-beinart039s-work-and-simple-white-sourdough-tin-loaf



Place the tins in the oven at 220◦C/ Gas 7. Bake for 30 minutes. Then remove the bread from the tins and bake for a further 10-15 minutes to form a good crust. The loaves should sound hollow when you tap the bottom. Remove from tins and leave them to cool before cutting.




Would you remember how much each of your dough weighed?



I didn't leave the memo of the dough weight unfortunetely. I will tell you the dough weight when I make the sesami loaf next time.


I am glad to see your cold start worked, Judy. Thank you for telling us your result of the cold oven.  Your experiment will be very useful for the other TFL members who has a gas oven for sure.


Best wishes,


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I just wanted say that your loaf look very tasty !!


In addtion to the former response, I want to show you this baking method:


*If you use a usa loaf pan, I used to use a parchment paper to make tall loaf like this:


 


 手順11の写真写真 I baked like this ■Preheat the oven to 200℃ or 400F.  Decrease 180℃ or 350F and bake for 30 minutes.   It could rise more if I used the cold start, I wonder.


Best wishes,


Akiko

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Thank you for your compliment. I also took the loaf out of the pan and covered the top with tin foil for the sides to brown but I didn't leave it in  long enough as I was afraid that my loaf may be too tough. I may baking from 130C - 180C next time but my tutor warned me that when using instant yeast, there is the possiblity of the yeast giving out a sour smell/taste when using the gradual heat to give the dough a final boost in the rise, that's why it is advisable to use less yeast as you suggested.  The crumb is soft, I hope it will still remain soft and fluffy tomorrow.   I'm waiting for another loaf to proof as I type :)

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Judy


I am not sure about your loaf getting tough if you bake 10 more minutes after taking out the loaf from your tin because you use a gas oven. For electric oven, It didn't get too tough crust, it was cripsy one that I like, especially when I toasted it.


Thank you for your information of dry yeast giving sour smell/ taste when we use the cold start. I have seen some Japanese home bakers has had been successful of using this cold start with dry yeast:


http://assammilk.exblog.jp/15701727/


Using less yeast is a good thing to make good bread in my opinion.


Good luck, Judy!!


Akiko

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Both in your flikr pictures and here ...how do you get such a shiny crust on your bread?  My egg washes never turn out that shiny.  Do you apply the wash several times?  Or if you are not using a wash, then what is making the top crust so shiny?


Brian

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Brian,


Thank you for pointing this out. I forgot to write about this.  I just brush melted butter on the top of the loaf after baking.    I don't like to brush egg washes or some milk or spraying water on the loaf before baking. I have had a lot of troubles to remove the loaf out of my loaf pan.  The liquid work as a glue to sick together.  But I do use egg washes when I make some buns. :)


Best wishes,


Akiko


 

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Thanks!  (Butter ....MMmmmmmm ....butter!)

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Your welcome, Brian :)


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Judy


Here is the answer of your question:



Would you remember how much each of your dough weighed?



The total weight was 783g today. I divided it like this:


267g/249g/267g =Left/Center/Right


This is my way to divide the dough in 3 pieces:


The left and right dough weight: 783÷3+6=267g


The rest of the dough should be the center. 249g


Best wishes,


Akiko

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

That's really kind of you to bake yr bread again to give me the answer.  I'm assuming you have used 400 grm of flour whereas I have only used 300.  I'll try yr recipe again and use a slightly larger loaf pan for three balls. Was there a little space between the dough when you put them into the pan to proof? I'm sorry to be asking so many questions but the size of the loaf pan is crucial to the final outcome.  Could the rise be due to the upward expansion when there is no room for it to expand horizontally.  Best wishes, Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Judy!


Please don't be sorry to ask me any question.  I am glad to tell my baking history to anybody. 



Was there a little space between the dough when you put them into the pan to proof?



No, There was almost no space between the dough. They were placed very nicely fit to the loaf pan.


I will finger cross for your next sesami loaf,


Akiko


 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

How much flour did you use to get 783 grm?  Should I divide the dough before or after degassing?   Can you also let me know the size/height of the loaf pan that you used?  For my 2 ball dough size, My 262-265 grm balls came to approx 50 - 60%% the height of the loaf pan, as soon as the top was peeking out of the rim after an hour,  I put in the oven. (note my tin is only 3" high which is a more like a pound cake tin) so it may not be the correct height of a normal loaf pan?  I think the square pullman loaf pan is slightly taller? Thanks, Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Judy,


I updated my sesami bread. My pullman's height is 10cm /3.9inches .  As I know, 3 ball dough will have a taller loaf than the 2 balls one.


My  pullman size:23cmx10.5cmx10cm 


I forgot to add the size on this goma loaf. Thank you for reminding me, Judy.


Best wishes,


Akiko

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi, Akiko:


I knew it would be good!  I'll post it when I make the 2nd loaf.  Thank you for sharing!


Yippee

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Your welcome, Yippee! That is great news, Yippee!!  I am so happy to hear that from you.  Thank you for telling me your result! :)


Best wishes,


Akiko