The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Nutrition data calculations?

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Nutrition data calculations?

Does anybody have a spreadsheet or method for calculating the following from a recipe?


 


- Carbohydrates, grams, per serving


- Fats, grams, per serving


- Protein, grams, per serving


- Fiber (insoluable), grams, per serving


 


Being able to do this would enable those of us that are dieting to better manage our diet, e.g. the Weight Watchers "Simply Filling" plan allows "reduced calorie" breads as 'power foods' but not regular breads ...and they give approximate nutrition data for this type of bread as follows (per 23g slice): 1.14g fat, 20.37g carbohydrates, 4g protein, and 4.46g fiber.


 


Thx,


Brian


 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

I use Nutitiondata.com .


A recipe I have stored there:


Whole Wheat Amish Graham Bread

I think www.food.com may do similar when you enter and store a recipe there. Last time I used theirs, it was listed in the simpler format like your example. It may have changed though, when they changed from recipezaar to food.com.


Interesting. Just realized the recipe above is also at food.com. At least a version of it. Evidently, the original version. Been about 2 years since I input my rendition. Of course the nutrition data looks different because that is dependent on the serving sizes selected when one inputs the data. At the time, I was designating a serving as 2 slices of bread(for a sandwich).


Recipe at food.com:


Amish Soft Honey Whole Wheat Bread


As a side note, I believe the ultimate source of all of this nutrition information is the USDA nutrition database. I think that many/most use this database to generate their info.

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Nice!  I had no idea you could enter recipes online like that and get the complete breakdown in an instant!  That's perfect, and it'll save me having to figure out some kind of spreadsheet to do the same!


 


Brian


 


 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Who says nothing good comes out of Washington'?

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

You mean the USDA nutrition data?  The web sites are private aren't they?

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

I think just about any nutritional info you read nowadays(certainly that on labels, and the type you're asking about) comes from that database. There is a link to it in the text below.(my conjecture. Certainly not the fact for all situations.)

 


"About NutritionData.com

Since its launch in 2003, Nutrition Data has grown into one of the most authoritative and useful sources of nutritional analysis on the Web. In July 2006, Nutrition Data was acquired by CondéNet, a digital publisher under the Condé Nast Publications umbrella dedicated to editorial excellence. Nutrition Data's continuing goal is to provide the most accurate and comprehensive nutrition analysis available, and to make it accessible and understandable to all.


The information in Nutrition Data's database comes from the USDA's National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference and is supplemented by listings provided by restaurants and food manufacturers. The source for each individual food item is listed in the footnotes of that food's Nutrition Facts page. In addition to food composition data, Nutrition Data also provides a variety of proprietary tools to analyze and interpret that data. These interpretations represent Nutrition Data's opinion and are based on calculations derived from Daily Reference Values (DRVs), Reference Daily Intakes (RDIs), published research, and recommendations of the FDA.


While Nutrition Data cannot guarantee the absolute accuracy of every listing, we make every attempt possible to ensure the quality of our data..."


Food.com has similar posting:


http://www.food.com/help/nutrition.zsp

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

...And I'll bet we paid 10X what that database would've cost if developed by the private sector :*)


 


Brian


 

ilantis's picture
ilantis

So true. We could really do without the exorbitant federal spending on databases. I mean, without pressure from the government, the various food & service industries would have certainly decided on objective, and standardized nutritional content information on their own accord. I bet the manufacturers would have even made it easily available to the public in one central location.


Even if they didn't, it isn't like we would need to be concerned with the fiscal fallout of a nation that becomes overweight due in part to lack of knowledge of what cheaply manufactured foods can mean for human physiology. It isn't like the supermajority of states in the USA have obesity rates of 20-30% (1 out of every 5 people) ...as in 1/3 their body weight is pure fat.


Thank god Doctors and hospitals get a pass on the Hippocratic Oath when some fatass comes in with clotted arteries so we, the taxpayer, don't have to share the financial burden of their decisions. Push 'em out the door and watch them roll down the hill. It is their fault that they were never taught proper eating habits anyway...the information was on the box!!! Or was it? I mean, these days...soda machines aren't prevalent in schools, fresh produce is cheaper than manufactured food, school lunches are healthier than ever, and all the hearty recipes that grandma used to have time to make are still employed in kitchens today! Mom and Dad -- er...well maybe Mom or Dad considering the USA divorce rate is nearing, if not past, 50% have more than enough time to prepare a fresh, healthy meal each night as well as make sure their children can get enough exercise to stay fit, and do enough homework to stay educated, and give them enough free time to stay socialized, and maybe get them to soccer on time.


All public policies are black or white; rejoice! Fire those DBA's and sell off those servers, I say! Those 2 salaries, depreciated hardware costs and electricity savings greatly outweigh any other costs! It is all these little things like this that are causing our nation to go broke after all.


 

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

...such programs.  One is DietPower, a reasonably priced program to record what I eat and exercise.  The database is large, but information on food labels can be quickly entered to customize the database.  Recipes can be created as well.


The other is Food.com.  I enter my recipes there and nutritional information is shown.


FF