The Fresh Loaf

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Sourdough Rye with Raisins and Walnuts

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MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Sourdough Rye with Raisins and Walnuts

Continue my weekend baking with rye bread. This weekend's bake was sourdough rye with walnuts and raisins. The bread has 35% rye flour. The recipe came from Hamelman's Bread cookbook.


I followed Hamelman's recipe by including commercial yeast and skip my usual overnight dough retardation. One of the advantages of including commercial yeast is a a shorter fermentation schedule. It only took 3.5 hrs to have the fresh loaves from the mixing.


I increased Hamelman's recipe to 2 kg for two 1-kg loaves (about 25% increase from Hamelman's recipe). This bread is flavoursome with natural sweetness from raisin, crunch from walnut and earthiness from rye. It was great toasted (the walnut aroma was wonderful when toasted).


More photos and recipe can be found here.


 




Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com


 


 

Comments

Franko's picture
Franko

Both of your breads look excellent Sue but I particularly like the scoring effect on the cut loaf in the background of the photo. Great job on the final proof as well. It looks like you got it at the optimum stage for a good jump in the oven. Nice! The flavour must be awesome.


Franko

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I also love the scoring on these very tasty looking loaves. Well done, Sue!


Sylvia

Syd's picture
Syd

Lovely looking loaves, Sue!  Like Franko and Sylvia, I also think the scoring is very attractive.  Well done. :)


Syd

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I echo Franko and Sylvia and Syd, I love the scoring that are very elegant, Sue.


Best wishes,


Akiko

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Sue,
Great-looking rye bread...and I like how you stacked the books up for your photo!
These loaves are beauties.
from breadsong


 


 


 

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Thanks Franko, Sylvia, Syd, Akiko and Breadsong for nice complements.


These complements mean even more when they came from you guys, wonderful bakers (and great bread artists too).


Franko - the bread tastes really good. I really enjoyed it. Rye fruit bread tastes nicer than the all white. I was also trying to replicate one of your scoring (I think the sour onion/mustard one with chevron cuts). But the bread opened and the cuts didn't eventuate to chevron's. I will also need to work on my scoring ,the blade angle and the depth of cut in particular.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

bubble's picture
bubble

 


Wow, what a coincidence!  I am just planning to give Hamelman recipe of raisin and walnut bread a try, because i still have 2 kg walnut in my fridge and thinking how to finish it quickly. I was wonder if this recipe will taste good, so i am happy to know your wonderfull result. The recipe called for 160 walnut, do you think it's still ok if i double the walnut? Thanks for sharing

bubble's picture
bubble

ups, sorry, i just realise of mistakenly look at Golden raisin and walnut bread p 133


anyway, the walnut in the sourdogh recipe is 125 g. So i am thinking to give 250 g.


Do you think the bread will probably collapse? Thanks, i am still new w/ SD baking.

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Hi Bubble,


I think it should be alright. I don't think that increasing walnuts amount will make the bread collapsed, as long as you don't overproof your dough.


I came across recipes with derivatives in breads (i.e. grains, seeds, nuts, fruits, etc) at over 25% (in Baker's Percentage term, 25% of total flour weight), and they are fine.


It might be a good idea to keep the total percentage of raisin and walnuts at less than 30% of total flour. Or you might use all 250g walnuts and reduce the raisin amount in the recipe....for example.


Have fun baking:)


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Beautiful, Sue! What an elegant bake.. Did you slice it before it cooled? Crumb looks somewhat shreddy.. But looks very tastey! Well done!

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

I'm in awe when I read your comment. You and your eagle eyes just wowed me:)


That's exactly right. I cut the loaves pretty much right after it was out of the oven. My partner, somehow, has a very good bread instinct. It's like he could smell the bread aroma from miles away. He was always starving for carb right after a big bike ride and can't help himself to cut it straight after.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

bubble's picture
bubble

Thank you for your kind guidance Sue, i felt confidence to bake the bread this morning and double  the walnut. Still I give the raisin 125 since i also love raisins:) . The dough was strong and raised well, it just difficult to slash cause of the abundant walnut. The bread taste awesome, raisin and walnut really are a perfect couple.This will be my family April bread :)   i try to post the result.


Sourdough walnut and raisin


 

bubble's picture
bubble

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

It looks great Bubble. I I think you did quite well with the shaping.


Walnut aroma is amazing when the bread is toasted too. It adds nice texture to the bread.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blgospot.com


 

bubble's picture
bubble

Thanks Sue.  My hand skill for SD bread is still very basic. I used to bake just soft asian bread type, so i have to try harder to improve my bread look. Yours is amazing!


After understanding all the natural benefit of SD baking, i try to bake more SD bread for the last one year. I have to choose recipes that my daughter would love because she use to eat soft and  white bread. Good news is she loves this nutty bread. I think because this bread doesn't give noticeable sour taste like  pure sourdough bread that doesn't include yeast.   This morning I toasted 4 slices for her and she dipped it in her milk and said, Mommy  ..it's yummmm!!   I did it ! finally she enjoy SD bread .


Happy SD baking :)


 

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

This recipe produces nice fruit bread. I'm glad your doughter loves it")


Hamelman's book also contiains other lovely sourdough fruit breads, golden raisins sourdough and prune & hazelnuts. I found prune & hazelnuts recipe is even nicer (and your doughter might like it even more) as it contains some butter, giving it tenderer crumbs.


I'm still new to bread making & SD as well. From my reading in Tartine Bread book, SD bread doesn't necessary always produces sour bread. If you use the starter just before it reaches its peak. The SD starter won't yield an acidic loaves, but more of sweet natural taste.


I also think that you can include the sourdough starter in any bread, about 20% of total weight, or thereabout. If it's sweet enriched bread, you can also include 0.5% - 1% of yeast to make sure that the bread will rise properly. I found that by including SD starter, it sigficantly enhance the bread flavour, and better keeping quality.


Yes, happy sourdough baking!


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

bubble's picture
bubble

Hi Sue,


Thanks you to let me know other good taste SD bread. I will jump to it this weekend :)


Also, I am getting excited to try sourdough method in baking asian sweet bread. I used to bake sweet bread w/ many kind of filling inside, chocolate, cheese, meat, pinnaple etc, but offcourse all are yeast bread and we are teached to put bread improver to give lightness and enhance the bread raising. Never come in my mind if i propably can use sourdough for asian bread recipes, cause i though they will be sour.


Thank you, you opened up my mind of the possibility using lactobacilly in our sweet bread. I really want to get rid off the bread improver from the breads. I think i need to learn the connection between the ripeness of starter with the sourness and the raising power it gave . Do you know any good link that i can read about?


Btw, I really enjoy your blog, faboulus breads you make with your home oven !  I will appreciate my oven more start from now on :)


Denise


 


 

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

There are quite a few posts on TFL about Basic Country Bread in Tartine Bread book. Try looking through txfarmer's blog posts on Tartine she posted about 4-5 months ago. The other good post regarding the use of young starter in Asian style sandwich bread was posted by Syd. If you look through Syd's blog. You will find one he posted recently.


From what I read in Tartine, Chad Robertson idea is to use the starter when it is young, with sweet aroma. Not at a ripen stage when it smells vinigary, means acidity and sourness in your final bread.


If the starter smell acidic, you can make bread from it, but it might yield acidic bread. Or you can feed your starter a bit more flour & water and let it ferment for another 2 hrs. I think you can experiment it a bit until you achieve the taste of bread that you enjoy.


Hope this helps.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

bubble's picture
bubble

Many thanks for your replying Sue, i really appreciate it.


Denise